Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought

52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
We’ve dug through dozens of books, teacher magazines, pinterest boards, and other blogs to find 52 of our favorite inspirational quotes for teachers. We’ve tried to come up with a range of ways of thinking about teaching and learning without resorting to the most cliche lines you’ve heard again and again.

Some of these you’ve likely heard before, but hopefully the bulk of them are both new, and capable of that extra push when you need it.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 29, 2016 9:34 AM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 2016 9:28 PM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Ron Wolford's curator insight, July 18, 2016 11:19 AM
Teach Thought
Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Making Rest a Priority in the Summer - John Spencer @spencerideas

Making Rest a Priority in the Summer - John Spencer @spencerideas | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teaching is an exhausting gig and when teachers take the time to rest during the summer, they able to find a place of renewal and restoration. Research has demonstrated that rest is vital for maintaining our passion and reaching our creative potential. However, it’s easy to go through the summer without finding any true restoration. In this article and podcast, we explore what it looks like to make rest a priority in the summer.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 15, 9:44 AM
Great advice here! “Own your summer.”
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The Top 8 Professional Reads for Educators 2018 

The Top 8 Professional Reads for Educators 2018  | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Summer is here (for those in the Northern Hemisphere). If you are like most educators, this is your time to rest, relax and for many, delve into some professional reading and learn about all those exciting strategies and resources that will reinvigorate learning in your classroom and school when you return after the break.

After the suggestions were tallied these are the Top 8 reads for educators (plus some bonuses) that you simply can not miss. Only 2 of last years list remain with 6 newcomers to the 2018 BEST Edu-Read list…
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Ontario student develops online course to teach life skills not taught in school | Lifestyle from CTV News

Ontario student develops online course to teach life skills not taught in school | Lifestyle from CTV News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
From filing taxes to acing a job interview, an Ontario high school student has set out to teach his peers important life skills they don’t learn in a classroom.

Austin Chan developed an online curriculum called “What You Didn’t Learn in School” (WYDLIS). It covers a broad range of topics to help students become successful adults after polling his fellow classmates about what they felt they were missing in their education in an online survey.

The Grade 10 student at Markville High School included the results of his poll into five different subjects: professional development, self-growth, lifestyle, money, and social skills.
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10 Pieces of Teaching Wisdom To Reflect On This Summer

10 Pieces of Teaching Wisdom To Reflect On This Summer | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Summer break is nearly here — and we know that for most educators, that doesn’t mean a decrease in workload, but simply a restructuring of the day’s work. The pace and environment of summer does…
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For Young Brains, a Storytelling Sweet Spot - Edutopia

For Young Brains, a Storytelling Sweet Spot - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
A new study uses brain scans to determine that for preschoolers, one type of story is just right.
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10 Things Great School Leaders Do Over the Summer - Edutopia

10 Things Great School Leaders Do Over the Summer - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Great school leaders aren’t measured by how much they accomplish from August to June, but rather, how their students grow and thrive year after year. In the summer months, it is vital for leaders to reflect, innovate and strategize on making the next school year successful.

In my work at CT3, I see effective educators who make great use of the summer months. Here are some ideas:
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Teachers Have Great Ideas. Here’s How to Turn Them into Reality. | EdSurge News

Teachers Have Great Ideas. Here’s How to Turn Them into Reality. | EdSurge News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In looking at leaders spearheading innovation, Harvard Business Professor Linda A. Hill has noted that while “all were visionaries capable of creating a vision and inspiring others to pursue it, none considered this their primary role. Instead, they saw themselves as ‘social architects’, whose role was to shape the context. They created communities in which others were willing and able to innovate.”

So how are school systems providing this space for teachers? In all sorts of ways. Here’s how two of them are spurring teacher innovation through new policies and programs, which may serve as a roadmap for others.
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60-Second Strategy: Stand-Up Meetings - Edutopia

60-Second Strategy: Stand-Up Meetings - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Having staff stand for meetings keeps them quick—15 minutes, max—and efficient.
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GwynethJones's curator insight, June 8, 5:50 PM

I like this idea!

