Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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The Amazing Power of a Plain Old Arts Education - EdWeek

The Amazing Power of a Plain Old Arts Education - EdWeek | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
So what should we be aiming for in K-12 arts programs? The skills and knowledge that prepare children (a select percentage of children, anyway) to be performers and artists, to attend highly selective college programs? Or is there value in simple exposure and experience, learning broadly across artistic disciplines? What should students take away?
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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Professional learning in a glance (or two)!
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Teen Ink | By Teens, For Teens

Teen Ink | By Teens, For Teens | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teen Ink, a national teen magazine, book series, and website devoted entirely to teenage writing, art, photos and forums. Students must be age 13-19 to participate, register and/or submit work. Distributed through classrooms by English teachers, Creative Writing teachers, Journalism teachers and art teachers around the country

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 30, 2018 9:31 AM

This could be a good source of materials if you are teaching teenagers. Mixture of fiction, poetry, images and fact.

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90 weird and wonderful facts about Winnie-the-Pooh | CBC Books

90 weird and wonderful facts about Winnie-the-Pooh | CBC Books | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh was born on Jan. 18, 1882.  To mark this milestone, Jan. 18 is Winnie-the-Pooh day.

To celebrate, here are 90 weird and wonderful facts about the Hundred Acre Wood.
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Stations are for High School Social Studies 

Stations are for High School Social Studies  | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The idea of centers (or stations) started largely in elementary schools.  As students get into middle school and high school, centers or stations start to disappear.  Less and less time is spent on different learning styles and more time is spent by the teacher talking. Lectures often become king in the secondary history classroom.  Lecture is easy yet also the least effective way of teaching. Centers take time to set up and implement, even in flipped classrooms. Still the engagement that comes out of well-designed centers make them a valuable part of secondary classes even if you only use once a week.  
Here's what I have learned about setting up and using centers in the secondary social studies classroom: 

Via Jim Lerman
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Bringing the Science of Learning Into Classrooms - Edutopia

Bringing the Science of Learning Into Classrooms - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Years of research prompt a group of scientists to ask whether we should rethink the way we do school.
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Here's What Kids Really Need to Know Before Kindergarten

Here's What Kids Really Need to Know Before Kindergarten | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I have a friend who took kindergarten prep very seriously. When her son began getting homework in preschool (“homework” and “preschool” being two words that should never go together) and he couldn’t properly identify on the homework that “car” started with the letter “C,” she freaked out.
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The Importance of Self-Care for Administrators - Edutopia

The Importance of Self-Care for Administrators - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
School leaders benefit from setting up and maintaining a system of support to help them meet the many challenges of the job.
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Five Ways to Inspire Creativity Across Disciplines: International Creativity Month | Learner Log

Five Ways to Inspire Creativity Across Disciplines: International Creativity Month | Learner Log | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"Many of the complex problems facing communities around the world will likely require innovation and creative solutions. Educators looking for ways to encourage creativity in their students may want to check out these suggestions offered on Learner Log, the blog of Annenberg Learner (whose abundant teaching resources have been featured in the Scout Report numerous times over the years). Here, readers will find a collection of five resources drawn from Annenberg Learner's archives, all chosen with classroom creativity in mind. One highlighted resource is a workshop for middle school teachers on integrating the arts with other subjects in their classrooms. Several resources provide further ideas and materials for interdisciplinary teaching, such as combining science with history, math with literature, and art with science. This collection also includes a ten-minute video exploring the link between creativity and REM sleep. In addition to these curated resources, Learner Log includes a link to one of their previous articles on arts integration across the curriculum, as well as a link to Education World's list of suggestions for celebrating International Creativity Month in the classroom.


