Project Management
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Проектное управление – ответы на некоторые вопросы

Записали с коллегами из Стратоплан ответы на некоторые вопросы в проектном управлении в трех частях.
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15 Tested & Practical Tips from Women in Project Management •

15 Tested & Practical Tips from Women in Project Management • | Project Management | Scoop.it
On International Women’s Day I wanted to share some tips from the fabulous women in project management whom I have interviewed on this blog. Looking back through the discussions we had, there is so much wisdom and what struck me was the total willingness to share. Here are 15 practical tips from our community of amazing women, all tested and proven by the women themselves. Can you make these work in your projects and career? I hope so, as we #PressForProgress. #1: Book Virtual Meetings on a Schedule Sofia Hess says: Virtual meetings are essential for geographically dispersed teams. I think it is important to ensure that they take place on fixed days at fixed times, but also spontaneously when there is something out of the norm. It is important to concentrate on the essentials to ensure these meetings are not long-winded. That being said, I believe virtual meetings can’t replace the regular exchange one has with a colleague that’s sitting next to them. Virtual meetings simply cannot replace in-person meetings. Therefore we meet about once a month in person. This is incredibly important for our team. Read the whole interview with Sofia Hess here. #2: Delegate Emma Seaton-Smith says: When I started in project management I wish I had known more about what I shouldn’t be doing. It’s not about shirking your responsibilities, but about effective use of your time. If there’s a task that can be allocated to an administrator or tasks that can be managed by implementing a process for others to follow, then invest the time in setting that up. Read the whole interview with Emma Seaton-Smith here. #3: Understand The Strengths of Your Team Kate Morris says: By implementing Gallup Strengths in my team, I was able to assign projects, project resources and delivery outcomes complementing their individual strengths, resulting in better outcomes and a happier team. I loved encouraging different perspectives and collaboration. In turn, my team developed a deeper understanding of their strengths. And this learning in skills assessment was adopted by other teams, benefitting individual team members and the company. Understand what you bring to the table. My skills sets are not the same as my male counterparts and that’s a fantastic thing! I am where I am today because I offer a different perspective. Invest time in understanding your strengths and improving. Knowing what you do best and how you achieve satisfaction from your job is so powerful. Read the whole interview with Kate Morris here. #4: Stay Up To Date with Technology Rachel Gertz says: Technology is sweeping over every single industry and is fundamentally changing the way humans interact and solve problems together: automating feedback, shortening the learning and on-boarding cycles, not to mention revolutionising our tools to provide great transparency and collaboration between stakeholders. This is radically changing project management approaches and outcomes. Rigid bodies of knowledge will be forced to adapt to keep up with this pace as work culture and job roles shift. In other words, we need to think differently about the way we do project management. Project management requires a supreme amount of emotional intelligence and critical thinking. This role will be one of the last to be automated as artificial intelligence and machine learning creep up the employment ladder. Read the whole interview with Rachel Gertz here. #5: Make Time for Personal Development Pam Shergill says: Quite often, women have challenges of managing a house, children and a fulltime job. Take time out each week and invest in your personal development. Read blogs and inspirational stories about other people in project management and be inspired! Think I can… rather than … if only! Set out a plan for what you want to achieve, write it down with clear actions and timelines of what you want to achieve and when. Set yourself small milestone tasks to get there. Invest time and energy with a coach or mentor to keep you on track. If you want something bad enough, and you are committed then it’s possible to fulfil your dreams. Read the whole article with Pam Shergill here. #6: Know that All Your Experience Matters Karen Chovan says: Know what you’re passionate about, and place value on all of the skills you’ve developed from every position you’ve ever held. Including those waitressing jobs, sales positions or less exciting, laborious things you’ve done. You have picked up important skills at every stage, and you just need to recognise them, and share that with others. Don’t sell yourself short, don’t ever let someone tell you what you can’t do. If they do, carry on anyway, and don’t be afraid to ask for help along the way. You really can do whatever you set your mind to, so long as you put in the work. And never underestimate how the smallest connections you make might come back to you – in a positive or negative way – always put your best self forward. Read the whole interview with Karen Chovan here. #7: Be Self-Aware Natalie Warnert says: I wish I had known how much self-awareness the role takes. It’s hard to examine failure and examine yourself but it’s vital! By being able to have that vulnerability with yourself you can pass it along to your team and help them to improve too. There are so many resources at your fingertips from blogs to online and in-person trainings to books! You do not have to be an expert – far from it – you just have to be willing to learn and fail and help others do the same. Read the whole interview with Natalie Warnert here. #8: Check Progress Constantly Erica Pepitone says: Even when your projects seem to be going well, do audits and health checks – don’t