Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Are You a #Curator or a Dumper? Cult of Pedagogy Jennifer Gonzalez  @cultofpedagogy

Are You a #Curator or a Dumper? Cult of Pedagogy Jennifer Gonzalez  @cultofpedagogy | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I have written about curation before, but last time, I was talking about curation as a class assignment, something students do. Now I want to focus on you, the educator. Whether you’re a teacher, an administrator, a librarian, a researcher—whatever you do, chances are you have information to share with other people, and developing your curation skills—both in terms of how much you offer and how you deliver it—is going make that sharing a lot more effective.

So let’s take a look at how the brain responds to dumping, some school-related situations when good curation skills would come in handy, a set of curation guidelines to follow, and a short list of tech tools that can help you curate digitally.
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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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This is 18 Around the World — Through Girls’ Eyes - The New York Times

This is 18 Around the World — Through Girls’ Eyes - The New York Times | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What does life look like for girls turning 18 in 2018? We gave young women photographers around the world an assignment: Show us 18 in your community. This is 18 — through girls’ eyes.OCT. 11, 2018
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A Pumpkin’s Life - The Kids Should See This

A Pumpkin’s Life - The Kids Should See This | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"A Pumpkin’s Life is a Sesame Street-style pumpkin time-lapse filmed in 2011 by Jon Fletcher at Sykes-Cooper Farms in Elkton, Florida. To capture each stage, he built a solar-powered camera to capture the pumpkins from seed to October-ready fruit. What does it take to grow a pumpkin?"

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Helping Learners to be Kind Online and Offline – Teacher Reboot Camp

Helping Learners to be Kind Online and Offline – Teacher Reboot Camp | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
October is National Bullying Prevention month. I like to focus on getting students to spread kindness and feel the benefits of being kind versus being mean to others. Many children play social games, such as Roblox and Fortnite, and experience cyberbullying much more than we did in the past. Many students have shared with me their experiences of others being mean, trash talking, or cursing at them during the games. Many of the children don’t realize the impact of their reactions or words on others. To help students reflect more on how their words and actions impact others our objective this month is, “How to be kind online and offline!” Below are some resources and ideas related to this theme so you can challenge your students to choose to be kind online and offline.
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5 Must Watch TED Talks for Teachers

5 Must Watch TED Talks for Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Here are five of the ‘classic’ TED talks we think every teacher should watch and share with students, or better yet, watch together in class and engage students in constructive discussion around their themes. The speakers are leading thinkers in their fields and the themes covered include motivation (Dan Pink), leadership (Simon Sinek), grit ( Angela Duckworth), education death valley (Sir Ken Robinson), and belief in students potential (Rita Pierson). "

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Chip Conley: What baby boomers can learn from millennials at work -- and vice versa

Chip Conley: What baby boomers can learn from millennials at work -- and vice versa | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
For the first time ever, we have five generations in the workplace at the same time, says entrepreneur Chip Conley. What would happen if we got intentional about how we all work together? In this accessible talk, Conley shows how age diversity makes companies stronger and calls for different generations to mentor each other at work, with wisdom flowing from old to young and young to old alike.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy

25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy

Via Cindy Rudy
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Secondary Traumatic Stress for Educators: Understanding and Mitigating the Effects | MindShift | KQED News

Secondary Traumatic Stress for Educators: Understanding and Mitigating the Effects | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Roughly half of American school children have experienced at least some form of trauma — from neglect, to abuse, to violence. In response, educators often find themselves having to take on the role of counselors, supporting the emotional healing of their students, not just their academic growth.

With this evolving role comes an increasing need to understand and address the ways in which student trauma affects our education professionals.

In a growing number of professions, including firefighters, law enforcement, trauma doctors and nurses, child welfare workers, and therapists and case managers, it is now understood that working with people in trauma — hearing their stories of hardship and supporting their recovery — has far-reaching emotional effect on the provider.

