Propaganda
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7 Proven Propaganda Techniques.

7 Proven Propaganda Techniques. | Propaganda | Scoop.it
ASSERTION- Commonly used in advertising. An assertion is an enthusiastic statement presented as fact requiring no explanation or backup. The subjects frequently agree with the statement without searching for additional information or reasoning. BANDWAGON- An appeal to persons to follow the crowd, join the winning side because victory is inevitable. Don't be left out. CARD STACKING- Statements made as authoritative with some truths and many selective omissions (contrary information). It is effective because people recognize a truth, but not the false assertions that are masked. GLITTERING GENERALITIES- Words are used that demand approval without thinking. One can use the term "in defense of democracy" to lure people into unwise actions. Words such as honor, glory, love of country, freedom- may be used for emotional impact to further a self- promoting cause. NAME CALLING- The use of derogatory language or words that carry a negative connotation when describing a perceived enemy. This technique is used when one labels a target connecting him/her with something the public dislikes. The target's name is spoken with sarcasm and ridicule. PINPOINTING THE ENEMY- Simplify complex situations by presenting one specific group or person as the enemy. Once identified, the enemy is wrong, we are right. Everything becomes clear cut. PLAIN FOLKS- Convincing the public that the propagandist's views reflect those of the common person. Local accents, idioms and jokes are used with glittering generalities. ...http://www.propagandacritic.com/articles/index.html ;
Via Jeremy Dahl
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Modern China depicted as colorful, communist paradise by North Korean propaganda artists

Modern China depicted as colorful, communist paradise by North Korean propaganda artists | Propaganda | Scoop.it
China's propaganda posters used to depict idyllic landscapes and rustic villages, but today's scenery resembles something far different. To imagine what modern Chinese propaganda would look like, two British artists commissioned a North Korean group that once made propaganda for their own state, creating a series of paintings that are a mix between eerie dystopias and picturesque scenes pocked by an unsettling feeling. The works are part of a long-running and ongoing series called The Beautiful Future, and they recently finished a showing in Beijing.
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Top 10 weirdest things in Korea | Ladventurers

Top 10 weirdest things in Korea | Ladventurers | Propaganda | Scoop.it
“ A look at just a handful of the weird things within the boundaries of South Korea. There are so many more than this 10 but these are the most noticeable by the expat's”
Via Aránzazu Rodríguez Mederos
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Dennis Rodman From North Korea Speak to CNN - YouTube

“ Former NBA player Dennis Rodman talks exclusively to CNN's Chris Cuomo from North Korea. More from CNN at http://www.cnn.com
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Putin May possibly Be Paying Individuals To Post Pro-Russia Propaganda In Information Story Feedback

Putin May possibly Be Paying Individuals To Post Pro-Russia Propaganda In Information Story Feedback | Propaganda | Scoop.it
British newspaper The Guardian notes that recently, readers have been complaining of pro-Russia propaganda being posted in the comments section of articles about Russia and Ukraine. One reader wrote to The Guardian: One need only pick a Ukraine article at random, pick any point in the comments... http://newsworldtoday.net/putin-may-possibly-be-paying-individuals-to-post-pro-russia-propaganda-in-information-story-feedback/
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Nazi propaganda | 1933-1939

Nazi propaganda | 1933-1939 | Propaganda | Scoop.it
Before World War II, Nazi propaganda strategy, officially promulgated by the Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, stressed several themes. Their goals were to establish external enemies and internal enemies, such as Jews, Romani, homosexuals, Bolsheviks and topics like degenerate art. Hitler and Nazi propagandists played on the anti-Semitism and resentment present in Germany. The Jews were blamed for things such as robbing the German people of their hard work while themselves avoiding physical labour. Der Stürmer, a Nazi propaganda newspaper, told Germans that Jews kidnapped small children before Passover because "Jews need the blood of a Christian child, maybe, to mix in with their Matzah." Posters, films, cartoons, and fliers were seen throughout Germany which attacked the Jewish community, such as the 1940 film The Eternal Jew. Soon after the takeover of power in 1933, concentration camps were established for political opponents. The first people that were sent to the camps were Communists. They were sent because of their ties with the Soviet Union and because Nazism greatly opposed Communism. In 1935, anti-semitic laws in Nazi Germany were introduced known as the Nuremberg Laws, the laws forbid non-Aryans and political opponents of the Nazis from the civil-service and any sexual relations and marriage between people classified as "Aryan" and "non-Aryan" (Jews, Gypsies, blacks). The Nuremberg Laws were based on racial purity, they sought to preserve the Aryan race who were at the top of the Nazi racial hierarchy and were said to be the ubermenschen "herrenvolk" (master race), and to teach the German nation to view the Jews as subhumans. A major political and ideological cornerstone of Nazi policy was the unification of all ethnic Germans living outside of the Reich's borders under one Greater Germany (e.g. Austria and Czechoslovakia). In Mein Kampf, Hitler made a direct remark to those outside of Germany. He stated that pain and misery were being forced upon ethnic Germans outside of Germany, and that they dream of common fatherland. He finished by stating they needed to fight for one's nationality. Throughout Mein Kampf, he pushed Germans worldwide to make the struggle for political power and independence their main focus. Nazi propaganda used the Heim ins Reich policy for this, which began in 1938. Nazi propaganda efforts then focused on creating external enemies. Propagandists strengthened the negative attitude of Germany towards the Treaty of Versailles by territorial claims and ethnocentrism. When the Treaty was signed in 1919 non-propagandists newspapers headlines across the nation spoke German's feelings, such as "UNACCEPTABLE" which appeared on the front page of the Frankfurter Zeitung in 1919. The Berliner Tageblatt, also in 1919, predicted "Should we accept the conditions, a military furore for revenge will sound in Germany within a few years, a militant nationalism will engulf all." Hitler, knowing his nation's disgust with the Treaty, used it as leverage to influence his audience. He would repeatedly refer back to the terms of the Treaty as a direct attack on Germany and its people. In one speech delivered on January 30, 1937 he directly stated that he was withdrawing the German signature from the document to protest the outrageous proportions of the terms. He claimed the Treaty made Germany out to be inferior and "less" of a country than others only because blame for the war was placed on it. The success of Nazi propagandists and Hitler won the Nazi party control of Germany and eventually led to World War II.
Via Photo report
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Photo report's curator insight, November 28, 2013 10:46 AM

This is a collection of Nazi posters from 1933-39. Posters from 1939-1945 are on another page. Many are taken from photographs made by Dr. Robert D. Brooks at the German Federal Archives.

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North Korea-Lifestyle and Culture

North Korea-Lifestyle and Culture | Propaganda | Scoop.it

Via Jake Haras
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Jake Haras's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:03 AM

Most of North Korea, is rural and poverty stricken, and even those that visit the capital Pyongyang have noted that while the streets are clean, the people are cheerful and well dressed, but everywhere the entire country is lacking in technology and in food. They funnel all the money into their own defense and elite class, causing underdeveloped slums all over the country, even in highly populated cities. Their social structure is dependent on ties to party leaders. Those without party ties have less access to education and careers, The power is a problem in cities and so is the food distribution. Also there is a big problem when it comes to crime which is stealing of food, not anything really serious just people trying to feed their families. Many Cities have black market trading and north Korean Officials say its illegal but people still trade just out of necessity to survive