Public Education Vs. Home School
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Paul Kamara Sekou Collins Review of Michelle Fine and Lois Weis Silenced Voices and Extraordinary Conversations: Re-Imagining Schools. New York, NY: Teachers College Press

Paul Kamara Sekou Collins Review of Michelle Fine and Lois Weis Silenced Voices and Extraordinary Conversations: Re-Imagining Schools. New York, NY: Teachers College Press | Public Education Vs. Home School | Scoop.it
Andrew Dunn's insight:

Collins, Paul. "Fine, Michelle & Weis, Lois. (2003). Silenced Voices Extraordinary Conversations: Re-Imagining Schools. New York, NY: Teachers College Press" Richard A. Quantz. Oxford, Ohio. Paul Kamara Sekou Collins. Web. 30 March 2014.

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The Problem With Homeschooling

Problems with Homeschooling from a Feminist point-of-view

Andrew Dunn's insight:

Anne, Libby. "The Problem With Homeschooling." Web log post. Love Joy Feminism. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2014.

 

Libby Anne's blog post concerning problems with homeschooling brings up a few interesting points when it comes to the drawbacks of homeschooling. This opinion is also written by an avid feminist so her examples are based on Christian Patriarchies. She mentions how homeschooling allows parents to not only monitor their children 24/7 but also to "shelter" them. This restricts most forms of social exploration due to not having an avenue to meet new people every day. She also states how home schooling parents act as if public school is rife with drugs, rampant sex and heavy drinking. This, as she states, is far from the truth. She also feels as if children who home school do not get an education as good as public school children get. Female home school children even feel pressured by their parents to conform to an idea of what a woman "should" be not what they "want" to be.

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The real 21st-century problem in public education

The real 21st-century problem in public education | Public Education Vs. Home School | Scoop.it
New data shows the problem getting worse.
Andrew Dunn's insight:

Strauss, Valerie. "The Real 21st-century Problem in Public Education." The Real 21st-century Problem in Public Education. The Washington Post, 26 Oct. 2013. Web. 30 Mar. 2014.

 

            Strauss' editorial discusses the problems facing the current school systems and why they are failing. Since there is now more pressure on getting students into college to earn a four year degree, it creates a ripple effect that is felt by the students. The pressure on test scores and getting into college has caused an increase in student poverty. She mentions that in 2000, students who were eligible for free/reduced priced meals, made up at least half of the student body in 4 states. She feels that to combat this, we should focus more on how we used to teach students. By not only challenging them, but by also providing more funding for programs that support a creative mind, such as music and theater. These problems keep compounding year after year and the educational system is failing because of it. If we can fix the student poverty problem in public schools, then not only would we see an increase in academic achievement, but also they may end up having the same level of achievement as home schooled students. 

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The Professors 605 - Home Schooling - YouTube

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"The Professors 605 - Home Schooling." YouTube. YouTube, 16 Nov. 2012. Web. 30 Mar. 2014.

 

This video is a round-table of a couple professors and a couple home schooling parents. They discuss the importance of home schooling as well as the reason why people choose to home school. Brandie Booker, a professor as well as a home schooling mom, talk about why she had to home school her son. She mentions how he was always singled out in school and how his peers used to be aggressive towards him. Because of this, he began to lash out in school which caused his grades to suffer. Yvonne, one of the home school moms, says that she decided to home school her daughter because faculty at the kindergarten that she was attending was saying "you shouldn't be pressuring to read so soon." The daughter had actual chosen to learn to read at the age of two and enjoyed doing it. There was no pressure from her mother. Nick Panomitros, a college professor, brought up the point that social interactions between multiple peers of the same age group is much more beneficial than only being surrounded by one or two parents all the time. These social interactions teach the child how to deal with other people. This video provides a very balanced view of the pros and cons of home schooling.

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Academic Achievement of Homeschool and Public School Students and Student P...: EBSCOhost

Andrew Dunn's insight:

Barwegen, Laura, Nancy Falciani, Junlah Putnam, Megan Reamer, and Esther Stair. "Academic Achievement of Homeschool and Public School Students and Student Perception of Parent Involvement." School Community Journal 14.1 (2004): 39-58. EBSCO. Web. 30 Mar. 2014. 

 

            This was a study done on academic achievement with concern to parental involvement in a child's life. The researchers were attempting to find a viable comparison between public school educated children and home schooled children. They used ACT scores to determine a child's academic achievement. To quantify the parental involvement, they used not only the child's perception of parental involvement, but also parental perception of involvement. They found that children with higher levels of parental involvement had higher ACT scores on average than students with lower levels of parental involvement. The students with the most amount of parental involvement were the home schooled children and the ones with lower amounts of parental involvement were the public school children. There were a few discrepancies when it came to the parental/student perception surveys. Only 23 of the 127 total parental surveys were returned. Of those, a few of the child perception surveys were different by a fair margin compared to the corresponding parental survey. Even with the margin for error, the researchers believe that home school children have a higher academic achievement than public school children because of the high levels of parental involvement.

