The promised land of technology
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The promised land of technology
Todays interesting ideas and inventions which I hope will form the future of mankind's technology.
Curated by Miro Svetlik
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Microsoft reveals its server designs and releases open source code

Microsoft reveals its server designs and releases open source code | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Redmond joins Facebook's Open Compute, intends to make servers more efficient.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Ten years ago I wouldn't believe this would ever happen. As we see even Microsoft is a subject to change. Let's hope it stays so.

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An Introduction to Neuromarketing

An Introduction to Neuromarketing | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
I had a chance to visit Synetiq in Budapest, a rising startup that aims at revolutionizing marketing research by crowdsourced neuromarketing. I liked the approach:
Synetiq is building the world’s first crowdsourced neuromarketing platform.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
Miro Svetlik's insight:

With the rise of wearable eeg scanners (ala this one and Muse) we will see increased amount of applications using neural waves in  analytics. However it will require quite a processing to extract the meaningful information from these data. As we have already seen in other projects, crowdsourcing is certainly way to go when you are short on resources.

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Supercomputer models one second of human brain activity

Supercomputer models one second of human brain activity | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

The most accurate simulation of the human brain to date has been carried out in a Japanese supercomputer, with a single second’s worth of activity from just one per cent of the complex organ taking one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers 40 minutes to calculate.

 

Researchers used the K computer in Japan, currently the fourth most powerful in the world, to simulate human brain activity. The computer has 705,024 processor cores and 1.4 million GB of RAM, but still took 40 minutes to crunch the data for just one second of brain activity.

 

The project, a joint enterprise between Japanese research group RIKEN, the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Forschungszentrum Jülich, an interdisciplinary research center based in Germany, was the largest neuronal network simulation to date.

It used the open-source Neural Simulation Technology (NEST) tool to replicate a network consisting of 1.73 billion nerve cells connected by 10.4 trillion synapses.

 

While significant in size, the simulated network represented just one per cent of the neuronal network in the human brain. Rather than providing new insight into the organ the project’s main goal was to test the limits of simulation technology and the capabilities of the K computer.

 
Via nrip
Miro Svetlik's insight:

It is somehow comforting that we start performing this kind of tests. At least it places current infrastructure in perspective with what we will be facing in biocomputing if we dont change hardware. It would be really interesting to perform the same test on the supercomputer with neuromorphic chips but for that we have to wait a while I guess.

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Just Mind's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:47 AM

This show just how powerful the human brain truly is... very intriguing stuff.

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Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence | MIT Technology Review

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence | MIT Technology Review | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Microchips modeled on the brain may excel at tasks that baffle today’s computers.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Neuromorphic processors will hopefully allow the miniaturization process for robots and smart devices. I still think that bio-computing will be the winner in the end but hey this is quite a leap for cpu industry. We have too long focused only on the raw computing power and this might change it. 

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Telepathwords: preventing weak passwords by reading your mind.

Telepathwords: preventing weak passwords by reading your mind. | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Preventing weak passwords by reading your mind/


Via Beth Dichter
Miro Svetlik's insight:

A really cute password tester for non-geek users. Try it for yourself.

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marc augier's curator insight, December 8, 2013 5:01 AM

Assez inquiétant et destabilisant

Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 8, 2013 2:20 PM

This is really very clever and a great way to get anyone, student or else, to consider password safety. Thanks for sharing.

Nacho Vega's curator insight, January 5, 2014 2:59 PM

Test it!

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If this startup succeeds, you'll only need to charge your phone once a week (exclusive)

If this startup succeeds, you'll only need to charge your phone once a week (exclusive) | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Ardica is developing a thin and flat fuel cell battery, which can give devices seven days worth of run time on a single charge.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

How many great new technologies are being kept secret daily just to serve a human thirst for power. Hopefuly it will be possible in a short time to empower common people with these inventions.

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Connected Air: Smart Dust Is The Future Of The Quantified World

Connected Air: Smart Dust Is The Future Of The Quantified World | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
They call it Smart Dust, but these microscopic sensors could change the way we interact with the world.

Via Alessio Erioli
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Idea of Smart Dust heavily surpasses the concept of Internet of Things. It is still quite unbelievable that this is a technology from 90-ties. Big clouds of motes could soon be flying near us. Let's hope they will be used for good purposes..