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Innovate My School - 14 tips for successful failure

Innovate My School - 14 tips for successful failure | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Fear, worry and stress. These are all normal processes we must work through at certain times and events in our lives, and we need to learn how to manage these. “Children should experience a healthy amount of stress.”So how do we learn? By watching role models, parents, teachers, other family members. Will children ever learn how to manage if we wrap them up and protect them, then expect them to be able to cope when they are older? We wouldn’t give a child a book and expect them to read it without teaching them the skills first.

We often hear the phrases “celebrating diversity” and “creating a diverse workforce”, and we need to adopt this strategy when it comes to children. It could be suggested that adults contribute to children’s worries and anxieties, so what can we do to change this, and who needs to take responsibility?
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Reigniting a Passion for Reading - Edutopia

Reigniting a Passion for Reading - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Research shows that reading for pleasure leads to success in school, the workplace, and life. It helps students empathize with their peers and reduces their stress levels.

Unfortunately, as children age, they read less. Parents and teachers report that kids read much less in middle and high school than they did in elementary school. Common Sense Media’s “Children, Teens, and Reading” 2014 research brief reflects this distressing trend:

53 percent of 9-year-olds were daily readers, but only 17 percent of 17-year-olds were.
The proportion of children who “never” or “hardly ever” read tripled from 1984 to 2014. A third of 13-year-olds and 45 percent of 17-year-olds said they read for pleasure one to two times a year, if that.
Many parents recognize that reading is important and want to help reverse this decline. Middle school parents, in particular, are an untapped resource of classroom support. Many of them were active volunteers in their children’s elementary school and would welcome the opportunity to assist again in the classroom.
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Guiding Students to Drive Their Curriculum

Guiding Students to Drive Their Curriculum | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The last few days before winter break are often a wash. Students—and teachers—are exhausted and distracted. This year, however, the fifth and sixth graders at Science Leadership Academy Middle School (SLA-MS) in Philadelphia were more engaged than ever.

On the last school day of December, we had students collaborating, debating ideas, writing furiously, and standing on chairs to proudly present their thinking. One student exhorted his peers, “Listen up, because this matters for all of us.”

These students were voting to define their own curriculum for the remainder of the school year. There’s no question that we need to value student voice in classrooms. But how do we shift from creating space for student voice to centering student ideas and creating curricula with students? At SLA-MS, this question has guided the development of Humanities content organized around our yearlong theme, bravery.
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How Schools Can Help Notice and Serve the 'Quiet Kids' | MindShift | KQED News

How Schools Can Help Notice and Serve the 'Quiet Kids' | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When Lily Shum was little, she dreaded speaking up in class. It wasn't because she didn't have anything interesting to say, or because she wasn't paying attention or didn't know the answer. She was just quiet.

"Every single report card that I ever had says, 'Lily needs to talk more. She is too quiet,' " recalls Shum, now an assistant director at Trevor Day School in Manhattan.

She doesn't want her students to feel the pressure to speak up that she felt.

That's why she's joined more than 60 educators in New York City recently at the Quiet Summer Institute. The professional development workshop was based on Susan Cain's bestseller Quiet: The Power of Introverts In A World That Can't Stop Talking.
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6 Techniques for Building Reading Skills—in Any Subject

6 Techniques for Building Reading Skills—in Any Subject | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As avid lovers of literature, teachers often find themselves wanting to impart every bit of knowledge about a well-loved text to their students. And this is not just an ELA issue—other disciplines also often focus on the content of a text. However, teaching reading skills in English classes and across the disciplines is an almost guaranteed way to help students retain content. Unfortunately, the tendency to focus on the content is a real enemy to the ultimate goal of building reading skills.

Without a repertoire of reading strategies that can be applied to any text, students are being shortchanged in their education. In order to teach students to read effectively, teachers must be sure that they are not simply suppliers of information on a particular text but also instructors of techniques to build reading skills. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate reading skills lessons into a curriculum.
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GwynethJones's curator insight, May 28, 7:56 PM

These are really great!

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Using Picture Books With Older Students – A How-to Guide – Pernille Ripp

Using Picture Books With Older Students – A How-to Guide – Pernille Ripp | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I have written extensively about the use of picture books within our classroom and yet there are still questions that keep coming up.  No worries as I realized that I had yet to make a central blog post about picture books and how I use them with older students and so while this post may be long, I hope it is helpful.  Note that really everything I write here about using picture books with older students also goes for using them with younger kids because as we all know there no is no too old for picture books.

