Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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4 Principals Of Digital Literacy

4 Principals Of Digital Literacy | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Digital Literacy is about being able to make sense of digital media. This occurs through meaningful and sustainable consumption and curation patterns that improve an individuals potential to contribute to an authentic community. This includes the ability to analyze, prioritize, and act upon the countless digital media 21st century citizens encounter on a daily basis."

 
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Patrick Peterson's curator insight, April 27, 2014 2:37 PM

In a maker space, students are active and there is usually a tangible result.  Students  learn to find and read technical information, collaborate with others, and organize or curate information. They apply all of  these skills to producing something.

Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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How To Design A 21st Century Assessment - TeachThought

How To Design A 21st Century Assessment - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Contemporary curriculum design involves multiple facets: engaging 21st Century skills, using digital tools, collaborating with others around the globe, performance tasks, and more. Getting these design elements into a teacher’s current curriculum demands that teachers create professional habits around Replacement Thinking.
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How ‘chatty maths’ boosted my students’ engagement and confidence in mathematics  | Tes

How ‘chatty maths’ boosted my students’ engagement and confidence in mathematics  | Tes | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Arrive at the start of a maths lesson at my school and you are likely to come across groups of pupils chatting about maths. Not necessarily, or even usually, about number or calculation, but rather about the maths of everyday life. 

You could catch pupils talking about the maths in a packet of biscuits, a glass of water, a map, or a photograph, to name just a few examples. The more cross-curricular-minded teachers may even have a topic focus, such as a Viking longboat or Greek pot for their maths chat. 

In fact, the focus could be anything at all, as long as pupils are engaging in maths-related discussions with each other.

These "chatty maths" sessions, as we have named them, are a key feature of our approach to maths teaching and learning and the impact has been huge.
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The Value of Compassion in Teaching - Edutopia

The Value of Compassion in Teaching - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Four simple ways to model and promote compassion, which is especially important for students with adverse childhood experiences.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 18, 10:46 AM
You don’t worry about a student’s homework in a situation like this, you worry about their safety and well being. Short read but it is liked to several other articles that are also important.
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30 Best Book Engines to Find Your Perfect Summer Read

30 Best Book Engines to Find Your Perfect Summer Read | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Amidst studying for tests, reading textbooks and attending classes during the semester, reading for pleasure is often the first thing that gets kicked under the rug. Summertime, however, is a college student’s nirvana; a 3-month interlude from the trials and tribulations of higher education where you can do whatever you please! For those of you who love to read, there are several excellent book search engines on the Web. They do everything from giving you the best available prices to crafting personalized recommendations. We’ve come up with a list of the 30 best ones. Take a break from studying this summer and get lost in a good old-fashioned novel why don’t you?
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 18, 10:40 AM
I am familiar with The Amazon K-9 Search and I just tried “Whichbook” and “Library Thing.” On some of the sites, you can engage in dialogue and others feature on line books for free. Little something for many.
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What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art | MindShift | KQED News

What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There’s more room to make changes within the current education system than many people think. Schools operate as they do not because they have to but because they choose to. They don’t need to be that way; they can change and many do. Innovative schools everywhere are breaking the mold of convention to meet the best interests of their students, families, and communities. As well as great teachers, what they have in common is visionary leadership. They have principals who are willing to make the changes that are needed to promote the success of all their students, whatever their circumstances and talents. A creative principal with the right powers of leadership can take a failing school and turn it into a hot spot of innovation and inclusion that benefits everyone it touches.
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32 Tips For Building Better Relationships With Students - TeachThought

32 Tips For Building Better Relationships With Students - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Building relationships with students isn’t always simple, but it’s crucial to the well-being and academic growth of all students.

Part of the reason it’s not, in fact, ’simple’ is because every student is different and there are few universal rules for engaging students. In the same way connecting with colleagues and people in your personal life can be complicated because of different contexts, interests, personalities, and communication patterns, connecting and building relationships with students in the classroom can be equally challenging.

And a distinction should be made here between building a ‘working relationship’ and authentic relationship with students. Because of your position of authority in the classroom, a ‘working relationship’ with a students is a matter of ‘classroom management’ in pursuit of ‘student engagement.’ This approach can be efficient, but the clinical tone leaves a lot on the table for the growth of students.

If you are able to authenticate that ‘working relationship’ with genuine interest and personalization, more human and affectionate terms for that relationship can grow, resulting in the often-elusive ‘student engagement’ while also making your job—and life—easier, and your classroom a more enjoyable place for everyone to be.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 12, 11:31 AM
“Authenticate that working relationship with genuine interest and personalization.” Here’s why and how.
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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns - TeachThought

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When you’re standing in front of a classroom of students who’re not quite sure they even want to be in your class, much less pay attention to what’s being said, things like neuroscience, research studies, and teaching the way the brain learns are an abstraction.

