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4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back

4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Advice on how to improve one’s self is everywhere.  It accounts for about 2.5% of all book sales in the United States. Add in speeches, training programs, TV programs, online-products, coaches, yoga, and the like, self-help is a $10 billion industry per year, and that’s just in the U.S.

 

However, research shows that much of the advice extolled may be misleading or even wrong. Several myths about performance persist, despite research and practices that show they are half-truths at best. That might explain why the most likely purchasers of self-improvement books have bought another within the previous 18 months.  The first myth-riddled book didn’t work, so they bought another, and maybe another soon after.

 

A recent report in the Journal of Management noted that of nearly 25,000 academic articles on performance, only a fraction include what psychologists call within person variance, which describes ranges, such as that between individuals’ top, average and worst performances. Advice too often mistakenly assumes performance can be compared across people, using the same gauge. That’s absurd.

 

Our observation of hundreds of performance seekers largely confirms the report and has led to delineating a series of myths that hold people back when trying to improve. These assertions are based on a diverse set of fields, including psychology, sports, arts, and leadership. We hope that by dispelling these myths, explaining the reality and offering some sound advice instead, we can help move people toward more effective personal development.


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Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 5, 9:00 AM
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Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology.  [ Also see: http://www.healthforworld.com ]
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Technology Tips Newsletter - Empathy

Technology Tips Newsletter - Empathy | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Tech Tips Newsletter - Empathy Should Become Part of Everyone’s Vocabulary

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 30, 4:51 PM

Do you understand the difference between sympathy and empathy? Interested in free classroom activities for teaching tolerance and empathy? Looking for a way to lead virtual teams? Look here for all this and more. 

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How Smart is today's Artificial Intelligence

How Smart is today's Artificial Intelligence | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
How Smart is today's Artificial IntelligenceCurrent AI is impressive, but it's not intelligent.

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Grengar Pitter's comment, August 13, 10:42 AM
https://bit.ly/2t79MWx
Jacques31's comment, August 18, 3:36 AM
Big data mgt, cpu time, automation , etc... are not intelligence
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Intelligence Unleashed

Intelligence Unleashed | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
This paper is published as part of the Open Ideas at Pearson series. The series features some of the best minds in education - from teachers and technologists, to researchers and big thinkers - to bring their ideas and insights to a wider audience.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 29, 1:07 AM

An interesting look at the future.

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10 Ways to Improve Metacognition in Students

10 Ways to Improve Metacognition in Students | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Metacognition. Termed by the American Psychologist John H. Flavell, in 1979, it’s a combination of two words that best describe its meaning; meta – beyond and cognition – thinking. Going by this conceptualization, simply put, metacognition implies beyond thinking, or thinking about the thinking process.

Components of Metacognition
Metacognition principally involves being aware of one’s current thinking skills, and developing the same to customize the process of learning. The three major components of this process, are:

Metacognitive knowledge - Knowledge and awareness of one’s own cognitive processes.
Metacognitive regulation – Regulation of learning existing cognitive knowledge through regulatory activities and exercises.
Metacognitive experience – Experiences relevant to ongoing attempts at regulation.

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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, July 24, 5:00 AM

 


A very interesting article about metacognition and some ways to entice your learners to ruse it ☺


 

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Teaching Children Empathy Using Social Emotional Learning Theory

Teaching Children Empathy Using Social Emotional Learning Theory | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Teaching empathy and interconnectedness
Help young students recognize the impact of their emotions and actions upon others.

 

Ask: “When you were feeling mad, I noticed that you pulled her hair. How do you think that made her feel?”

 

Or “When you felt embarrassed, you made fun of him. How do you think that made him feel?” According to Dr. Daniel Siegel, author of The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind, “When children are interconnected, in tune with others, and have the capacity to be reflective, it increases empathy and understanding for the self and others.

 

The ability to be reflective and to understand the self and others is what builds resiliency.” Educators can assist students to become reflective about their emotions, empathetic and aware of their relationship to others, and more resilient as a result.


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Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process

Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Take the fear out of feedback with Feedforward


Feed forward. It’s an alternative approach to traditional feedback designed to deliver constructive feedback focusing on a person’s development in the future. Feedback, by its very name, examines the past, which cannot be altered. Feedforward, by contrast, looks ahead at a future potential that is conceivably within our control. Feedback carries judgment and opinion; Feedforward is about people and their development. It’s a positive, future-focused, personal development process that, if used with conventional feedback, can minimize apprehensions or reactions to the latter’s delivery, such as hurt feelings, dissent, friction, and so on.