get too comfortable! Ask as many questions as you need to and ensure everyone in the room is on the same page and hearing the same thing. A lot of a project’s success depends on how the team works together, so invest in those relationships with your team members. Read the whole interview with Erica Pepitone. #9: Live (And Work) Your Values Traci Duez says: I encourage my clients to think of their retirement party or their funeral… What 6 words do you want to hear as those closest to you describe the person you are/were? Do you want to hear them say… “That Elizabeth, she was amazing with Gantt Charts!” And, “Her risk management plans were to die for”? Most folks want to make a difference in the lives of others. They want to hear words like “loving, inspiring, compassionate, caring, hard-working, dependable, loyal, faithful, real, genuine and authentic.” As a leader and project manager, you must do two things: Work every day on gaining more of the attributes that you want to become; and If a project or task doesn’t help you to become more of the person you want to be, don’t do it!! I know that might sound harsh yet we are only on this earth for a very limited amount of time. I believe you are put on this planet to become the person you want to become. No one is going to be you. No one is going to help you become who you want to become. That is your “job” and your purpose. Read the whole interview with Traci Duez here. #10: Grow Your Leadership Skills Sarah Coleman says: I believe that the relevance and value of leadership competencies and behaviours across all levels and functions of the business, including projects, is becoming more apparent. Regardless of whether you have the title of “leader” or “manager”, “planner” or “administrator” we all understand that leadership capabilities are useful to your role. This is not to diminish the importance or role of planning, risk, value analysis and all other traditional “hard” skill sets; rather, it is a rebalancing of the skills required. Since my own background is in project and programme management, I find the shift towards leadership especially interesting and exciting. Read the whole interview with Sarah Coleman here. #11: Get The Right Team Monica Borrell says: I think what’s most important in delivering quality projects boils down to a few simple things that can be summarized as teamwork: a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, team members who are emotionally mature and self-aware, pervasive leadership, collaboration, and communication. If you get the team right, the rest is details. Read the whole interview with Monica Borrell here. #12: Do It Your Own Way Christine Unterhitzenberger says: At my very first project as a construction manager a very experienced and mature team leader from a contractor said to me: “I really enjoy and appreciate working with you. It often happens with female construction managers that they are particularly concerned about being accepted and therefore try to establish themselves by being rude, rough and ‘using their elbows’ which results in the contrary. But you just do your job like everybody else and you do it very, very well.” I‘ve really valued his feedback and tried to keep it in mind throughout my career. Therefore my tip for women wanting to do a similar role: don’t try too hard to get accepted by adopting a behaviour which is not yours. Follow your instincts and don’t do anything simply because it’s always been done this way – find your own way and bring your own touch to projects. This doesn’t necessarily have to be a big gesture; even small things can make a difference. For example I once took over a project from a colleague. There was a whole day of meetings every week and there was no break scheduled throughout the day, it was simply meeting after meeting. As I took over the project I introduced half an hour of lunch break. This made a big difference as first of all the people were refreshed after the break, but more importantly they used the lunch break to talk informally about certain issues of the project and resolved them during the break. Read the whole interview with Christine Unterhitzenberger here. #13: Build Your Network Ellen Maynes says: I learned that the best project managers were the ones who connected with people, were great leaders, team-builders and communicators. Don’t go it alone. Connect with others doing what you do (or want to do). Technology has also made it very easy to stay connected, no matter where you are. Read the interview with Ellen Maynes here. #14: Plan Your Stakeholder Engagement Caroline Crewe-Read says: Generalising is often unwise but I do think that women have a natural gift for relationship-building and for engaging openly and constructively with stakeholders and colleagues which stands us in very good stead when considering one of the key criteria for the successful delivery of projects and programmes. So my tip would be to take confidence from this, recognise that this may be the USP which marks you out from colleagues and build robust stakeholder engagement into any programme or project plan. Read the interview with Caroline Crewe-Read here. #15: Invest in Training Helen Hitchmough says: More than anything else, the [PRINCE2] training helped me because I was able to talk about projects and ideas with the other people there. Studying with other people brings project management more to life, by using case studies and talking to the other delegates. It’s all about pictures in your memory; being in the training room helps you remember later. Read the interview with Helen Hitchmough here. Let me into the Resource Library! Get access to over 20 project management templates, ebooks, checklists and more. The secret password is in your confirmation email! First Name Email Address We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. SUBSCRIBE We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit Pin for later reading: Photo by Uriel Soberanes on Unsplash
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5 Common Roadblocks on Projects (And What To Do About Them) •