Yet, brain-targeted teaching can engage and excite students because it taps into factors that stimulate the brain, grab the attention, and set the stage for learning.
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The Grief of Accepting New Ideas - Rick Wormeli -Association for Middle Level Education

The Grief of Accepting New Ideas - Rick Wormeli -Association for Middle Level Education | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
To quote Bob Dylan, the times, they are a-changin'. We wonder, though, if teachers have the dispositions needed to make fundamental changes to their teaching practices in order to respond constructively to our changing times, especially when those changes reveal that what they were doing was less effective than their egos thought they were.

The way we teach is often a statement of who we are. If someone questions our practices, it's like they're questioning our value as teachers. Our classroom instruction, including assessment and grading, technology integration, student-teacher interactions, and more, are expressions of how we see ourselves; they are our identity. Can we navigate these frequently troubled waters without invoking self-preserving egos and drowning in resentment?
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Free Technology for Teachers: What Causes Body Odor? - A TED-Ed Lesson

Free Technology for Teachers: What Causes Body Odor? - A TED-Ed Lesson | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
What Causes Body Odor? is a new TED-Ed lesson that every middle school health teacher will want to bookmark. The lesson explains where body odor comes from, the processes that and contribute to body odor, and how antiperspirants work.
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A World that is Asking for Continuous Creation – George Couros @gcouros

A World that is Asking for Continuous Creation – George Couros @gcouros | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As we look at how we see and “do” school, it is important to continuously shift to moving from consumption to creation, engagement to empowerment, and observation to application.7 It is not that the first replaces the latter, but that we are not settling for the former. A mindset that is simply open to “growth”, will not be enough in a world that is asking for continuous creation of not only products, but ideas.
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Ideas to Help Celebrate National Poetry Month

Ideas to Help Celebrate National Poetry Month | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
April is National Poetry Month.  One of my favorite parts of the celebration is Poem in Your Pocket Day. The idea is simple:  Select a poem you love and carry it with you all day to share with classmates, family, and friends.  You can learn about the history of the event at the Academy of American Poets website.  They took the original idea and encouraged people all across the country to join in the fun of sharing a favorite poem.
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Five Ways to Sustain School Change Through Pushback, Struggle and Fatigue | MindShift | KQED News

Five Ways to Sustain School Change Through Pushback, Struggle and Fatigue | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teaching through projects, interrogating the value of grades, attempting to make learning more meaningful and connected to young people’s lives and interests, thoughtful ways of using technology to amplify and share student work. These are just some of the ways teaching and learning are changing. But moving to these kinds of learning environments is a big shift for many teachers, schools, and districts; it’s hard to sustain change once the shiny newness wears off. That’s when people tend to slip back into old habits, relying on what they know best. The transformation requires a leader who understands how to manage the change process.

“Sustained modes of change can be incredibly meaningful and yield for your community in huge ways, but you have to be incredibly intentional in order to make space for these things to happen,” said Diana Laufenberg at an EduCon 2018 session about how to lead through change. Laufenberg is the executive director of Inquiry Schools, a nonprofit working with schools around the country to make these shifts. She has come to the conclusion that there are five pillars to sustaining change: permission, support, community engagement, accountability and staying the course.
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Compassion, Creativity & Skill – Shauna Cornwell @slcornwell

Compassion, Creativity & Skill – Shauna Cornwell @slcornwell | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As always, participating in IMMOOC Season 4 has been a very valuable experience. This week’s prompt of; How are you working to make the world a better place by creating more thoughtful, compassionate, creative, and skilled individuals? really spoke to me. This question in many ways captures what I see as our end goal and ultimate mandate as educators; helping to support our students in becoming the most compassionate, creative and skilled individuals they can be to prepare them for their future.
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27 Examples of a Growth vs Fixed Mindset in Kids @seed2_stem

27 Examples of a Growth vs Fixed Mindset in Kids @seed2_stem | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
If you are a manager, parent, educator, business owner or in a serious relationship, then understanding the difference between a Growth vs Fixed Mindset is critical to your success.
I stumbled upon this concept while reading Dr. Carol S. Dweck's bestselling book Mindset  on vacation in January.  I'm such a believer in the idea that my last four articles have been on this subject, and my wife and I even created a free, fun seven day scavenger hunt for kids that will transform your child into a "Yes, I Can!" mindset.
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What causes body odor? - Mel Rosenberg TEDEd

What causes body odor? - Mel Rosenberg TEDEd | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Most of us don’t need more than one whiff to identify that generally unpleasant, characteristic smell we call body odor. But it’s a surprisingly complex phenomenon, influenced by our genetic makeup, age, diet, and hygiene. So what is this odor, exactly? Where does it come from? And can we do anything about it? Mel Rosenberg dives into the stinky science of body odor.
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108 Indigenous writers to read, as recommended by you | CBC Books

108 Indigenous writers to read, as recommended by you | CBC Books | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
FOLD, the Festival of Literary Diversity, tweeted out the names of several Indigenous authors you should know. Many readers got in the spirit and shared their own recommendations. We've highlighted their suggestions here.
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The dying art of storytelling in the classroom - The Conversation

The dying art of storytelling in the classroom - The Conversation | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Storytelling may be as old as the hills but it remains one of the most effective tools for teaching and learning. A good story can make a child (or adult) prick up their ears and settle back into their seat to listen and learn.