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David Hain's curator insight, June 7, 6:27 AM

Feedforward - worth considering as a development technique. Exercise example here.

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That's all you've got: 9 Minutes and 59 Seconds to Hook Your Audience 

That's all you've got: 9 Minutes and 59 Seconds to Hook Your Audience  | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists say our brains have a primitive timing system that tunes out after ten minutes.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 1, 1:50 PM

For over 20 years I've been tracking how long it takes people in meetings to pay attention to the presentations being shared -- without a story -- before they zone out.

 

I kept clocking it at 10 minutes.

Now research is backing up my direct experience. Yahoo!

 

Not only does this article give a link to Dr. John Medina's research, it gives 3 solid steps for how to keep everyone engaged. 

 

I've contacted Dr. John Medina, the molecular biologist and will post the link to the research here as soon as I have it.

 

Here's the link to the research that I received from Dr. Medina!

You might want to check out these references, specifically the first one http://www.brainrules.net/pdf/references_attention.pdf and also see this Brain Rules chapter as well http://www.brainrules.net/attention.

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Why People Don't Notice You've Changed | Jesse Lyn Stoner

Why People Don't Notice You've Changed | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Often in coaching, managers work on changing their behaviors. But there’s another area you need to pay attention to also – other’s perceptions of you. Or you can end up in a situation where people don’t notice you’ve changed – where you’ve become a butterfly, but others still see a caterpillar.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 31, 7:06 AM

You've had feedback, been coached, want to change. Some thoughts from @JesseLynnStoner on how you can help others to help you...

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5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance

5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
I’m a hard-nosed realist who used to look at things like visualization as "woo woo" New Age. Little did I know at the time that I could use visualization to achieve top performance and point to solid science to explain why it worked. Achieving my goal was about more than work and discipline; it was also about physiology.


Whenever we use visualization to achieve top performance, our brain releases a neurotransmitter called dopamine. That is the chemical that becomes active when we encounter situations that are linked to rewards from the past. Dopamine enables us to not only see rewards but also to move toward them. So every time we visualize our achievement, our brain stores that information as a success.


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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 6:05 AM

We all have stuff we are scared of. I learned the power of visualisation when I was coached before a walk on hot coals. This brief piece from @LaRaeQuy puts the science and process very well.

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Lateral thinking - Wikipedia | #QuerDenker #StartUPs OUT of #SchoolCocoon #Mentality | #ModernSociety

Lateral thinking - Wikipedia

Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic. The term was promulgated in 1967 by Edward de Bono.

Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.

 

The term was promulgated in 1967 by Edward de Bono. He cites as an example the Judgment of Solomon, where King Solomon resolves a dispute over the parentage of a child by calling for the child to be cut in half, and making his judgment according to the reactions that this order receives.[2] Edward de Bono also links lateral thinking with humour, arguing there's a switchover from a familiar pattern to a new, unexpected one. It is in this moment of surprise that generates laughter and new insight which demonstrates an ability to see a different thought pattern that initially was not obvious.[3]

According to de Bono, lateral thinking deliberately distances itself from the standard perception of creativity as "vertical" logic (the classic method for problem solving).

To understand lateral thinking, it is necessary to compare lateral thinking and critical thinking. Critical thinking is primarily concerned with judging the true value of statements and seeking errors. Lateral thinking is more concerned with the "movement value" of statements and ideas.

 

A person uses lateral thinking to move from one known idea to creating new ideas. Edward de Bono defines four types of thinking tools:

idea-generating tools intended to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo


focus tools intended to broaden where to search for new ideas


harvest tools intended to ensure more value is received from idea generating output


treatment tools that promote consideration of real-world constraints, resources, and support

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Entrepreneurs

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 9, 6:43 PM

Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.

 

The term was promulgated in 1967 by Edward de Bono. He cites as an example the Judgment of Solomon, where King Solomon resolves a dispute over the parentage of a child by calling for the child to be cut in half, and making his judgment according to the reactions that this order receives.[2] Edward de Bono also links lateral thinking with humour, arguing there's a switchover from a familiar pattern to a new, unexpected one. It is in this moment of surprise that generates laughter and new insight which demonstrates an ability to see a different thought pattern that initially was not obvious.[3]

According to de Bono, lateral thinking deliberately distances itself from the standard perception of creativity as "vertical" logic (the classic method for problem solving).