The condition has numerous names: secondary traumatic stress (STS), vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue.
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6 Ways to Build Lifelong Learning Skills With Your Learners - Global Digital Citizen

6 Ways to Build Lifelong Learning Skills With Your Learners - Global Digital Citizen | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Many great educators have said many great things about the importance of lifelong learning skills. John Dewey, however, probably said it best: “Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” 

Educators want their learners to succeed both in and out of the classroom. The idea is to make sure that once they leave school they no longer need us. In essence, our learners must become the teachers and the leaders. The point is that they never stop being learners.

This is what it means to be a lifelong learner. Below are a few ways that you can help them achieve this priceless mindset.
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Oscar Carrera's curator insight, October 9, 1:15 PM

Excellent resource to share with middle and high school level students. Teaching them to be life long learners.

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Are Canadian kids losing the ability to play? New study suggests a problem - National | Globalnews.ca

Are Canadian kids losing the ability to play? New study suggests a problem - National | Globalnews.ca | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Canadian kids aren’t just inactive but lack the fundamental movement skills, knowledge and motivation to engage in physical activities and play, according to a new study.

The study, led by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, examined more than 10,000 children aged 8-12 across Canada over three years and found that only one-third of kids meet what is thought to be a basic level of physical literacy.

That means that most kids lack skills like throwing a ball and perform below expectations in aerobic tests, don’t get enough physical activity and what’s more — they don’t want to."

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What Is A Personal Learning Network?

What Is A Personal Learning Network? | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What is a personal learning network, or rather a Personal Learning Network? How about a Professional Learning Network?

In the video below, Marc-André Lalande offers a concise, useful definition that simplifies the idea from hashtags and movements and social engagement and badges and, well, all the buzzwords you hear, into a clear explanation that works not just within education, but any field.
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5 Steps to Creating Authentic Learning Experiences – Mr Kemp NZ

5 Steps to Creating Authentic Learning Experiences – Mr Kemp NZ | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Schools globally are starting to make large-scale decisions to implement strategic decisions that add maximum impact to student learning, often they miss the mark, investing in tools of pedagogy. Here are our 5 steps to take when creating authentic learning experiences for students and teachers in your school:"

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Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences (2018) | Common Sense Media

Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences (2018) | Common Sense Media | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Social media platforms are central to every aspect of teens' lives, from how they stay in touch with friends to how they engage with politics. And constantly refreshing their social feeds can feel simultaneously positive and negative: Teens say social media strengthens their relationships but also distracts them from in-person connection.

Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences sheds light on teens' changing social media habits and why some kids are more deeply affected by -- and connected to -- their digital worlds. The report is a nationally representative survey of more than 1,000 kids age 13 to 17. And because it tracks changes from 2012 to today, we can see how teens' social media use continues to evolve. Read the full report.

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GwynethJones's curator insight, October 6, 8:54 PM

Common Sense Media is just really the best!

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Educating the Whole Child? Consider How Their Brains Work | EdSurge News

Children often live in two different worlds. That was the premise of a video Akimi Gibson, the vice president and education publisher of Sesame Workshop (the nonprofit behind Sesame Street), showed the audience at the EdSurge Fusion conference in Burlingame, Calif.

In the video, singer Ed Sheeran, flanked by Sesame Street characters, sings about the contrast between life at home and life at school for a kid. At home, a child can move around more and talk when she wants. School is a more controlled environment where she has an assigned seat and has to raise her hand.

“For our young ones, going from ‘me’ to ‘we’ can be quite traumatic,” Gibson said. Educators have to think about how children's’ brains work, she argued, and schools need to focus on educating the “whole child,” a term that takes non-academic factors into account, such as health and emotional supports both in school and at home.
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Can you beat my score on this climate change quiz? | Bill Gates

Can you beat my score on this climate change quiz? | Bill Gates | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What causes climate change?

