Psychological Approach Maslow
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Psychological Approach Maslow
Psychology, Needs, Maslow
Curated by Sarah McComb
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Overview of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs lays out the basic needs that all people have, and explains the higher needs that appear once those have been fulfilled. This video from About.com will explain Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.
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Maslow | Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow | Hierarchy of Needs | Psychological Approach Maslow | Scoop.it
Maslow (1954) stated that human motivation is based on people seeking fulfilment and change through personal growth. Maslow described self-actualized people as those who were fulfilled and doing all they were capable of.
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Rachael Grant's curator insight, February 26, 2014 9:13 PM

I found this article to be very informative. After briefly discssing Maslow in class, I became more interested in the Hierarchy of Needs. This article discusses not only the original hierarchy but also the expanded version which includes: cognitive, aesthetic, and transcendence needs. This article does not realte the hierarchy directly to education or children, but it explains in more detail the different needs that must be satisfied in order to be motivated to learn.
Obviously there are many different theories when it comes to motivating children; as a future teacher I think it is important to learn a variety of these theories. This way we can motivate students in different ways, and also understand why certain students struggle with lack of motivation.

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A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Abraham Maslow

A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Abraham Maslow | Psychological Approach Maslow | Scoop.it
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David Messer's curator insight, April 4, 2013 10:03 PM

This is a concise account of psychologist Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) and his “hierarchy of needs.” While on the faculty at Brooklyn College he met anthropologist Ruth Benedict and psychologist Max Wertheimer. He was so impressed by their personalities and behaviour that he began studying them. This developed into broader research into what makes a happy, fulfilled person, leading to his theory of a hierarchy of needs.

Maslow theorised that needs could be identified as fitting into a structure like a ladder or hierarchy. At the bottom were basic needs, physical needs like air, water, food and sex. Next came safety needs – having a secure and stable environment. The third level was social needs – things like love, friendship, acceptance etc. The fourth level was what Maslow termed “self-actualising needs”, having a sense of fulfilment, self-worth or a purpose in life.

Maslow believed that if the needs on the lower part of the ladder were not met, then it would be difficult for an individual to have needs on the upper levels met. A starving man, for example, would not be concerned with what others thought of him or the meaning of life.

Maslow’s work has been influential, but in more recent times has been criticised heavily for a lack of empirical research and a Western cultural bias. However, it is still an interesting concept useful for sparking discussion of needs.