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Cliffside Ocean Residence Dramatically Adapted to an Irregular Terrain: Tula House

Cliffside Ocean Residence Dramatically Adapted to an Irregular Terrain: Tula House | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Tula house in Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada, is an example of modern architecture blending in a harsh natural surroundings.

Envisioned by Patkau Architects and perched 44 feet above the Pacific Ocean on a remote island, it reflects the casual irregularity of the sites rock ledges, beach, and forest in both its geometric and spatial order: “The topography of the site is highly irregular; the prospects diverse. Moss covered basalt hills are interspersed among treed expanses and richly vegetated crevices, valleys and swales.”

From a distance, the residence seems to visually fade away into the dark forest. Planted in moss and native ground covers, the continuous roof stands out with its rich geometry. Narrow skylights project lines of light at oblique angles through the inner spaces. “A loose arrangement of concrete walls, clad in staggered fiber-cement panels” define the structure of this unconventional ocean dwelling. A cantilevered wooden deck with steel frames creates a stunning outdoor area for relaxation. The living zone is sober, yet almost hypnotizing with its glazed apertures and incredible views.


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The Floating House by MOS Architects

The Floating House by MOS Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Floating House is the intersection of a vernacular house typology with the shifting site-specific conditions of this unique place: an island on Lake Huron. The location on the Great Lakes imposed complexities to the house’s fabrication and construction, as well as its relationship to site.

Annual cyclical change related to the change of seasons, compounded with escalating global environmental trends , cause Lake Huron’s water levels to vary drastically from month-to-month, year-to-year. To adapt to this constant, dynamic change, the house floats atop a structure of steel pontoons, allowing it to fluctuate along with the lake.


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scarlettarch's curator insight, July 13, 2014 8:23 AM

simple elegant functional

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The Tsunami House by Designs Northwest Architects

The Tsunami House by Designs Northwest Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Designs Northwest Architects have recently completed the Tsunami House, located on Camano Island in Washington State, a waterfront home located on a 3,140 square foot site in a high velocity flood zone.

The 887 square foot main living level is be located 5′ above grade and the foundations are designed on pilings to withstand high velocity tsunami wave action. The lower 748 square foot space is designed with walls able to break away in the event of a storm surge.

The exterior materials of the house are durable and low maintenance; architectural concrete columns are left exposed and the exterior siding is a mixture of composite and galvanized standing seam panels and aluminum windows. The lower level floor is polished concrete with radiant in floor heat and the ceilings are covered with western red cedar to add warmth to the otherwise industrial feeling of the lower level...

 



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16s3d's curator insight, January 4, 2014 6:30 AM

Je reste dubitatif face à la prétention humaine de maîtriser la forece des événements naturels...

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, January 8, 2014 5:40 PM

Tsunami House, located on Camano Island in Washington State, a waterfront home located on a 3,140 square foot site in a high velocity flood zone.

The 887 square foot main living level is be located 5′ above grade and the foundations are designed on pilings to withstand high velocity tsunami wave action. The lower 748 square foot space is designed with walls able to break away in the event of a storm surge.

Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, January 9, 2014 6:06 PM

I'm helping friends on a beach cottage remodel. I counted, it's 132 steps from the beach. I dearly love Oregon's beach cottages. And I equally fear the Cascadia Subduction Zone! This looks awesome and er, expensive. :/

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CCS Control and Servicies Center by Díaz y Díaz Arquitectos

CCS Control and Servicies Center by Díaz y Díaz Arquitectos | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in the middle of the sea, opened to the impressive view of Ría de Ares, the first challenge that assumes the projected building is the landscape.


To respond to this challenge, a formal repertoire is used, based on pure volumes that are integrated in the geometry of the dock and representative of typical forms of naval architecture.

The location required a high standard in terms of structural strength due to the thrust produced by the wind. Similarly, the high salinity of the environment, led to a study in detail of all building systems to prevent premature degradation of materials..


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An Archipelago Getaway by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

An Archipelago Getaway by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
The site is situated on a bed of rock along the edge of Stockholm’s largest archipelago, and the architecture commands views in all directions, to the water ahead and a thicket of greenery behind. A parallelogram in plan, the home angles towards the coast, with a long west facade that drinks in panoramic vistas of the Baltic.
Glass volumes are staggered in a zigzag formation and inset from the lip of the house footprint, creating a deep, shaded patio. Despite its gun-metal color associated with steel, the structure is entirely of wood, from the exterior frame down to the furniture inside. The simple form and the exquisite details all around come together in a rich, nuanced design that more than fulfills the promise of the site...
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Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


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The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain...

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain... | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Rock House replaces an older building at the site and had to be well adjusted to the terrain, both in terms of shape, scale, material and color. The house and terraces are partly built upon existing stone walls, the parts of the walls which are new are made of stones from the blasting at the site. The low elongated volume is cut into to allow for wind shielded outdoor areas, embraced by the house itself. These cuts also bring down the scale of the building, and together with the local variations of the section, make the building relate to the surrounding cliff formations.

On the outer perimeter of terraces and pool, a glass fence also protects against wind, but allows for maximum view. The house is clad with Kebony wood, a sustainable process of treating the wood to allow for good durability towards the exposure to salt water...

 

View the link for more great images of the Rock House...