5 Common Roadblocks on Projects (And What To Do About Them) • | Project Management | Scoop.it
These are 5 common project roadblocks along with tips on how to address them, so you can take action now to address any challenges before they become too big to handle.
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Why Johnny Can't Estimate?

Why Johnny Can't Estimate? | Project Management | Scoop.it
I work in a domain where engineered systems are developed for complex software-intensive system of systems. These systems are engineered with a variety of development methods. Ranging from traditional to agile and combinations in between.
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The Basics of Meetings

The Basics of Meetings
By Robert Kelly
It’s no secret that meetings are one of the downsides of a career in project management.
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So You Want to be a Global Project Manager?

So You Want to be a Global Project Manager? | Project Management | Scoop.it
You've experienced every aspect of the project manager life: managing projects, aligning team goals, setting new benchmarks of success. Every aspect except one: corporations are going global, and you want to be a part of that expansion.
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The Essential Hallmarks of a Project Leader

The Essential Hallmarks of a Project Leader
By Martin Webster
What makes a good project manager? What makes a great project leader?
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Embrace Risk - Agile Risk Management

Embrace Risk - Agile Risk Management | Project Management | Scoop.it
Risk is inherent to all our projects. Alan Moran helps us look at how to balance risk and reward.
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Третье занятие открытого курса – PMBOK® за 2,5 часа

Третье занятие открытого курса – PMBOK® за 2,5 часа | Project Management | Scoop.it
Это третье и последнее из “обязательных”, запланированных мной занятий открытого курса по управлению проектами.
Несколько лет назад я записал самый известный свой курс “Практический PMBOK® за 5 дней”.
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Умные вопросы на собеседованиях – книга (pdf)

Умные вопросы на собеседованиях – книга (pdf) | Project Management | Scoop.it
Мы решили выложить книгу-справочник для тех, кто проводит собеседования: Книга “Умные вопросы на собеседованиях” Эта книга – результат коллективного мозгового штурма 200+ участников семинара “Проведение собеседований и интервью”, на котором мы как...
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How to Handle Defects in Scrum

When possible, fix defects before the end of the Sprint. Treat later fixes as ordinary Backlog Items. Don’t seek blame. Use the Retrospective to seek improvement.
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Metrics for a Scrum Team

Metrics for a Scrum Team | Project Management | Scoop.it
Ten metrics to consider recording for your Scrum teams to analyze.
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Leadership Lessons