I have written before of why I use picture books with my middle school students, the changes it has created for us as we build our community of readers.  I have shared lists upon lists of our favorite books as well, hoping to help others find the very best value in the books they bring in, hoping to inspire others to make them an integral part of their classroom.
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Agency and the Rise of New Power - Modern Learners

Agency and the Rise of New Power - Modern Learners | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Surprisingly, it wasn’t Deputy Headmaster Rohan Brown abruptly cutting a student’s hair that was front page news, but rather what came next.

It was a day in early March when school photos were being taken, and as the young lad walked through the front gate of Trinity Grammar, a prominent boy’s school in Melbourne, Brown noticed the length of his hair. As he had done on other occasions, he pulled a pair of scissors out of his pocket and snipped a lock of hair. Only this time, it was captured on a fellow student’s iPhone, posted on social media, and within days Brown was dismissed, after more than thirty years teaching at the school.

However, that was not the end of the story but rather the start, with several weeks of student-led protests, meetings, and online petitions to “Bring Brownie Back” which reached out to drive strong parent support. Within weeks Brown was reinstated, the Headmaster resigned together with several School Board members.

Now in light of the massive student-led protests calling for action against gun violence across America in the same month, the Brown story pales in significance. Or does it? They are just two very public examples of the influence of agency, and its impact on power and authority.
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The Trouble with Amazing: Giving Praise that Matters

The Trouble with Amazing: Giving Praise that Matters | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What’s wrong with amazing? Or phenomenal? Or any other superlative we throw around a hundred times a day?

Sometimes, there’s nothing wrong with them. Sometimes they just help us express emotion. If you’re starving, and you just took your first bite of a fresh, hot burrito, phenomenal might be the only way to describe that burrito. That’s not a problem. It certainly won’t bother the burrito.

But if you’re trying to motivate someone—a student, an employee, your child—calling them amazing won’t pump them up the way you hope it will. Not in any lasting way. What’s worse, it could have the opposite effect. Here are three reasons why.
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The Place of Reflection in PD - Edutopia

The Place of Reflection in PD - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Reflection is crucial in professional development, giving new teachers and veterans a means to deeply understand new practices.
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What Is Genius Hour and How Can I Try It in My Classroom? - We Are Teachers

What Is Genius Hour and How Can I Try It in My Classroom? - We Are Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Whether you’re new to teaching or a seasoned veteran looking to keep up with the trends, you’ve probably heard the buzz about Genius Hour. Maybe you’re thinking about giving it a try but aren’t sure where to begin. WeAreTeachers has your back! Here are the basics to get you started. 
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And the Winners Are…Global Read Aloud Choices 2018 #GRA18 – GlobalReadAlound.com

And the Winners Are…Global Read Aloud Choices 2018 #GRA18 – GlobalReadAlound.com | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
After incredible reading moments, thousands of people voting, countless hours spent thinking, and much discussion had, the moment is finally here….the reveal of the books we will read aloud and connect through.

The choices of these books were not done haphazardly.

Picking our books for the Global Read Aloud is never easy, in fact, I think it gets harder every year since we try to match the incredible experience from the year before.  Every year so far, we have been able to do so, and I hope this year is no different.

With an emphasis on perspective, on understanding others, on connecting and change, I feel that all of the books and picture book authors chosen will help us see the world in a new light.  Will help us make connections.  Will help us build community both within our own classrooms, but also with all the thousands of classrooms that will participate.  As usual, I hope you like them, I hope you read them, and I hope you read all of the amazing contenders as well.  Deep breath here.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 6, 9:50 AM
I found a couple that I will purchase this summer.
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Kids These Days – Mandy Froehlich @froehlichm

Kids These Days – Mandy Froehlich @froehlichm | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"I truly believe that part of being an advocate for kids is believing that all of them, no matter what, possess redeeming qualities. I know that I see kids do absolutely amazing things with talent and grit and an awareness of other people that I don’t remember myself or my classmates having when I was their age. On the flip side, I know we have students who are so angry and struggling and do things that are unkind and frankly, sometimes violent. But, instead of asking why the students are so poorly behaved, I think the better question is what support did we miss as parents/educators/society and how can we bring out the goodness? My point being…no matter the child, if we don’t believe that there is a place inside of them that has the potential for greatness then that is more about our shortcomings than it is about them."

