Public Health and Your Health
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Public Health and Your Health
Medical, Health, and Wellness News and Information
Curated by JULIE BRANNON
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The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Inside the hyperengineered, savagely marketed, addiction-creating battle for American “stomach share.”
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Mauricio Reyes González's curator insight, November 4, 2017 8:19 AM
Comida chatarra, ciencia y adicción.
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A Call for Caution in the Use of Antipsychotic Drugs

A Call for Caution in the Use of Antipsychotic Drugs | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Drugs such as Abilify and Seroquel have been around for a long time, but until recently they were not widely used.

 

By RICHARD A. FRIEDMAN, M.D.

 

You will never guess what the fifth and sixth best-selling prescription drugs are in the United States, so I’ll just tell you: Abilify and Seroquel, two powerful antipsychotics. In 2011 alone, they and other antipsychotic drugs were prescribed to 3.1 million Americans at a cost of $18.2 billion, a 13 percent increase over the previous year, according to the market research firm IMS Health.

 

Those drugs are used to treat such serious psychiatric disorders as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe major depression. But the rates of these disorders have been stable in the adult population for years. So how did these and other antipsychotics get to be so popular?

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Branko | The Prostate Czech Trailer

A Man. A Cause. A Finger. He moves like a heavy Central European fog: dense, mysterious, yet insistent. It is whispered that he hails from Kladno, a proud Cz...
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The Clatter of the Hospital Room

The Clatter of the Hospital Room | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Initiatives are under way to reduce noise in hospitals, and while it's too early to tell whether they will prove successful, it has become clear that patient complaints about noise and lack of sleep are critical to quality of care.
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The Fork in the Road for Health Care

The Fork in the Road for Health Care | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Without major changes in health care costs, the day of rationing of care draws near, even if elected officials dare not mention it, an economist writes.
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Pentagon Contest to Develop Robots to Work in Disaster Areas

Pentagon Contest to Develop Robots to Work in Disaster Areas | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
The Pentagon’s research and development agency is to announce a competition to design specialized robots that can work in disaster zones while operating common tools and vehicles.
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Arsenic in Our Chicken?

Arsenic in Our Chicken? | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Two scientific studies suggesting that poultry on factory farms are routinely fed banned antibiotics and other chemicals raise serious questions.
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Broccoli and Bad Faith

Broccoli and Bad Faith | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
This week’s Supreme Court hearings on the health care law seemed to suggest that some justices were embracing any argument they could use to kill reform.

 

Nobody knows what the Supreme Court will decide with regard to the Affordable Care Act. But, after this week’s hearings, it seems quite possible that the court will strike down the “mandate” — the requirement that individuals purchase health insurance — and maybe the whole law. Removing the mandate would make the law much less workable, while striking down the whole thing would mean denying health coverage to 30 million or more Americans....

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Digital Records May Not Cut Health Costs, Study Cautions

Digital Records May Not Cut Health Costs, Study Cautions | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Researchers found that doctors using electronic records ordered expensive imaging tests more often than those relying on paper records.
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Why It's So Important to Keep Moving

Why It's So Important to Keep Moving | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Inactivity produced spikes in blood sugar levels in healthy young volunteers, which may help explain why sedentary behavior raises the risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

 

By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

 

Hoping to learn more about how inactivity affects disease risk, researchers at the University of Missouri recently persuaded a group of healthy, active young adults to stop moving around so much. Scientists have known for some time that sedentary people are at increased risk of developing heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. But they haven’t fully understood why, in part because studying the effects of sedentary behavior isn’t easy. People who are inactive may also be obese, eat poorly or face other lifestyle or metabolic issues that make it impossible to tease out the specific role that inactivity, on its own, plays in ill health...Continued...

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Really? The Claim: Your Body Clock Can Determine When You Get Sick

Really? The Claim: Your Body Clock Can Determine When You Get Sick | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
The immune system and the body's circadian rhythm, its internal clock, are intimately tied.

 

By ANAHAD O'CONNOR

 

THE FACTS

The immune system and the body’s internal clock are intimately tied.

Blood cells that fight disease ebb and flow with the body’s daily circadian rhythms. Levels of circulating T-cells peak at nighttime, for example, and then gradually subside. Studies have also shown that the immune system reacts to certain infections by manipulating circadian clock genes, promoting sleep and causing the fatigue that often accompanies illness.

Now, new research helps solidify the idea that our susceptibility to infection depends on the time of day. A study at Yale University showed that even the success of vaccination may hinge on circadian fluctuations. The study, published in the journal Immunity, looked at mice, but its findings dovetail with previous research on humans and other animals...CONTINUED...

 

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Overdiagnosis as a Flaw in Health Care

Overdiagnosis as a Flaw in Health Care | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Is looking hard for things to be wrong a good way to promote health?

 

EARLY diagnosis has become one of the most fundamental precepts of modern medicine. It goes something like this: The best way to keep people healthy is to find out if they have (pick one) heart disease, autism, glaucoma, diabetes, vascular problems, osteoporosis or, of course, cancer — early. And the way to find these conditions early is through screening...continued.

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CDC Turns From Zombies to 'Outbreak' iPad App

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the folks who brought the world a controversial zombie apocalypse campaign,  has launched a free iPad app that lets users play a game to stem a fictitious epidemic.
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Sense of Taste Changes With Age

Sense of Taste Changes With Age | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
If food does not seem to taste as good as it used to, the problem may be that you are losing your sense of smell as you get older.