Leadership Lessons | Project Management | Scoop.it
There is an article in the current edition of The New Yorker about a solitary journey across Antarctica, by Henry Worsley. I wrote a paper in 2005 for our Program Management Office, Project Managers at a large environmental remediation site, where our group provided ICT services to 5,000 workers on site. This article was about Shackleton's ventures from the book Shackleton's Way. Here's the extract from that paper. In 1914 the explorer Earnest Shackleton boarded the Endurance with his team of seamen and scientists, intent on crossing the unexplored Antarctic continent. Endurance left England in August, while Shackleton stayed behind to raise more money. Shackleton joined the ship in Buenos Aires and then sailed to the whaling station Grytviken in South Georgia. On December 15, they sailed on with extra clothing and a great deal of apprehension, since they received reports of thick ice moving north. As the ice thickened, the going became more difficult. As the ship rammed through the ice floes, Shackleton became worried by the lack of progress. They wormed their way through a “gigantic and interminable jigsaw puzzle devised by nature.” On January 19, 1915, the ice of the Weddell Sea closed around Endurance and they were trapped. Working with picks, saws, and hand tools, the expedition made two attempts to break free. On February 24, they resigned themselves to stay on board and winter over. On October 27, 1915, the ice finally crushed Endurance. Shackleton proposed to head toward open water by marching across hundreds of miles of pack ice, pulling the lifeboats and supplies. After two days and a distance of fewer than two miles, the men found a large ice floe and made camp. They agreed to stay on the flow until the drift ice carried them closer to Paulet Island. They stayed on their ocean camp until the end of December. In April of 1916 the ice opened up and they were able to launch their boats. For 5½ days they rowed to Elephant Island, a rocky spit of land. After 497 days they reached solid ground. With food supplies running low they decided to split the crew in half and sail further on to South Georgia Island, 800 miles away. On May 10, after 16 days at sea, they landed on South Georgia Island. The bad news was they were on the wrong side of the island and had to traverse a glacier to reach the whaling station. After three days they reached the station. After three attempts to rescue the crew on Elephant Island, Shackleton reached the stranded crew at the end of August 1916, 128 days after launching the boats from the ice floe. 634 days after departure from South Georgia they had returned. All survived with a unique level of caring and camaraderie. “When disaster strikes and all hope is gone, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton” – Sir Edmund Hillary. Here's Advice to any Manager (project or business) from Shackleton.  Developing Leadership Skills Cultivate a sense of compassion and responsibility for others. You have a bigger impact on the lives of those under you than you can imagine. Once you make a career decision, commit to sticking through the tough learning period. Do your part to help create an upbeat environment at work. A positive and cheerful workplace is important to productivity. Broaden your cultural and social horizons beyond your usual experiences. Learning to see thing from different perspectives will give you greater flexibility in problem-solving at work. In a rapidly changing world, be willing to venture in new directions to seize new opportunities and learn new skills. Find a way to turn setbacks and failures to your advantage. This would be a good time to step forward on your own. Be bold in vision and careful in planning. Dare to try something new, but be meticulous enough in your proposal to give your ideas a good chance of succeeding. Learn from past mistakes - yours and those made by others. Sometimes the best teachers are the bad bosses and the negative experiences. Never insist on reaching a goal at any cost. It must be achieved at a reasonable expense, without undue hardship for your staff. Don't be drawn into public disputes with rivals. Rather, engage in respectful competition. You may need their cooperation someday. Selecting and Organizing the Crew Start with a solid core of workers you know from past jobs or who come recommended by trusted colleagues. Your Number 2 is your most important hire. Pick one who complements your management style, shows loyalty without being a yes-man (or woman) and has a talent for working with others. Hire those who share your vision. Someone who clashes with your personality or the corporate culture will hinder your work. Be a creative, unconventional interviewer if you seek creative, unconventional people. Go deeper than job experience and expertise. Ask questions that reveal a candidate's personality, value, and perspective on work and life. Surround yourself with cheerful, optimistic people. They will reward you with the loyalty and camaraderie vital for success. Applicants hungriest for the job are apt to work hardest to keep it. To weed out the potential slackers, choose workers who show a willingness to tackle any job, and will take a turn at the unpopular tasks. Hire those with the talents and expertise you lack. Don't feel threatened by them. They will help you stay on the cutting edge and bring distinction to your organization. Spell out clearly to new employees the exact duties and requirements of their jobs, and how they will be compensated. Many failed work relationships start with a lack of communication. To help your staff do top-notch work, give them the best equipment you can afford. Working with outdated, unreliable tools creates an unnecessary burden. Forging a United Team  Take time to observe before acting, especially if you are new to the scene. All changes should be aimed at improvements. Don't make changes just for the sake of leaving your mark. Always keep the door open to your staff members, and be generous with information that affects them. Well-informed employees are more eager and better prepared to participate. Establish order and routine on the job so all workers know where they stand and what is expected of them. Discipline makes the staff feel they're in capable hands. Break down traditional hierarchies and cliques by training workers to do a number of jobs, from the menial to the challenging. Where possible, have employees work together on certain tasks. It builds trust and respect and even friendship. Be fair and impartial in meting out compensation, workloads, and punishments. Imbalances make everyone feel uncomfortable, even the favored. Lead by example. Chip in to help with the work you're having others do. It gives you the opportunity to set a high standard and shows your respect for the job. Have