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Measuring School Improvement-Podcast

(Had to upload to soundcloud to link it)

Andrew Dunn's insight:

Hargreaves, Andy, and Henry Braun. "Measuring School Improvement." Audio blog post. American Radio Works. American Radio Works, 19 Nov. 2013. Web. 30 Mar. 2014.

 

            This podcast brought in two professors who brought to light problems with the current public school system. They mention how there are too many schools that focus more on getting children out of school so their graduation rate goes up, rather than helping those children become educated members of society. They also mention how there is very little accountability for teachers who are not teaching children effectively. They talk about a couple ways of improving school systems so they are more effective. They mention how accountability systems would be major boon to public schools. These systems provide rewards for teachers who do exceptionally well, and punish teachers who simply do not teach and just attempt to get the children out of school. Standardized test scores are also slightly skewed when it comes to academic success. Since all standardized tests are multiple choice, rather than something more engaging like short answer or even fill in the blank, there is a chance that those test scores do not accurately represent the child's knowledge of the subject. Many times, the child simply makes an educated guess. The problems presented, as well as the No Child Left Behind Act, are causing a degradation of academic ability in today's youth. Without proper fixes, we may have many more uneducated adults in the future.

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A054_Statistics.jpg (350×280)

A054_Statistics.jpg (350×280) | Public Education Vs. Home School | Scoop.it
Andrew Dunn's insight:

Graph showing public school achievement vs home school achievement. Digital image. Tradition In Action, 3 Jan. 2013. Web. 30 Mar. 2014. 

 

            This graph shows the levels of academic achievement of home schooled children compared to public school children. The scores reflect the national percentile of academic achievement when it comes to different general areas of education. Public school children were in the 50th percentile in all areas. Whereas home schooled children were among the highest with the lowest percentile only being 84%. Many researchers believe that this is due to parental involvement in a child's education. It stands to reason that if home schooled children have so much one-on-one time with their "teacher" then they will inevitably have higher scores. Whereas if public school students had higher parental involvement they might achieve higher scores as well. The only cause for concern with the graph is how it may be skewed. The creator of the graph, Dr. Brian D. Ray is an avid home school supporter. He has written many essay and papers with concern to the academic achievement of home schooled children. With this bias in mind, the scores may be slightly exaggerated.

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Defending Public Schools

Defending Public Schools | Public Education Vs. Home School | Scoop.it
Andrew Dunn's insight:

Vinson, Kevin D., and E. Wayne Ross. Defending Public Schools. Westport, Conn: Praeger Publishers, 2004. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 30 Mar. 2014. 

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Research Facts on Homeschooling | Research

The National Home Education Research Institute's mission is to: Produce high-quality homeschooling research, serve as a clearinghouse of research for the public, researchers, homeschoolers, the media, and policy makers, and educate the public concerning the findings of all research on home education.
Andrew Dunn's insight:

Ray, Brian D. "National Home Education Research Institute." Research Facts on Homeschooling. National Home Research Education Institute, 1 Jan. 2014. Web. 27 Mar. 2014. 

 

            Brian D. Ray's research on home schooling shows many of the pros of this type of schooling. He mentions how students who home school perform 15-30% better than their public school counterparts. Many people who are against home schooling say that the parent's knowledge as well as income effect the education the child receives. This is not the case because it is based not only on the child's aptitude, but also the parents ability to teach. The actual knowledge of the particular subjects comes from the books themselves. More than likely the parent is a better teacher due to the relationship between mother/father to son/daughter. Studies have also shown that children who are home schooled have sound psychological and mental acuity as well as healthy social interactions. Many adults who were home schooled also seem to contribute more to society than the general population. They are more likely to vote on local or national matters, participate in local community service, and go to and succeed at college. These bullet points bring to light many pros that are generally not talked about when it comes to home schooling.

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One-third of U.S. Adults Know Someone Who Homeschools Their Child; Two-thirds of adults cite dissatisfaction with academic instruction as a main reason why they think parents in general or they the...

Andrew Dunn's insight:

"One-third of U.S. Adults Know Someone Who Homeschools Their Child; Two-thirds of adults cite dissatisfaction with academic instruction as a main reason why they think parents in general or they themselves homeschool their children ." PR Newswire US. (April 14, 2006 Friday 5:29 PM GMT ): 1732 words. LexisNexis Academic. Web. Date Accessed: 2014/03/30.

 

            PR Newswire interviewed many adults with concern to education and home schooling. Many adults who either home school their children or why they might want to cite three different examples. One of which is dissatisfaction with the academic instruction when it comes to their children. A massive 65% felt that that the academic institutions were not teaching the parent(s)' children up to their standards. 60% even stated it was due to lack of religious or moral instruction. Finally, 53% stated they were concerned about safety on the school bus. The author also uses political party affiliation to further define the interviewees. He determined that republicans (69%) would home school their children because of the lack of religious or moral instruction in schools. Democrats (44%) say that they have problems with the public education system because of overcrowding in public schools. This report shows that public perception of the educational system is partially based on party affiliation, and with this, can be viewed as a political issue.

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