 

They are a ghastly orange color when they tumble out of their crinkly package with its flamelike logo, and salt mines and chemical plants may come to mind when you eat the first one, but, man, those tortilla chips are tasty. Or maybe it’s just that you can actually taste them. Because sorry, Charlie: as we get older, there may come a time when we find ourselves drawn not to food with good taste or food that tastes good but simply to food that has any flavor at all...continued

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Twitter app takes on public health | Healthcare IT News

Twitter app takes on public health | Healthcare IT News | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON – Twitter, the much beloved social networking site, is set to take on disease outbreaks, after HHS officials announced the release of a new Web-based application tool available to public health officials.

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No yolk: eating the whole egg as dangerous as smoking?

No yolk: eating the whole egg as dangerous as smoking? | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Just as you were ready to tuck into a nice three-egg omelet again, comforted by the reassuring news that eggs are not so bad for you, here comes a study warning that for those over 40, the number of egg yolks consumed per week accelerates the...
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Navigating the Labyrinth of Medical Costs - Your Money

Navigating the Labyrinth of Medical Costs - Your Money | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it

image: Daniel Rosenbaum for The New York Times

 

Jean Poole, a medical billing advocate, combs through bills to find errors.

 

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD
Published: June 22, 2012

 

How do hospitals and doctors arrive at the fees they charge? The not-so-simple answer is that it depends on what sort of deal their medical provider has negotiated with their insurer.

 

Ask Jean Poole, a medical billing advocate, about her work helping people navigate the bewildering world of medical bills and insurance claims, and the stories pour out. There’s the client who was billed almost $11,000 for an 11-minute hand surgery. The cancer patient who was charged $9,550.40 for a round of chemotherapy he never received.

 

And then, there’s the tale of the woman who came to Ms. Poole with a large rolling suitcase stuffed with bills for her 68-year-old husband, who had gone to the emergency room after he fell getting out of bed. The hospital’s doctors discovered a series of problems — kidney failure, blood and urinary tract infections, and a blood clot. Ultimately, he ended up staying in the hospital for two months and being transferred to a nursing home for rehabilitation.

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Why Medical Bills Are a Mystery

Why Medical Bills Are a Mystery | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Until we figure out the true costs of delivering health care to patients, we can’t make the system more efficient.
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Geriatric Emergency Units Opening at U.S. Hospitals

Geriatric Emergency Units Opening at U.S. Hospitals | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan has joined a number of medical centers around the country in creating a special emergency room for geriatric patients.
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Older Women Struggle to Make Ends Meet

Older Women Struggle to Make Ends Meet | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Sixty percent of older women in the United States do not have enough income to cover basic expenses without help, even if they are married, according to a report.

 

By SHAILA DEWAN

 

The United States is aging, and a new report from Wider Opportunities for Women sheds some light on what that may mean and underscores the importance of saving for retirement.

Sixty percent of women in the United States who are 65 or older do not have enough income to cover basic expenses without help, even if they are married, according to the report.

 

That is compared to 41 percent of men in that age group...continued...

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Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’?

Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’? | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
What science tells us about the incredible shrinking childhood.

 

By ELIZABETH WEIL
Published: March 30, 2012

 

One day last year when her daughter, Ainsley, was 9, Tracee Sioux pulled her out of her elementary school in Fort Collins, Colo., and drove her an hour south, to Longmont, in hopes of finding a satisfying reason that Ainsley began growing pubic hair at age 6. Ainsley was the tallest child in her third-grade class. She had a thick, enviable blond-streaked ponytail and big feet, like a puppy’s. The curves of her Levi’s matched her mother’s...continued

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‘Iceman’ Had Brown Eyes and Hair, and Was Lactose Intolerant

‘Iceman’ Had Brown Eyes and Hair, and Was Lactose Intolerant | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Researchers have sequenced the complete genome of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman, and discovered that he had brown eyes and brown hair, was lactose intolerant and had Type O blood.
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Diet Soft Drinks Linked to Risk of Heart Disease

Diet Soft Drinks Linked to Risk of Heart Disease | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it

By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
Published: February 27, 2012

 

A study of 2,564 adults found a link, even when controlling for other variables. But researchers caution against alarm, saying the reason for the link is not clear.

 

Some studies have suggested that consumption of diet soft drinks may be associated with Type 2 diabetes and development of the condition known as metabolic syndrome — high blood pressure, abdominal obesity and other risk factors. Now a 10-year epidemiological study has found a link between diet soft drinks and cardiovascular disease.

 

The analysis, published online in The Journal of General Internal Medicine, included 2,564 adults over 40 living in Manhattan. Researchers found that diet and regular soft drink consumption were both associated with a number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

 

Even after controlling for many of those risks, including diabetes, the researchers found that daily consumption of diet soda was still independently associated with an increased risk for stroke, heart attack and death. The reasons for the association are unclear, the authors said, and the results must be interpreted with caution.

 

“The message for diet soft drink drinkers is not to be alarmed,” said the lead author, Hannah Gardener, an epidemiologist at the University of Miami. “What we’ve found is an association, and it might be due to chance or other unmeasured variables.”

Still, she added, if people stop drinking diet soda, they “are not going to be missing out on any important vitamins or minerals.”

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Cocktail of Popular Drugs May Cloud Brain

Cocktail of Popular Drugs May Cloud Brain | Public Health and Your Health | Scoop.it
Studies find that the cumulative use of drugs that are among dozens of common painkillers, antihistamines and psychiatric medications has been linked to cognitive impairment.

 

By RONI CARYN RABIN

 

Many people are unaware that dozens of painkillers, antihistamines and psychiatric medications — from drugstore staples to popular antidepressants — can adversely affect brain function, mostly in the elderly. Regular use of multiple medications that have this effect has been linked to cognitive impairment and memory loss.

 

Called anticholinergics, the drugs block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, sometimes as a direct action, but often as a side effect. Acetylcholine is a chemical messenger with a range of functions in the body, memory production and cognitive function among them...continued.

 

 

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