To understand lateral thinking, it is necessary to compare lateral thinking and critical thinking. Critical thinking is primarily concerned with judging the true value of statements and seeking errors. Lateral thinking is more concerned with the "movement value" of statements and ideas.

 

A person uses lateral thinking to move from one known idea to creating new ideas. Edward de Bono defines four types of thinking tools:

idea-generating tools intended to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo


focus tools intended to broaden where to search for new ideas


harvest tools intended to ensure more value is received from idea generating output


treatment tools that promote consideration of real-world constraints, resources, and support

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Entrepreneurs

 

aarthi's comment, April 10, 3:31 AM
Very useful
Karen Quintero's curator insight, April 22, 2:41 AM
 From my point of view, lateral thinking must be taken into account in real education and life because different from critical thinking it allows that the brain make deep thinking about questioning, analizing current cultural patterns that society present currently.It not also promotes deep thinkind, it promotes creativity and motivation because its goal is based on the prior knowledge learners or people will come up with new ideas about the same topic.
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4 ways to thrive in the robotic age without losing your humanity

4 ways to thrive in the robotic age without losing your humanity | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

“How to Thrive in the Robotic Age Without Losing Your Humanity“ was not your typical bloated enterprise keynote. In around 30 minutes, Tim Leberecht jolted an audience of operations experts at HfS FORA New York City.

Though I have some minor intellectual quarrels with Leberecht (more on that in a bit), he places machines and humans at a crossroads we need to reckon with. He also has unusual advice for enterprises, with an unexpected concept – bringing romance to business. Leberecht, who is the Co-Founder and Co-CEO of The Business Romantic Society, has honed his thinking via a bestselling book on the business of romance, and a highly viewed TED talk.

Mix operations and romance at your peril. Leberecht joked:


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This is Why Asking Meaningful Questions Really Matters

This is Why Asking Meaningful Questions Really Matters | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Since the very beginning we have asked questions, and asking meaningful questions matters more than achieving right answers. You heard that right, and here's why.

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The one crucial skill our education system is missing | #Empathy #EmotionalIntelligence

The one crucial skill our education system is missing | #Empathy #EmotionalIntelligence | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

From Blade Runner to I, Robot, the big screens of Hollywood have predicted the rise of the machine. Automated intelligences will wait our tables and drive our cabs. They will serve us by performing menial tasks. But fact is now surpassing fiction. Automation has moved beyond the factory assembly line as computers are diagnosing illnesses, providing legal counsel, and make financial and political decisions. And if artificial intelligence really is faster, smarter and more reliable, what are we left with?

The answer is precisely that element which makes us less efficient and slower. Our humanity. But rather than being seen as a weakness, this is actually our strongest suit. It’s one we need to empower, because studies show that as the world becomes increasingly automated, computerised and digitalised, we are losing the very skills that define us as human. Just when we need them the most.

Our empathy is something that computers will always struggle to emulate. We need to celebrate what makes us different from even the smartest of the machines. While the future belongs to those who are able to navigate this increasingly digitalised world of ours, the choicest spoils will fall to those who can combine technological fluency with emotional intelligence.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Empathy

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Emotional+intelligence

 


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Sirpa Vellonen-Myllylä's curator insight, March 11, 9:37 AM

Finally I can see this topic emerge in public discussion about education - something I've been privately preaching about. 

Felipe Rincon's curator insight, March 14, 8:22 PM
It is very interesting the way in which this article emphasizes the importance of empathy and the other characteristics belonging to the human being in our society, also how that characteristics distance us from machines. I think that the implementation of methodologies that take into consideration this aspects in education in general will contribute to the comprehensive citizens education. The appropriate combination of technological fluency with emotional intelligence should be one of the goals in modern education
Patrice McDonough's curator insight, March 15, 11:49 AM
Who knew our humanity would be buried under the weight of automated intelligences.  Overtaking #EmotionalIntelligence!!
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The Role Of Artificial Intelligence In Learning

The Role Of Artificial Intelligence In Learning | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Wondering what the role of Artificial Intelligence In Learning really is? Check what the role of Artificial Intelligence In Learning is and how to use it.

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Emotions Directly Influence Learning and Memory Processes

Emotions Directly Influence Learning and Memory Processes | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking new study at the University of Haifa has found for the first time that emotions are not only the product of the processing of information by the brain, but that they also directly influence processes of learning and memory in the brain. Dr. Shlomo Wagner of the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa, who undertook the study, explains: “It turns out that different emotions cause the brain to work differently and on distinct frequencies.”