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amleto picerno 's curator insight, November 16, 2013 9:11 AM
Smart Dust: The Sensors That Track Every Thing, Everywhere
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Google's build-your-own-phone plan

Google's build-your-own-phone plan | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is a brilliant idea to lower our electronics waste. However they will need to implement component market and takein as well. That is a bit more challenging than this concept.

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IBM unveils prototype of "brain-inspired" computer

IBM unveils prototype of "brain-inspired" computer | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24571219 The human brain is 10,000 times more dense and efficient than any computer today. IBM is using the brain as a design template, including using...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Neuromorphic computing is a first step to combine cognitive and conventional computing in order to have real artificial intelligence. I am really curious how this field of computing will evolve in next 10 years.

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Avegant's head-mounted virtual retinal display offers brilliant definition, we go hands-on (video)

Avegant's head-mounted virtual retinal display offers brilliant definition, we go hands-on (video) | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
We've never seen a product quite like this, and for Avegant, that's very good news. The startup's prototype virtual retinal display (VRD) delivers
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Refractive glasses instead of direct display a cool idea. I am quite curious how they will manage to cut down the size of this prototype in such a short time.

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Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
After the initial Jeopardy excitement, most people forgot about Watson, the first computer ever to pass the Turing Test. But we need to pay attention, and now.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I truly percieve the coming of general AI as a next level in the web. Search providers as we know them must turn into intelligent advisor in place of current brute force query parsers which act more as a librarian. Watson have a headstart here no doubt.

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No Boy Left Behind?

No Boy Left Behind? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Boys have been falling behind girls in academic performance and attainment. Are our boys failing, or are we failing our boys?

Via Beth Dichter
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is so nicely outlined, except the male/female teacher part which I this is a little bit exagurated and impacts more the boys are already missing a father figure at home. The final point is to give much more detailed attention to individual boys in the learning process and as well empower teacher to do so.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:50 PM

For years we have hear "no child left behind" but what do the stats say about the boys? This infographic looks at some of the issues that may be affecting the boys coming through the education system. Are we leaving them behind?

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Yahoo Japan develops 3D search engine-printer

Yahoo Japan develops 3D search engine-printer | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Yahoo Japan Corp. has developed a voice-activated Internet search that links to a 3D printer, letting users look online for blueprints to deliver solid objects in a few minutes, the company said.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

According to this news, we are not that far away from having implemented a Matter Compiler featured in Neal Stephenson's Diamond Age (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diamond_Age).
Oh I really love to live in this century...

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This is What Happens When You Teach Machines the Power of Natural Selection

This is What Happens When You Teach Machines the Power of Natural Selection | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Psychopathic machines? Lethal AI? These are the concepts we should be thinking about when we talk about the benefits of self-improving software. An excerpt from James Barrat’s ‘Our Final Invention’.


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Due to the self organizing nature of the universe the behavior self improving iterative programs can be no other that to try to succeed. The cost of a success can be dear but how we can harness these problems when our own computing unit a brain cannot compete with the speed of iterations? These are quite serious questions facing AI science right now. I hope we will manage to come with some way to influence evolution of AI.

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Cortana Voice Assistant Reportedly Arriving On Lumia Smartphones In April

Cortana Voice Assistant Reportedly Arriving On Lumia Smartphones In April | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
It is remarkable just how silent Microsoft has been on the matter. Almost everything we have heard so far about the rumored Cortana voice assistant has been from unofficial sources. And now famed Micr...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am really curious if this voice assistant will allow hand-off use of wp. It is also questionable in which extent Artificial Intelligence will be used to drive this manager. Microsoft claims to have already some AI in the cloud. Of course all of this will be available at first only in US. 

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Sharing Entanglement without Sending It

Sharing Entanglement without Sending It | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

To challenge the limited understanding of the then-young quantum theory, Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen constructed, in 1935, their EPR Gedankenexperiment, in which they introduced entangled states that exhibit strange correlations over macroscopic distances. By now we have learned that entangled states are an element of physical reality. They lie at the heart of quantum physics and can, in fact, be used as a powerful resource in emerging quantum technologies. Yet we find out in amazement that we have still not completely captured the full scope of the fascinating nature of entanglement. Three different international groups have now reported in Physical Review Letters experiments of distributing entanglement between two distant parties by sending a nonentangled carrier. These arrangements instead place the carrier in a “cheaper,” so-called separable state, which exhibit correlations that can be established remotely between separated parties.

