Public Communications Management (PCM)
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Public Communications Management (PCM)
The public management model for information, collaboration and decision making
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PCM Strategies » Blog Archive » 2013: Three challenges for governments & community foundations

PCM Strategies » Blog Archive » 2013: Three challenges for governments & community foundations | Public Communications Management (PCM) | Scoop.it
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Final 2012 post from my blog, aheadofideas.com

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Public Communications Management (PCM) – The Public Sector's “M” model

Public Communications Management (PCM) – The Public Sector's “M” model | Public Communications Management (PCM) | Scoop.it

CRM, BPM, KM, ECM. These are the abbreviations of new electronic management or “M” models that have emerged with the growth of the Internet. They relate to the management of traditional business practices ranging from customer relations to knowledge to business assets that are now enabled electronically through the Web and complimentary devices. Their use has rapidly expanded and automated these processes within companies and organizations increasing their impact and importance to the overall enterprise.


While there has been some adoption of these solutions in federal, state and local governments, they are found mostly in the private sector used by the companies for which they were designed to find new ways to use the Internet to manage business processes and to connect with customers. It seems that many electronic platforms government has adopted were initially designed for the private sector which is unencumbered by restraints (real and perceived) that have enabled fuller utilization of the Web and social media.


I’ve suggested that government must “work within guardrails” where the private sector can set its own barriers or ignore them. The Internet did not create these challenges for government. However, the Internet has certainly magnified them. They arise from a historical, political and legal structure and established standards and processes. The Internet is unstructured, lacks standards, attribution and validation, and is incredibly fast and far reaching. Governments are inherently slow and advance incrementally. It’s in their design to be and act as bureaucracies.


Where private companies can choose between online or off line environments for internal and external communication and information sharing, governments have to have and keep a foot in both at the same time. And while strides have been made, government has yet to realize the full impact and benefits that are possible for managing internal organizational processes and structuring and solving their most important challenge: engaging citizens online.


Excellent examples can be found at the local, state and federal levels of innovative solutions from dedicated public employees and technology companies who are finding solutions while accommodating these challenges. And since most of the challenges are unique to the public sector, e.g., government, public organizations and non-profits, and centers around communication and information sharing, perhaps it’s time to establish a management or “M” process that relates specifically to the public sector and its organizations that are unique and outside the realm of for-profit entities.


My suggestion is “PCM” or Public Communications Management as the emerging management model for information, communication, collaboration and decision making. PCM is prevalent among public organizations, non-profits, and government. Its focus is on the processes surrounding the gathering and dissemination of information (including data), communicating that information, deliberation and outcomes. Each of these processes contains challenges to improve the quality and quantity of the various components and networks (people, groups and organizations) involved to convey information and to administer deliberative processes.


Based on this description, one could argue that PCM includes other “M” or management processes such as KM, IM, and CRM and so on. This would be accurate. However, the point of PCM is to give the public sector its own umbrella concept to apply these other processes that do move between it and the private sector. PCM is focused on deliverables processes: the quality of information or data, how it is communicated or disseminated; what the internal and external collaboration and deliberation models looks like; and the environment for how decisions are made, i.e., inclusive and transparent.


PCM would relate to today’s economic climate by addressing the many challenges faced by public organizations to redesign processes and operations, decide what programs and services to fund and provide, and how it will interact and engage the public in decision making processes. PCM is also about new technologies and ideas deployed through creative strategies to help public organizations improve the way they collect, manage and share information and then effectively receive and process citizen feedback.


PCM goes beyond designing the technology software and hardware components to focus on how organizations must create their capacity to generate reliable information, build awareness by sharing their content, facilitate informative deliberations across their networks and with diverse audiences, and be able to gather and process that knowledge. The objective of PCM should be to resolve easier and more informed decision making, and with having the ability to more easily identify and determine outcomes from these deliberations.


Public Communications Management is about the ways organizations achieve success by having a greater impact on and provide benefits to their employees, citizens, stakeholders and society.


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‘Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics,’ by Morris P. Fiorina and Samuel J. Abrams and ‘The Disappearing Center: Engaged Citizens, Polarization, and American Democracy,’ ...

‘Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics,’ by Morris P. Fiorina and Samuel J. Abrams and ‘The Disappearing Center: Engaged Citizens, Polarization, and American Democracy,’ ... | Public Communications Management (PCM) | Scoop.it
In “Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics,” Morris P. Fiorina and Samuel J. Abrams argue that our elected officials are more sharply divided than the electorate.
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