Via Jim Lerman, Lars-Göran Hedström
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30 Amazing Sources for Free Teacher Resources - We Are Teachers

30 Amazing Sources for Free Teacher Resources - We Are Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teachers are always on the lookout for new inspiration and new ideas, but who’s got time to plow through the zillions of resources on the internet? Well, good news! We’ve done the research for you and here are 30 of our top sources for free teacher resources including lesson plans and activities created by fellow professional educators (marked with an asterisk). Happy huntin
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Oscar Carrera's curator insight, January 14, 5:18 AM

Teachers are always on the lookout for new inspiration and new ideas, but who’s got time to plow through the zillions of resources on the internet? Well, good news! We’ve done the research for you and here are 30 of our top sources for free teacher resources including lesson plans and activities created by fellow professional educators (marked with an asterisk). Happy huntin

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'Let's go exploring': The story of Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson | CBC Radio

'Let's go exploring': The story of Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson | CBC Radio | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Calvin and Hobbes had millions of followers when it was retired in 1995 after a 10-year run
John Evans's insight:

I feel in love with Calvin and Hobbes as an adult and lughed so hard it hurt at times at the humour. If you were an avid C & H reader, you'll love this story too!

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Interviewing for the Principalship: Nine Possible Questions - ASCD

Interviewing for the Principalship: Nine Possible Questions - ASCD | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As I work with aspiring administrators, I often am asked about potential interview questions that might be asked during the hiring process.   I offer a list of typical—and not so typical—interview questions that might be asked by panels who are considering school leader candidates.  Of course, a hiring decision often boils down to the right fit, so questions can vary wildly depending on the needs of a particular school or the district.  While this is not by any means a complete list, it does encompass a few examples of what kind of questions might be asked.   As they say, there is no “right answer,” so I have tried to include a bit of rationale of what the panel might be thinking as well as a possible approach one might take.  “Fit” is also an important consideration for the candidate; remember, you are interviewing them as well (though it may not feel like it!) and need to be sure that you are prepared for—and aware of—the specific leadership role that is involved.
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Tolkien Reads from The Hobbit in Rare Archival Audio from His First Encounter with a Tape Recorder – BrainPickings

Tolkien Reads from The Hobbit in Rare Archival Audio from His First Encounter with a Tape Recorder – BrainPickings | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In this rare archival recording from that serendipitous summer evening, sixty-year-old Tolkien reads from The Hobbit, doing a magnificent impression of Gollum in the ancient accent he so loved — please enjoy:
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Empathy-building ideas for your classroom - The Edvocate

Empathy-building ideas for your classroom - The Edvocate | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It’s not always easy to see someone else’s perspective. Anyone who tries to see from another viewpoint has to take into consideration another person’s past experiences and current emotions.

Understanding what another person is going through requires empathy, which is a learned characteristic.
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How Harry Potter Has Brought Magic To Classrooms For More Than 20 Years : NPR

How Harry Potter Has Brought Magic To Classrooms For More Than 20 Years : NPR | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Whether you're a Gryffindor, a Hufflepuff, a Ravenclaw, a Slytherin or a muggle still hoping your Hogwarts letter will arrive by owl, it is undeniable that the Harry Potter fandom has had a lasting impact throughout the world.

September marked the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone's U.S. release. NPR asked teachers then to tell us how the book has changed the way they teach. We learned that a lot has changed since 1998. Quidditch is no longer just game of fantasy. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is more than a textbook to pick up in Diagon Alley. And Hogwarts is no longer a place you can only dream of visiting.
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The Power of a Mid-Year Reboot - John Spencer @spencerideas

The Power of a Mid-Year Reboot - John Spencer @spencerideas | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
But the teacher calendar is a little different.

For most of us, January is a mid-year point. We’re halfway through the marathon of teaching. Even after a Winter Break, you’re likely tired. Really tired. For all the peppy, feel-good memes on social media about getting excited to jump back into teaching, it’s okay to feel a little haggard right now. This job can be physically, mentally, and emotionally draining — even when you love it.

And yet, this is also a chance to do a mid-year reboot. It’s a chance to take a creative risk. Some of the most innovative current classroom teachers I know use the mid-year point as an opportunity to spark creativity and bring in a revived energy at the halfway point.