Entanglement is typically characterized by anomalously strong correlations between presently noninteracting parties, typically called Alice and Bob, which have normally interacted in the past. A common setup uses a nonlinear crystal to create an entangled pair of orthogonally polarized photons that are then sent separately, one to Alice and the other to Bob. In the field of quantum information science, the remote establishment of entanglement is key for most applications because it introduces purely nonclassical correlations and the counterintuitive nature of quantum physics. It enables such remarkable tasks as quantum teleportation, efficient quantum communication, fundamental tests of quantum physics, and long-distance quantum cryptography.


Via Alin Velea
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Again a step closer to Quantum Cryptography. It is a time that we will see the commercial implementation of quantum encryption. It will also have quite an impact on Digital currencies which are based on current cryptography. We are living in brave new world.

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Germs That Build Circuits: Biological Self-Assembly Projects

Germs That Build Circuits: Biological Self-Assembly Projects | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
With viruses serving as construction crews and DNA as the blueprint, biotechnology may hold the key to postlithography ICs

 

Biological self-assembly, as this field of research is called, has a compelling appeal. Living creatures produce the most complex molecular structures known to science. Crafted over eons by natural selection, these three-dimensional arrangements of atoms manifest a precision and fidelity, not to mention a minuteness, far beyond the capabilities of current technology. Under the direction of genes encoded in DNA, cells construct proteins that put together the fine structures necessary for life. And now that scientists can alter the genetic codes of microbes with increasing ease and accuracy, more and more research is showing that this same mechanism can be forced to construct and assemble materials critical not to nature necessarily, but to future generations of electronics.

 

Most scientists say the technology will first be used to construct sensors consisting of one or a few nanodevices connected to ordinary silicon circuitry. But that's not what drives the research. Their ultimate ambition is to upend current fabrication methods by genetically engineering microbes to build nanoscale circuits based on codes implanted in their DNA. No more cutting patterns into semiconductor wafers, an increasingly arduous process involving lasers, plasma, exotic gases, and high temperatures in expensive industrial environments. Instead, a room-temperature potion of biomolecules will execute, on cue, a genetically programmed chemical dance that ends in a functioning circuit with nanometer-scale dimensions.

 

In 2001, Belcher and UCSB's Evelyn Hu founded Semzyme (Cambridge, MA), a company that will exploit biological self-assembly to make electronic materials as well as more biotechnology-specific applications, such as long-term storage of DNA. The company is set to begin operations this year and is choosing a first product to bring to market.

 

Big, established companies are taking this research seriously, too. The Army's Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies has attracted sponsorship from Aerospace Corp., Applied Biosystems, Genencor, IBM, SAIC, and Becton Dickinson.

 

Genencor, in particular, took an early interest in bioengineering viruses, forming a $35 million partnership with silicon materials giant Dow Corning in 2001. In the short term, the two firms are merging peptides with silicon-based chemicals to make fabric treatment and cosmetic products. Sensors and other electronics elements are future targets.

 

DuPont, too, is tinkering with bioevolved peptides. According to Tim Gierke, the company has identified one short-term application: purifying carbon nanotubes. Recently, these hollow pipes just a few nanometers wide have been turned into experimental logic circuits and other devices. Depending on the nanotube's structure, it acts as either a semiconductor or a metal. Unfortunately, current methods generate tubes of both types along with a messy soup of soot, and there's no good way of sorting anything out.

 

So DuPont evolved peptides that selectively grab the nanotubes and ignore other forms of carbon. To separate the semiconductors from the metallics, the company turned to another important biomolecule--DNA. DuPont scientists discovered that when a particular form of DNA and carbon nanotubes bind, metallic and semiconducting tubes can, to a degree, be separated using a common laboratory trick.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am watching this field of technology with lot of excitement. Biologically produced circuits will be next big step in our technology. Specially in the nano-size world it is probably most effective way to produce new technology to extend properties of living tissues. Eventually it will change the medicine as we know it.