The main goal of the new study, which was published this February in the prestigious science journal eLife, was to identify the electrical activity that takes place in the brain during the formation of social memory. During the course of their work, the researchers – Dr. Wagner and Ph.D. Alex Tendler – discovered the scientific explanation behind the saying “you never get a second chance to make a first impression.” More importantly, they came to understand the connection between emotions and cognitive processes such as learning and memory.

-------------------------------------------

“It seems that when the emotion is social and positive, the brain tells the different areas to work according to one communication protocol. When a different emotion is involved, such a negative emotion of fear as in our experiment, the brain tells the same areas to use a different communication protocol. We will need to conduct additional studies, including studies on humans, in the future in order to understand the precise ramifications of each emotion on memory. But in broad terms,” Dr. Wagner concludes, “the implication is clear. Different emotions cause the brain to work differently, including in terms of cognitive processes such as learning and memory.”

 


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Teaching Empathy in Classrooms

Teaching Empathy in Classrooms | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
When the discussion for education system serving a wider purpose than academics arises, focus is often laid on the overall development of a student, entailing physical, mental and emotional health. Emotional development plays a major role in assisting intellectual growth. One such important aspect of emotional development, holding the power

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 27, 8:15 AM

Something close to my own heart.

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Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Education is the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits throughout various methods like teaching, training, and researching. psychology on the other hand is the scientific study of the mind and behavior. It seeks the complete understanding of the brain’s properties. Psychology is divided into many fields and specialties like forensic psychology, industrial psychology, sports psychology, and most importantly (for the purpose of this article) educational psychology.


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How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans?

How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans? | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans?

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Alex Mak's curator insight, June 8, 11:58 PM
Artificial Intelligence
lemonlawlawyers's comment, June 9, 4:43 AM
good
Richard Platt's curator insight, June 9, 10:38 AM

How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans

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Effective Strategies for Behavioral Interventions in Defiant Children —

Effective Strategies for Behavioral Interventions in Defiant Children — | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
This Tutor in Tinseltown blog article by Stephanie Ortega discusses behavioral interventions including reinforcement, punishment, and extinction. It also covers research on using praise and negative feedback with young children and adolescents.
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5 Steps To Rewrite Negative Self Talk

5 Steps To Rewrite Negative Self Talk | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
In today's world, we are bombarded constantly with marketing imagery intent on cutting down our self esteem. This Tutor in Tinseltown blog article by Stephanie Ortega discusses negative self talk and provides readers with five easy steps to follow towards rewriting this negative internal chatter.
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Developing 21st Century Skills: Metacognition

Developing 21st Century Skills: Metacognition | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Metacognition is the recognition and understanding a person has of his or her own thoughts. Through carving out time in class for building metacognition skills, teachers will help students understand the reasons they perceive concepts in certain ways. When students have a firm grasp of their own thought processes, they will learn how to work through problems efficiently by using this knowledge.


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The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership

The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
How do you figure out the right thing to do? More importantly, how do you develop the habit of making better decisions, time and time again, even in difficult and uncertain circumstances?

Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to learn what happens at moments of choice inside the human mind (the locus of mental activity) and the brain (the physical organ associated with that activity). If you understand these dynamics and how they affect you and those around you, you can set a course toward more effective patterns of thinking and action. You can replicate those beneficial patterns, at a larger scale, in your organization. Over time, this practice can help you take on a quality of strategic leadership: inspiring others, helping organizations transcend their limits, and navigating enterprises toward lofty, beneficial goals.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 19, 7:44 AM

Knowing how your brain works can help you to direct your mind towards better strategic decisions. Useful explanation here.

John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 22, 5:22 PM

Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to learn what happens at moments of choice inside the human mind (the locus of mental activity) and the brain (the physical organ associated with that activity). If you understand these dynamics and how they affect you and those around you, you can set a course toward more effective patterns of thinking and action.

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How AI Has Already Changed Your Life

How AI Has Already Changed Your Life | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

For some people, artificial intelligence still makes them feel a little…uneasy. It’s often depicted as sinister-looking robots who will take over our lives and our jobs, or even replace humanity. 

The reality is, we are already in an age in which AI is infused into our everyday lives in ways that augment rather than replace people. Digital assistants such as Cortana can find you the closest restaurant, dictate a text to your friend, manage your email inbox and even help you create more beautiful PowerPoint presentations.  Whether you realise it or not, AI is an integral part of all these interactions. And while it’s not something you can often see or touch, I bet you’re already experiencing the benefits of AI every day.