So, what does this mid-year reboot actually look like?
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200 Students, Parents & Educators Spent Two Years Thinking About How to Support the Whole Child. Here Are 6 Things They Found | The 74

200 Students, Parents & Educators Spent Two Years Thinking About How to Support the Whole Child. Here Are 6 Things They Found | The 74 | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
For Duke University sophomore Mila de Souza, including social-emotional learning in schools should be common sense.

By that, she means it should be second nature for schools to support students’ mental health, teach children how to work well with others, and become a place where both educators and scholars can learn to value one another’s diverse experiences.

“I feel a lot of schools are focusing on just education and making sure these students are able to pass tests, but not really teaching students how to be good citizens in the world,” de Souza said.
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Unleashing Superpowers in the Classroom - Turning Students into Superhero Writers :: Analia Carcer

Unleashing Superpowers in the Classroom - Turning Students into Superhero Writers :: Analia Carcer | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Writing can be a daunting tasks for many students. It requires focus, practice, and diligence, all of which students are in the early stages of understanding and many may struggle to master. They are constantly learning new vocabulary, new information, and new ways to convey their ideas.

"The thought of filling a page with words can quickly generate a palpable level of panic and terror in a classroom. Creating lessons that play to students’ strengths, in creative and novel ways, keeps them engaged and makes the challenge of composing written work less overwhelming and more stimulating.

"I was tasked to create a project so students could convey their understanding of the elements of a story–setting, plot, characters, conflict, and theme–by writing a short story.

"I designed the project and individual lessons following the Torrance Incubation Model of Teaching (TIM) (1999)."


Via Jim Lerman, Lars-Göran Hedström
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Reading as Shared Experience - Jennifer Casa-Todd @JCasaTodd

Reading as Shared Experience - Jennifer Casa-Todd @JCasaTodd | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Because I believe in the power of a shared experience and dialogue around books, I made sure to use Book Clubs as a format in my English classes. I was truly able to assess whether my students had connected with the themes and characters in the book and they were talking about the novel in a much more authentic way. It is also because of this, that I have always been a teacher-advisor for a Book club in any school in which I have taught.

When I learned about the Global Read Aloud started by Pernille Ripp, many years ago, it was the shared experience of books that drew me in and the idea of expanding the perspectives beyond the homogeneous groups we sometimes (not always) encounter in our classrooms. The ability, in 2019, to connect with others to share opinions about a work of fiction is so easy and so powerful.
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Creating a Therapy Dog Program -School Library Journal

Creating a Therapy Dog Program -School Library Journal | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As a school library media specialist, I’ve always wanted to combine my two personal interests in the library: books and dogs. Public libraries programs with children reading to dogs inspired me to start a program in my school library.

In my previous role as a middle school librarian in New Hampshire, I proposed an initiative for students to read to dogs in the library, but was told no dogs were allowed on school property for any reason. This was not the community to embrace therapy dogs in the library.

Three years ago, I took a position at a library that serves middle and high school students in a Boston suburb. My first year, when students were taking Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, I noticed de-stressing stations in the school lobby. Chocolate tasting and aromatherapy stations were set up in the lobby near a fenced off area where students could visit with dogs and handlers.

I also noticed one of my principals brought his own dog to school every day during the summer. I researched my idea of using therapy dogs in the library for this more receptive environment. When I approached the principals with my proposed reading therapy dog program, they agreed to let me pilot the idea. Organizing and coordinating this popular dog therapy program has added to my daily workload, however, it is so much fun that it does not feel like work.
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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 14, 6:39 PM

I didn't know where to categorize this -- Ed Tech or Heart Matters? This combines both!  Where would you put it? LOVE THIS IDEA! (yeah, shouting that!) -- Thanks Creating a Therapy Dog Program by @ms_librarylady -School Library Journal @sljournal!

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7 Educational Podcasts to Listen to in 2019 - Teacher Cast

7 Educational Podcasts to Listen to in 2019 - Teacher Cast | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Have you tried listening to podcasts for your professional development?