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JVA's Rabot Tourist Cabin: A Neutral Volume in the Landscape

JVA's Rabot Tourist Cabin: A Neutral Volume in the Landscape | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Rabot Tourist Cabin is one of many DNT (Norwegian Trekking Association) lodging facilities throughout Norway. At 1200 meters above sea level, close to the glacier at Okstindan in northern Norway, the site is spectacular. The weather can be extremely harsh and the structure is constructed for heavy winds and storm.

A secondary rescue hut is placed 50 meters away from the main cabin as a safe shelter in case of destruction of the main cabin. The site inaccessible by road and is only reachable on foot or on skis. The cabin is named after the French glaciologist and geographer Charles Rabot who thoroughly explored the mountain areas in the province of Nordland. It is planned and built with local materials and with great local commitment...


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, September 2, 2014 5:29 AM

Cabina turística en Noruega. Con una unidad de rescate/refugio a 50 metros de la principal y con acceso sólo a pie. 

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Site-Specific Innovation: Çanakkale Antenna Tower by IND and Powerhouse Company

Site-Specific Innovation: Çanakkale Antenna Tower by IND and Powerhouse Company | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The close collaboration of Rotterdam-based practices IND and Powerhouse Company for the design of a new 100-m-tall observation and telecommunications tower in Çanakkale, a Turkish city and seaport located on the southern Asian coast of the Hellespont,  articulates far-reaching technological and programmatic ambitions.

The tower is planned to operate as a broadcast antenna as well as to engage visitors- taking them on a contemplative journey, allowing them time to ponder as they walk along a raised, looping path that runs through the forest before returning to a hilltop observation deck offering panoramic vistas.
Besides its distinctive and aesthetic significance, the tower was conceived with the intention becoming a dynamic public destination, fostering social interactions. The project is all the more interesting as it integrates technologies to a scrupulously context-specific design, respectful of all of the site’s attributes. The architects also harness technological mediums so as to create a heightened architectural experience, appealing the visual and tactile senses.


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Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture

Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Angophora House was designed by Richard Cole Architecture, and it is located in Waverton, a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

“Built over an escarpment in a densely urbanised heritage conservation area in Waverton, the form of this house responds to the difficult site using the elements of cave, platform and canopy. On entering the house from the upper road, one passes through a curvaceous enclosing concrete wall with rooftop garden over.

Two platforms launch into the space of the valley, extending out from the anchoring escarpment. Insulated timber moveable walls transform the space from warm and enclosing to open and unimpeded. A sheltering timber lined roof opens to the north, falls in response to the slope of the land and captures framed views of adjacent Angophora trees.

The escarpment is retained, raw and open to the rooms of the lower ground floor. A dramatic lift takes the owners to the garage on the street below.”


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Quince's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:11 PM

"Utilizing the elements of Cave , Platform, and Canopy"  I haven't heard that one before, but I like it! Very nice open design

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, January 8, 2014 5:50 PM

Preciosa casa en Sydney, con un uso magistral de la madera y el hormigón y una increíble fluidez entre el exterior y el interior.

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Connected to the Landscape: Contemporary Home in Andros, Greece by Klab Architecture

Connected to the Landscape:  Contemporary Home in Andros, Greece by Klab Architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
The country house in the island of Andros sits on a remarkable site of hidden and evident beauty.
With the sloping topography dominant, architects had to follow the path between the trees and to execute a design that would maintain the site as much as possible. The decision was to create a very open house with a protected inner courtyard, designed to maintain privacy and to protect from the elements. The house is situated vertically, with stone retaining walls creating a barrier between the inner space and the country road, allowing views of the city and the sea.
Coming from dense cities, the design highlights the calmness and serenity of the countryside and allows inhabitants to be as close to nature as possible. Large windows bring the outside in, making this beautiful design a house for all seasons...
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Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects

Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Oakpass Residence in Beverly Hillls resembles a sleek modernist box wrapped in floor to ceiling glass, 12 feet above the ground on 10 narrow columns. The structure was elevated to not only circumvent the stringent  setback requirements, but to minimize the impact of development on the beautiful natural site, heavily wooded with oak trees.

This resulted in more light for the interior spaces, views from every room, and more privacy. Also it created a space underneath the house- part carport, part Zen garden. The pool is also elevated on 3 columns and the heavy exterior west facing concrete wall acts as a passive solar heat storage element.

The interior and exterior spaces blend seamlessly into each other due to the use of frameless floor to ceiling glass and a continuity of materials from the inside to the outside.


View more images of this minimalist, passive and site-responsive home at the link...


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Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


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Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in rolling hillsides of Carmel, California, the Caterpillar House is a 2-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom dwelling that implements sustainable features and strategies for minimal development impact.


Feldman Architecture gave the client a home that connects seamlessly with the outdoors, in the form of a modern ranch with strong horizontal lines.

The house is quite literally made from the ground it sits on, with repurposed dirt from the site being used in the building of the walls. The “rammed earth walls” help keep the temperature steady because they act as a thermal mass. The house also utilizes natural ventilation to keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

The roof integrates photovoltaic panels that produce all the required energy, and have been carefully integrated into the design...


View more imagery of the first LEED Platinum Custom Home on the California Central Coast and read the project description at Feldman Architecture.


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