Aside from some notable skeptics, everyone knows that it’s caused by greenhouse gases produced by human activity. It’s common knowledge today that emissions get trapped in our atmosphere and increase the planet’s temperature. But where do these gases come from?
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9 Mental Math Tricks and Games for Students - Thoughtco

9 Mental Math Tricks and Games for Students - Thoughtco | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Mental math deepens students' understanding of fundamental math concepts. In addition, knowing that they can do mental math anywhere, without relying on pencils, paper, or manipulatives, gives students a sense of success and independence. Once students learn mental math tricks and techniques, they can often figure out the answer to a math problem in the amount of time it would take them to pull out a calculator.
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How Do You Make Education Research ‘Accessible and Usable’ for Teachers? | EdSurge News

How Do You Make Education Research ‘Accessible and Usable’ for Teachers? | EdSurge News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Nearly every week, if not every day, a new report comes out detailing the latest findings and results around what works—or doesn’t—when it comes to the latest instructional approaches and tech tools. But what’s clearly not working is getting educators to pay attention to this research to inform their own work in the classroom.

In the spirit of putting the educators at the center of education research, the nonprofit Jefferson Education Exchange (JEX) and the Institute of Education Science (IES)—the independent research arm of the U.S. Department of Education—have joined forces to embark on a listening tour to understand if and how their current research strategy is missing the mark.

Over the next few weeks, officials from JEX, which is based out of the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education, and IES are visiting Omaha, Neb. and Raleigh, N.C. to “enter into serious discussions” with teachers, principals and superintendents, says Mark Schneider, the director of the IES.

As is, it seems educators give minimal weight to what research says, much less how it’s delivered, and the IES wants to change that.

“We’ve been producing really good research ... but ultimately, if we care about student success, we need teachers involved in the process,” Schneider tells EdSurge. “We need to understand what kind of work and research is most useful for them. We need to understand how to get it in their hands, and then how to make it work better.”
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 16, 7:53 AM
How to make it “accessible and usable?”
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Are we educating for life or school? – Katie Martin

Are we educating for life or school? – Katie Martin | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Whether it’s my uber driver, a parent, teacher, student etc. it seems that more often than not in various conversations I have people tell me that they (or their children) don’t “learn that way” in reference to how we traditionally do school. People explain that they are visual or like to work with their hands or need to talk to others and try some things out, which they often explain, is not how they were supposed to “learn” in school. Instead, success was determined by sitting still, individually completing endless packets or worksheets, and providing the right answers on the tests.

I am amazed (and honestly frustrated) that we have become so conditioned to believe that the way we do school in many cases is what’s right instead of the way many people actually learn. We have this widely accepted notion that there is something wrong with us (or others) because we don’t fit in the box of what is traditionally accepted as smart, instead of acknowledging that learner variance is the norm, not the exception. As I work with diverse educators and talk with students, there are common characteristics that always surface when people share powerful learning experiences. 
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Why Graphic Novels Belong in All of Our Libraries – Pernille Ripp

Why Graphic Novels Belong in All of Our Libraries – Pernille Ripp | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
So when I hear teacher’s tell students that graphic novels are too easy.  That comic books are not real reading.  That it is time to pick a “real” book.  That they can read books like that for fun but not for learning, I tend to get a bit upset.  You see, comics are what kept me reading long into the night as a child when books seemed like too much work.  Graphic novels are what make my students who declare they hate reading actually give it a try.  Dog Man and all of the other books by Dav Pilkey are what made Thea believe she was a reader.  How can we just dismiss that?
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20 Strategies For Getting The Best Work From Your Students - TeachThought

20 Strategies For Getting The Best Work From Your Students - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Typical strategies for getting the best work from students focus on extrinsic motivation and gamification—points, grades, badges, certificates, stars, trophies, glowing feedback, encouragement, pep talks, ‘pressure,’ and other ways to ‘motivate students.’ That these strategies are underwhelming in effect—and tend to not yield the life-long learners education seeks to create—shouldn’t be surprising.