Podcasts are first and foremost FREE.  They are ON DEMAND content and can answer dozens, if not hundreds of dozens of questions that you may have about educational technology, professional pedagogy and more.  Did you know there are more than 700,000 podcasts on iTunes … RIGHT NOW?
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Writing Prompts images on Pinterest | Cut animals, Faces and Fluffy animals

Writing Prompts images on Pinterest | Cut animals, Faces and Fluffy animals | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Over 100 stimulating photos to jump start creative approaches to language arts, especially writing.


Via Jim Lerman
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StoryWeaver - Stories in multiple languages

StoryWeaver - Stories in multiple languages | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Reading is one of the most essential components of a child's learning & development journey. At Pratham Books and StoryWeaver, we understand this and StoryWeaver came about with the exact purpose of increasing access to books for children in languages and context that they enjoy - in a boundary-less digital way.

Via Nik Peachey
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Vane García Aguilar's curator insight, November 28, 2018 5:05 PM

This is a wonderful resource of great simple stories for kids in multiple languages. There is also an image bank and you can create your own stories on the site. Marvelous.

Elise Ayoub's curator insight, December 1, 2018 8:39 AM
This tool allows you to create your own story with illustrations which you can pick from an image bank.You can also read and comment on the stories of others.Great constructive and collaborative as well as creativity enhancing tool that will restore children's love for reading. 
Aya Arab's curator insight, December 11, 2018 1:18 AM
more than 10000 stories in more than 120 languages in different English levels all in one place.
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249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking - TeachThought

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Bloom’s Taxonomy’s verbs–also know as power verbs or thinking verbs–are extraordinarily powerful instructional planning tools.

In fact, next to the concept of backward-design and power standards, they are likely the most useful tool a teacher-as-learning-designer has access to. Why?
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Everything Teachers Should Know About Mental Health Days (FAQ) - We Are Teachers

Everything Teachers Should Know About Mental Health Days (FAQ) - We Are Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Are you curious about the idea of teacher mental health days? Have you thought about taking one yourself? Here are some questions you might ask yourself about teacher mental health to help you figure out if taking one is right for you. 
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Five Ways to Nurture Compassion in Kids | MindShift | KQED News

Five Ways to Nurture Compassion in Kids | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There are many stories about people who have made a difference that come from individuals or groups that have experienced hardship as they strive to overcome those hardships. For your child, this might be what inspires them to action, but it doesn’t have to be. Everyone has the potential to make a difference in their own way. Some children and adults feel comfortable raising their voices in a loud way, while others prefer a quieter approach. Making a difference might mean speaking up or taking action when you see an injustice, doing something to take care of the environment, letting someone know that you care about them, or playing an active role in your community in other ways. By exposing your child to many different role models in real life and in stories, you can show your child examples of the many ways people can make a difference. Learning about others through stories can help children learn about what is possible and give them opportunities to practice thinking about other people’s feelings and learn words and actions they can use as they reach beyond themselves.

Teaching your child compassion is also an opportunity for you to grow as well, as you strive to be the role model you would like your child to have. AS you continue to have conversations with your child aimed at building compassion, consider the following strategies:
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Tomorrow's Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future - TeachThought

Tomorrow's Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Let’s take a look at this vague idea of the ‘classroom of the future.’ This is all subjective, but it’s worth talking about. So let’s talk.

Below are some ideas that are truly transformational–not that they haven’t been said before. It’s not this article that’s transformational, but the ideas themselves. These ideas aren’t just buzzwords or trendy edu-jargon but the kind of substance with the potential for lasting change.

And the best part? This is stuff that’s available not tomorrow with ten grand in classroom funding and 12 hours of summer PD, but today. Utopian visions of learning are tempting, if for no other reason than they absolve us of accountability to create it right now, leading to nebulous romanticizing about how powerful learning could be if we just did more of X and Y.

But therein lies the rub: Tomorrow’s learning is already available, and below are seven of the most compelling and powerful trends, concepts, and resources that represent its promise.
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