regular gatherings to build esprit de corps. These could be informal lunches that allow workers to speak freely outside the office. Or they could be special holiday or anniversary celebrations that let employees relate to each other as people rather than only as colleagues. Developing Individual Talent Create a work environment comfortable enough to entice professionals to spend the greater part of their waking hours there. Allow for some personal preferences. Be generous with programs that promote the well-being of your staff. Healthy bodies and minds are more productive. Make sure each employee has challenging and important work. Even the lowest-ranking workers must feel they are making a valuable and appreciated contribution to the company. Match the person to the position. Be observant of the types of people who are working for you and what jobs might best suit their personalities as well as their experience. Give consistent feedback on performance. Most workers feel they don't get nearly enough words of praise and encouragement. Strive for work relationships that have a human as well as the professional element. No matter how large your company, get to know as many employees as possible. Memorize their interests as you can chat about something other than work. Reward the individual as well as the group. Public acknowledgment of a job well done - a birthday or a work anniversary - will make an employee feel appreciated. Be tolerant. Know each employee's strengths and weaknesses, and set reasonable expectations. Occasionally indulging individuals, even if you think they're being too needy, can have a powerful effect, especially in high-stress situations. Getting the Group Through a Crisis When crisis strikes, immediately address your staff. Take charge of the situation, offer a plan of action, ask for support, and show absolute confidence in a positive outcome. Get rid of unnecessary middle layers of authority, direct leadership is more effective in emergency situations. Plan several options in detail. Get a grasp of the possible consequences of each, always keeping your eye on the big picture. Streamline supplies and operations so they won't slow you down. Give your staff an occasional reality check to keep them on course. After a time, people will start to treat a crisis situation as business as usual and lose their focus. Keep your malcontents close to you. Resist your instinct to avoid them and instead try to win them over and gain their support. Defuse tension. In high-stress situations use humor to put people at ease, and keep your staff busy. Let go of the past. Don't waste time or energy regretting past mistakes or fretting over what you can't change. Ask for advice and information from a variety of sources, but ultimately make decisions based on your own best judgment. Let all people involved in the crisis participate in the solution, even if that means doling out some work that is less than vital. Be patient. Sometimes the best course of action is to do nothing but watch and wait. Give your staff plenty of time to get used to the idea of an unpopular decision by leaking early details. Forming Groups for the Toughest Tasks The best way to handle the biggest tasks is often to divide the staff into teams. Create units that are self-sufficient, but understand they won't all be equal. It is more important the teams are balanced when considering the big picture. Make sure you have some cracker-jack groups that can handle the toughest challenges. They can also help others, to ensure no team falls far behind. Give the tedious assignment to the workhorses who don't complain. Let them know you are aware that you are giving them an outsized task and that you count on their goodwill and exceptional fortitude to get the job done. Empower the team leaders so they have the authority to handle their own group, but keep an eye on the details. Never let yourself be surprised by problems down the road. Don't be afraid to change your mind when you see your plan isn't working. You won't look indecisive if you show the logic of your changes. Be self-sacrificing. Give whatever perks it is in your power to dispense. Give a show of confidence in those acting in your stead. It's important that your support staff maintain in your absence the same level of competency you set. Never point out the weaknesses of the individual in front of others. Often, it's better to let everyone share in a remedy aimed at a few. Chances are, even the strongest will benefit from it. Finding the Determination to Move Forward  Go-for-broke risks become more acceptable as options narrow. Sometimes the potential rewards at the end of a daring venture justify the risk of suffering a spectacular failure. Seek inspiration in enduring wisdom that has comforted or motivated you or others in times of crisis. It will get you through the most physically and emotionally draining times and help you to keep your perspective. Congratulate yourself and others for a job well done. A pat on the back or a sincere handshake is an expression of personal thanks and gratitude that has never gone out of fashion. Motivate your staff to be independent. If you have been a good leader, they will have the determination to succeed on their own. Let your staff inspire you. At times, an overwhelming workload may force you to consider lowering your standards. Remember that the final product must represent the best efforts of the entire group. Even in the most stressful situations, don't forget that you are part of a larger world that might benefit from your expertise. In turn, participating in community and family activities can give skills useful on the job. Make sure the whole job is done. Your staff may be able to call it quits after the heavy lifting is over, but you are responsible for seeing the work through to its successful completion.  Thoughts on Leadership from Shackleton  "There are lots of good things in the world, but I'm not sure that comradeship is not the best of them all - to know that you can do something big for another chap." "Optimism is true moral courage." "Leadership is a fine thing, but it has its penalties. And the greatest penalty is loneliness." "A man must shape himself to a new mark directly when the old one goes to ground." "The loyalty of your men is a sacred trust you carry. It is something, which must never be betrayed, something you must live up to." "I have often marveled at the thin line which separates success from failure." "You often have to hide from them not only the truth but your feelings about the truth. You may know that the facts are dead against you, but you mustn't say so." "If you're a leader, a follower that other fellows look to, you've got to keep going."
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Two Parallel Processes of Project Success - Both Value and Delivery are Needed

