Child Labor and John Spargo
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Child Labor and John Spargo
"The unjust state of children during the early 1900s"
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2, 12-Sentence Paragraphs On Child Labor and John Spargo

     After reading and understanding the introduction of Tawnya Gambles’ Issue on Child Labor I can make out my own understanding of it.

     

     The laws of Child Labor during the Progressive Era didn’t become major until Americans realized how many young children were working to make money. Millions of children worked in factories, stores, fields, mills, and mines in the United States during the early 1900s. From starting out as young as 5 years old, ranging up to the age of 17. Photos from Lewis Hines will be shown a lot on my scoop it from my group. He was a photographer who was hired to report and photograph the various types of Child Labor tactics taking place in the United States. Primarily, children were seen as a source of cheap labor, which is why they were made to start working in the first place. Families would sometimes work in the mills side by side. Some children worked 6 days a week for 10 to 12 hours each day. Having to work caused many children not to be able to attend school. In 1903, a child labor bill finally became law; it prohibited any child less than 10 years to be employed in a factory, mill, or mine. In 1904, the age limit was 11, and in 1905 the age limit became 12. 

 

     The National Child Labor Committee was formed in 1904 to persuade Congress to control child labor. One of the members reported in 1907 that there were over 2 million children under the age of 16 in paid employment in the United States. According to the member 580,000 children between the ages of ten and fourteen years, could not read or write. Child labor is not as bad a problem as it was years ago, but it still affects millions of kids around the world. Today numbers from the International Labor Organization show that there are approximately 73 million children between ages 10 and 14 that still work in certain areas throughout the world. As well as 218 million children work worldwide between the ages of 5 and 17. Children in other countries are not able to be helped quickly enough as children are in the United States. Years before, when John Spargo found about the severity of Child Labor he stepped in and began taking action. He was a muckraker who exposed the problem about Child Labor in America. In 1906, “The Bitter Cry of the Children” was his outlet of thought. In the book, he describes the heartbreaking conditions of the coalmines for the small children that worked in them. It exposed a problem that the outside world didn’t see. 

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Child Labor and John Spargo

This is a video about Child Labor during Progressive Era and the affects of it. John Spargo was a man who spoke out against.
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John Spargo : Biography

John Spargo : Biography | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

John Spargo was born in Longdowns, Cornwall. He was a political figure and socialist. In February 1901, he moved to the United States with his wife Prudence. After moving to the United States he didn't return to England. In 1904, his wife died of tuberculosis. The next year he remarried to Amelia R. Bennetts. Together, they had 2 children, a daughter named Mary and a son who unfortunately died in his childhood. Throughtout the years he helped to establish a Socialist Society and he later wrote a book on Child Labor called The Bitter Cry Of Children . The purpose of the book was to expose the horrifying working conditions of child laborers. He believed in womens rights and civil rights for African Americans as well, but he wanted restrictions of immigrants. Later on in life, he lost interest in politics and spent his time devoting to the Bennington Museum. He died in 1966.

 

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Website #1 for the Issue On Child Labor Today as well as, Website #2 Progressive Era: Child Labor

Website #1 for the Issue On Child Labor Today as well as, Website #2 Progressive Era: Child Labor | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it
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Website #2 for the Issue On Child Labor Today

Website #2 for the Issue On Child Labor Today | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

Child labor is not as bad as it was a years ago, but it still affects millions of kids worldwide.

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(Primary Document #3) `Knitters in a Hosiery Mill. Location: Loudon, Tennessee.

(Primary Document #3) `Knitters in a Hosiery Mill. Location: Loudon, Tennessee. | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

Instead of holding a pencil in their hands they held needles, scissors, crochet hooks, and yarn. Did the parents ever think about how the children felt?

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Progressive Era: Child Labor

Progressive Era: Child Labor | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

In the image above it projects young boys working inside a spinning room at the "Cornell Mill". The boys are Child Labor workers and instead of going to school they go to work in order to provide for their families. Not only are the boys workers, but the girls work as well.

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Vocabulary

Muckraker: the action of searching out and publicizing scandalous information about famous people in an underhanded way; candidacy was threatened by her opponent's muckraking.

 

Doctrine: a belief or set of beliefs held and taught by a church, political party, or other group: the doctrine of predestination.

 

Radical: relating to or affecting the fundamental nature of something; far-reaching or thorough: a radical overhaul of the existing regulatory framework.

 

Conclave: a private meeting. • (in the Roman Catholic Church) the assembly of cardinals for the election of a pope. • the meeting place for such an assembly.

 

Disarmament: the reduction or withdrawal of military forces and weapons.

 

Syndicalism: a movement for transferring the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution to workers' unions. Influenced by Proudhon and by the French social philosopher Georges Sorel (1847–1922), syndicalism developed in French labor unions during the late 19th century and was at its most vigorous between 1900 and 1914, particularly in France, Italy, Spain, and the US.

 

Exegesis: critical explanation or interpretation of a text, esp. of scripture: the task of biblical exegesis | a close exegesis of the plot.

 

Theoretical: concerned with or involving the theory of a subject or area of study rather than its practical application: a theoretical physicist | the training is task-related rather than theoretical.

 

Utopian: modeled on or aiming for a state in which everything is perfect; idealistic.

 

Fanaticism: the quality of being fanatical: the dangers of religious fanaticism.

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Website #3 For Progressive Era: Child Labor

Website #3 For Progressive Era: Child Labor | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

This website discusses Child Labor laws as well as Child Labor Reforms. The photography is from Lewis Hines and Jacob Riis.

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(Primary Document #2) Child Labor and John Spargo

"These (child labor) state laws were not enforced. Often the children themselves and their parents, who wanted the money or could see no way to survive without it resisted. Federal legislations were passed, but were declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Only in 1938 did child labor laws become a reality."

- Smithsonian, on Child Labor in the early 20th Century United States

The Quote is based on the outlook on Child Labor.

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(Primary Document #1) Progressive Era: Child Labor issue in Georgia

(Primary Document #1) Progressive Era: Child Labor issue in Georgia | Child Labor and John Spargo | Scoop.it

I honestly believe that the children working in factories or mills were being forced to grow up to fast.

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