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For some children, reading feels like a cryptic code. We can help them crack it | Teacher Network | The Guardian

For some children, reading feels like a cryptic code. We can help them crack it | Teacher Network | The Guardian | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Reading disorders are among the most prevalent learning difficulties children have. In a mixed ability classroom, an estimated one in 10 children will have dyslexia and up to 20% need training to develop the ability to isolate sounds in words.

In 2016, an OECD report found English teenagers are the most illiterate in the developed world, with many between the ages of 16 and 19 only having a “basic” grasp of maths and English. Children at risk of reading failure can easily become vulnerable learners, and lose their self-esteem, motivation and confidence without support. These children see reading as a barrier rather than a tool for learning. It’s no wonder, then, that teaching reading is one of the highest priorities in schools.

Over the past decade there has been a wealth of studies and educational research into reading. Much more is now understood about why some children fail to crack the code on their own. With the right support, dramatic improvements can be made to bring below-average readers within the normal range for their age."

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Dora Campbell MA CCC SLP's curator insight, June 5, 9:38 AM
Not about assessment, but overall a good article about helping students with reading disorders.
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The @DavidGeurin Blog: 9 Ways to Make Learning Irresistible

The @DavidGeurin Blog: 9 Ways to Make Learning Irresistible | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
True story. The bell rang and nobody moved.

They were completely focused, totally engrossed. They probably didn't even hear the bell because they were so focused on what they were learning. Amazing, right?

How often are students counting down the minutes of each class? They have their eyes on the clock. They start packing up early, preparing themselves for the transition to the next class. Sometimes they are even lined up at the door, waiting for the bell to ring to move on to the next thing.

But not on this particular occasion. The students were so into what they were learning, the teacher had to remind them it was time to leave. You can work more on this tomorrow. You'll be late for your next class. It's time to go.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 4, 10:10 AM
The sweet feeling of flow and how to achieve it.
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Why Children Aren't Behaving, And What You Can Do About It | MindShift | KQED News

Why Children Aren't Behaving, And What You Can Do About It | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Childhood — and parenting — have radically changed in the past few decades, to the point where far more children today struggle to manage their behavior.

That's the argument Katherine Reynolds Lewis makes in her new parenting book, The Good News About Bad Behavior.

"We face a crisis of self-regulation," Lewis writes. And by "we," she means parents and teachers who struggle daily with difficult behavior from the children in their lives.

Lewis, a journalist, certified parent educator and mother of three, asks why so many kids today are having trouble managing their behavior and emotions."

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The best advice from 2018 commencement speeches

The best advice from 2018 commencement speeches | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When you’re starting something new, it can help to hear from someone who’s been there before. That’s the gist of commencement speeches. Speakers often share their personal journeys, the mistakes they made along the way, and the steps they took to succeed. They offer nuggets of wisdom that may help graduates as they embark on perhaps their most important milestone: starting their career.

But you don’t have to be graduating college to glean some takeaways from their tips. Here are five commencement speeches that have valuable messages for any stage of life.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 1, 4:07 PM
Wise people giving wise advice.
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A Day in the Life of a School Librarian (Or, Why School Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google) –

A Day in the Life of a School Librarian (Or, Why School Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google) – | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Anyone who works in the LIS field knows that librarians spend a pretty good chunk of their day explaining why their jobs are important/still relevant in the Age of Google. It’s exhausting, to say the least, but I’ve come to realize that these conversations are absolutely vital. As stories of library closures and funding cuts continue to permeate our news cycle, it’s becoming more and more important that we learn to speak up and defend our work — not just for the sake of our careers, but for the benefit of the communities we serve.

Since transitioning from public to school libraries last year, I’ve become much more concerned with the state of our province’s school library programs. Did you know that in 2017 only 52% of elementary schools in Ontario reported having a full- or part-time teacher librarian? (To put things into perspective, that’s down from 80% in 1998.) The regional inequities are also disturbing: while 93% of elementary schools in central Ontario are staffed by a librarian, only 11% of northern libraries are.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, May 30, 2:21 PM
Kids in schools need school libraries and libraries need full time librarians.