Two Parallel Processes of Project Success - Both Value and Delivery are Needed | Project Management | Scoop.it
There's a popular phrase in some parts of the agile community that goes like this... We focus on value production, not delivery This willfully ignores the principle of all business decision making in the presence of uncertainty...
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6 Easy Ways to Manage Group Think and Risk at Work •

6 Easy Ways to Manage Group Think and Risk at Work • | Project Management | Scoop.it
Dr. Mike Clayton gives some great advice on managing group think and risk at work in this guest article.
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Holy CRAP I have to do THIS ?!?!

Holy CRAP I have to do THIS ?!?! | Project Management | Scoop.it
Are YOU saying this TODAY about Scrum (or Agile)?
Or… do you know someone who is saying (OK… maybe THINKING) this?
This posting is for you (or send it to someone who you see freaking out about having to DO this).
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Глоссарий терминов проектного управления

На PMlead.ru теперь доступен словарь основных терминов проектного управления.
Это самая последняя версия лексикона менеджера. Английские термины – из открытой информации портала pmi.org – PMI®lexicon + русский перевод.
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5 Tips to Increase Your Leadership Confidence

5 Tips to Increase Your Leadership Confidence
By Lindel James
How would you rate your leadership confidence? 1) I wish I had some, 2) I am okay, but would like to be more confident 3) I am in control!
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Agile Program Management

Agile Program Management | Project Management | Scoop.it
Agile Program Management - Moving from Principles to Practices from Glen Alleman
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Несколько [моих] полезных видео на хабре

Записали с коллегами несколько видео для хабра:
- о патологических матрицах проекта: http://habrahabr.ru/company/stratoplan/blog/222709/ (35 минут)
 
Патологические матрицы в управлении проектами from stratoplan on Vimeo.
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Второе занятие бесплатного курса – опубликовано сегодня

В разделе “полезные материалы” добавилось еще одно занятие открытого, бесплатного курса по управлению проектами.
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Dimensional Planning

An analogy describing the use of Dimensional Planning to split Product Backlog items.
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Release Planning in Scrum

Scrum teams work in Sprints, producing continually improving product increments. The increments are intended to be released. Often it takes multiple Sprints to produce something worth releasing.
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