Below, I’ve offered 12 strategies for getting the best work from your students. Some are obvious (provide student choice) and many you may already do. The idea here is to clarify the kinds of teaching practices and learning strategies that give your students the best chance to do their best–to consistently do their very best work, and grow the most as students over the course of a school year.
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The Most Dangerous Phrase In Education - TeachThought

The Most Dangerous Phrase In Education - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I was speaking (tweeting) with Mark Barnes tonight, and he mentioned the idea of challenging existing forms and practices. And then someone tweeted the above image–a quote attributed to Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, according to the image source globalnerdy.com–and I was happy and favorited and saved and blogged.


The most dangerous phrase in the language is “we’ve always done it this way.” Which applies to education, too.
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25 Ways to Develop a Growth Mindset

25 Ways to Develop a Growth Mindset | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What if your true learning potential was unknown, even unknowable, at best? What if it were impossible to foresee what you could accomplish with a few years of passion, toil, and training? According to Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, this isn’t some hypothetical situation, dependent on any manner of factors from genes to environment. It’s a mindset. And it’s one you can cultivate at any point in life.

A “growth mindset,” as Dweck calls it, is pretty much exactly what it sounds like: a tendency to believe that you can grow. In her book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, she explains that while a “fixed mindset” assumes that our character, intelligence, and creative ability are static givens which we can’t change in any meaningful way, a growth mindset thrives on challenge and sees failure “not as evidence of unintelligence but as a heartening springboard for growth and for stretching our existing abilities.”

She writes:

“Believing that your qualities are carved in stone creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character, well then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics.”
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Lessons From Sherlock Holmes: It’s Elementary! – Sue Waters @suewaters

Lessons From Sherlock Holmes: It’s Elementary! – Sue Waters @suewaters | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who wrote the Sherlock Holmes stories was lucky enough to rediscover his love of literature in his later years. Is this true for all students?

What role do teachers play in instilling a passion for learning and a love of reading? What impact do reading logs, chapter studies, exams, worksheets, teacher-generated questions and so on have on a students’ love of reading?

As an avid reader, I’d love to share an author I’ve recently come to appreciate with some lessons that may be useful to everyone in the education community.
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TED-Ed Launches A New Channel For Talks From Teachers

TED-Ed Launches A New Channel For Talks From Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Most of us are familiar with TED Talks and TED-Ed animated videos and lessons – I certainly share enough of them and you can read more at The Best Teacher Resources For “TED Talks” (& Similar Presentations).

Today, as part of World Teacher Day, Google and TED-Ed announced a new TED-Ed Educator Talks YouTube Channel, that “will be dedicated to celebrating and amplifying the ideas of teachers around the world.”"

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What Is Bloom's Taxonomy? A Definition For Teachers -

What Is Bloom's Taxonomy? A Definition For Teachers - | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In one sentence, Bloom’s Taxonomy is a hierarchical ordering of cognitive skills that can, among countless other uses, help teachers teach and students learn.

For example, Bloom’s Taxonomy can, for example, be used to create assessments, evaluate the complexity of assignments, design assessments, design curriculum, develop online courses. or plan project-based learning experiences for students.
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Elementary Book Club for Advanced Readers |

Elementary Book Club for Advanced Readers | | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When I work with elementary teachers, one of the biggest challenges they face is the wide range of reading skills in their classrooms. A first-grade class may have students who are struggling to decode while other students are reading at a third-grade level. This presents significant challenges as teachers attempt to support students below grade-level while challenging those readers who are above grade level.

Most of the teachers I coach at the elementary level are using the Station Rotation Model during their English language block. Students rotate through a series of online and offline stations designed to develop their reading skills. In an effort to challenge students who are above reading level, I worked with a first-grade teacher, Jessica Perry, to design a book club for advanced readers using Google Slides and FlipGrid.
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