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Physicists add 'quantum Cheshire Cats' to list of quantum paradoxes

Physicists add 'quantum Cheshire Cats' to list of quantum paradoxes | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Given all the weird things that can occur in quantum mechanics—from entanglement to superposition to teleportation—not much seems surprising in the quantum world. Nevertheless, a new finding that an object's physical properties can be disembodied from the object itself is not something we're used to seeing on an everyday basis. In a new paper, physicists have theoretically shown that this phenomenon, which they call a quantum Cheshire Cat, is an inherent feature of quantum mechanics and could prove useful for performing precise quantum measurements by removing unwanted properties.

The physicists, Yakir Aharonov at Tel Aviv University in Tel Aviv, Israel, and Chapman University in Orange, California, US, and his coauthors have published a paper on quantum Cheshire Cats in a recent issue of the New Journal of Physics.

The physicists begin their paper with an excerpt from Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel Alice in Wonderland:

'All right', said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end
of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had
gone.

'Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin', thought Alice, 'but a grin without a cat!
It's the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!'

Just as the grin is a property of a cat, polarization is a property of a photon. In their paper, the physicists explain how, "in the curious way of quantum mechanics, photon polarization may exist where there is no photon at all."

.

Via Wildcat2030
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is a very intriguing find. I am curious how this property striping impacts quantum encryption technology. 

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Researchers unveil 'shape-changing' technology that could change computer interaction forever

Researchers unveil 'shape-changing' technology that could change computer interaction forever | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have come up with a device that can render digital 3D content physically and which could change the way we interact with PCs.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This interface if miniaturized can be first workable solution for 3D virtual reality interface (though in my opinion limited to modeling, data visualizations and remote interaction. On the other hand I think the interface as it is has too many fine mechanical parts to be efficient.

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Welcome To The Unicorn Club: Learning From Billion-Dollar Startups | TechCrunch

Welcome To The Unicorn Club: Learning From Billion-Dollar Startups | TechCrunch | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Many entrepreneurs, and the venture investors who back them, seek to build billion-dollar companies. Why do investors seem to care about “billion dollar..
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Long time ago when I did not have a clue what it means I have been coined by one of my employers as a Unicorn. Now I am older and see what I did not see at the time. I am keen to push my self further as an entrepreneur and begin a start-up. This is a perfect read for all young people who are entering the industry and thinking about starting something.

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The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think

The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Douglas Hofstadter, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Gödel, Escher, Bach, thinks we've lost sight of what artificial intelligence really means. His stubborn quest to replicate the human mind.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Very interesting reading. I think we really need to give it a deeper thought what is it that intelligence implementation needs. A result will most likely will be the combination of unique interactive storage and cognitive processing.

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Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future'

Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future' | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
The pioneering American scientist, who created the world's first synthetic life, is building a gadget that could teletransport medicine and vaccines into our homes or to colonists in space

Via LilyGiraud
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is an impressive achievement towards the matter compiler. Imagine to have your drugs or food synthesized at home. In the time of space exploration this is unmissable piece of the puzzle.

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Windows 9

Windows 9 | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I cannot but commence desktop efforts of Microsoft, these previews of Windows 9 possible desktop show that they really try to implement innovative ideas. However it still makes me think about my older custom desktop themes in enlightenment 0.17.

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Surprisingly simple scheme for self-assembling robots

Surprisingly simple scheme for self-assembling robots | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
In 2011, when an MIT senior named John Romanishin proposed a new design for modular robots to his robotics professor, Daniela Rus, she said, 'That can't be done.'
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am certain that this is the future for domestic robotics. Basically all appliance will reconfigure it self into most useful shape for given task.

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Intel researcher debuts 3D-printed, open source robot Jimmy ...

Intel researcher debuts 3D-printed, open source robot Jimmy ... | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Meet Jimmy the 21st Century Robot. The artificial intelligence, or brains, of the robot is open source. So is the design and the technical description for printing him out as a 3D object. So feel free to clone the robot.

Via Scott Turner
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Probably I should have a go at it with my kids. I think instead of computers as a dreamed of toy in my childhood, my children will crave these sort of robots. Let's look towards the future.

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