So, how does AI technology actually work? AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital. AI uses sophisticated algorithms to sort through piles of data, spot patterns and make predictions – tasks that would be repetitive and time-consuming, if not practically impossible, for people to do manually. AI can do this work on our behalf and give us back more of life’s most precious commodity - time.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 30, 2:40 AM

For some people, artificial intelligence still makes them feel a little…uneasy. It’s often depicted as sinister-looking robots who will take over our lives and our jobs, or even replace humanity. 

The reality is, we are already in an age in which AI is infused into our everyday lives in ways that augment rather than replace people. Digital assistants such as Cortana can find you the closest restaurant, dictate a text to your friend, manage your email inbox and even help you create more beautiful PowerPoint presentations.  Whether you realise it or not, AI is an integral part of all these interactions. And while it’s not something you can often see or touch, I bet you’re already experiencing the benefits of AI every day.

So, how does AI technology actually work? AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital. AI uses sophisticated algorithms to sort through piles of data, spot patterns and make predictions – tasks that would be repetitive and time-consuming, if not practically impossible, for people to do manually. AI can do this work on our behalf and give us back more of life’s most precious commodity - time.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 31, 5:43 AM
Félünk (félünk?) a mesterséges intellingenciától, pedig különböző szintű megjelenési formáit full használjuk... az átalakulás, a változás folyamatos, az is lesz, hol lineáris, hol helyenként ugrásszerű, de hozzászokni már elkezdtünk... nem a távoli jövő az, amikor majd egyszerre csak ránk ugrik, mint egy tigris...:-)))
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 31, 5:47 AM
“...AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital...” - The AI is already makes a part of our daily life... it gives time for us to become acclimatized to it...
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How To Train Yourself To Take Feedback Well

How To Train Yourself To Take Feedback Well | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

With all the “be your best self now!” hullabaloo, we can get overwhelmed with what we think we should be doing. We can drive ourselves crazy thinking about all the things we could do to make ourselves smarter, stronger, better. Not long ago, I actually found myself surrounded by whiteboards sketching out all of my self-improvement plans for the year, kanban board style.

 

And while goals and growth plans are great, sometimes the best ideas for change come from an awareness outside of ourselves. I know, it sounds weird to hear a leadership coach telling you to look for something outside of yourself. I’m all about tuning into that courageous and all-knowing voice who can tout your fabulousness–it’s good stuff. But let’s get real: Sometimes the only way to get perspective about what needs to change comes from an outside perspective. Yes, believe it or not, there is often a gap between who we desire and think we are presenting to the world, and the way others see us.

 

Turns out that when you ask the people around you–the ones who see you in action every day and are impacted by the choices you make–where you can grow, their ideas might be a little different than your own.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 21, 5:56 PM

Receiving feedback is hard. Here are some tips on how you can be better at it.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, March 22, 7:41 AM
Every woman likes to support her husband to face his financial status by working at home in her spare time. 
Get some jobs https://goo.gl/vMRkLG here which you can do at your house in your spare time. 
Select a job which suits you and starts earning money on online.
 
CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 26, 1:40 AM

The truth is, we can’t always control the feedback we receive; we can only control how we choose to accept and use it. And learning how to use it wisely can be a game changer.

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'Memtransistor' Forms Foundational Circuit Element to Neuromorphic Computing

'Memtransistor' Forms Foundational Circuit Element to Neuromorphic Computing | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Computers that operate more like the human brain than computers—a field sometimes referred to as neuromorphic computing—have promised a new era of powerful computing.

While this all seems promising, one of the big shortcomings in neuromorphic computing has been that it doesn’t mimic the brain in a very important way. In the brain, for every neuron there are a thousand synapses—the electrical signal sent between the neurons of the brain. This poses a problem because a transistor only has a single terminal, hardly an accommodating architecture for multiplying signals.

Now researchers at Northwestern University, led by Mark Hersam, have developed a new device that combines memristors—two-terminal non-volatile memory devices based on resistance switching—with transistors to create what Hersam and his colleagues have dubbed a “memtransistor” that performs both memory storage and information processing.

This most recent research builds on work that Hersam and his team conducted back in 2015 in which the researchers developed a three-terminal, gate-tunable memristor that operated like a kind of synapse.

Via Ashish Umre
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Félix Santamaria's curator insight, March 16, 5:15 AM
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