But despite the power a great story can have, storytelling has an endangered status in the classroom – partly due to a huge emphasis on “active learning” in education. This is the idea that pupils learn best when they are doing something – or often, “seen to be doing” something.

Any lesson in which a teacher talks for 15 or more uninterrupted minutes would be regarded today as placing pupils in too passive a role. Indeed, even in English lessons teachers now very rarely read a whole poem or book chapter to pupils, something which now worries even OFSTED."

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How to think like a programmer — lessons in problem solving - MEDIUM

If you’re interested in programming, you may well have seen this quote before:

“Everyone in this country should learn to program a computer, because it teaches you to think.” — Steve Jobs

You probably also wondered what does it mean, exactly, to think like a programmer? And how do you do it??

Essentially, it’s all about a more effective way for problem solving.

In this post, my goal is to teach you that way.
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Children shouldn't learn to code. Ultimately, machines will be better - WIRED Opinion #creativity

Children shouldn't learn to code. Ultimately, machines will be better - WIRED Opinion #creativity | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Machines are already superintelligent on many axes, including memory and processing speed. Unfortunately, those are the attributes our education system currently rewards, with an emphasis on learning by rote.

It doesn’t make sense to me. Part of my job as an investor is to attempt to predict the future – I need to make bets on the way we’ll be behaving in the next two, five, ten and 20 years. Computers already store facts faster and better than we do, but struggle to perfect things we learn as toddlers, such as dexterity and walking.

We need to rethink the way we teach our children and the things we teach them. Creativity will be increasingly be the defining human talent. Our education system should emphasise the use of human imagination to spark original ideas and create new meaning. It’s the one thing machines won’t be able to do.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 11, 4:18 PM
Creativity will always lead the way!
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Emily Esfahani Smith: There's more to life than being happy | TED Talk

Emily Esfahani Smith: There's more to life than being happy | TED Talk | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Our culture is obsessed with happiness, but what if there's a more fulfilling path? Happiness comes and goes, says writer Emily Esfahani Smith, but having meaning in life -- serving something beyond yourself and developing the best within you -- gives you something to hold onto. Learn more about the difference between being happy and having meaning as Smith offers four pillars of a meaningful life.
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50 Things You Can Say To Encourage A Child - TeachThought

50 Things You Can Say To Encourage A Child - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There are many ways to encourage a child, but for students of any age, honest, authentic, and persistent messages from adults that have credibility in their eyes are among the most powerful.

The National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning has put together the following list, 50 Ways To Encourage A Child. It was designed for younger students (head start/kindergarten), but with the exception of 4, 17, 21, and maybe 40, they’re actually useful for K-12 in general. It all depends on your tone, the situation, and who else is listening.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 10, 4:18 PM
 Say it, look it, mean it. Often!
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5 Ways to Celebrate Poetry- Edutopia 

5 Ways to Celebrate Poetry- Edutopia  | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
During National Poetry Month and all year long, try these fun exercises with students of all ages to encourage a love of poetry.
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25 Pedagogy Ideas that Teachers found on Twitter – UKEDCHAT

25 Pedagogy Ideas that Teachers found on Twitter – UKEDCHAT | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In our survey, we asked teachers to tell us about resources that they found on Twitter which they then implemented in the classroom. Here are 25 of the most commonly shared ideas:
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The Library Voice: 18 #Facebook #Groups Connecting #School #Librarians! @shannonmmiller

The Library Voice: 18 #Facebook #Groups Connecting #School #Librarians! @shannonmmiller | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When Linda Dougherty shared this post in the Future Ready Librarian Facebook Group yesterday, I asked her I could repost it on my blog.  It is such an amazing list of of places on Facebook that all of us can connect, share and inspire each other.  
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Why slowing down can actually help us achieve more

Why slowing down can actually help us achieve more | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Leah Weiss believes that when we pay attention to how we do our work—our thoughts and feelings about what we do and why we do it—we can tap into a much deeper reservoir of courage, creativity, meaning, and resilience.

As a researcher, educator, and author, Weiss teaches a course called “Leading with Compassion and Mindfulness” at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, one of the most competitive MBA programs in the world, and runs programs at HopeLab.

Weiss is the author of the new book How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim your Sanity and Embrace the Daily Grind, endorsed by the Dalai Lama, among others. I caught up with Leah to learn more about how the practice of mindfulness can deepen our individual and collective purpose and passion.


Via Edumorfosis
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, April 9, 8:20 AM
“PAYING ATTENTION TO OUR NONATTENTION,” “DIGGING DEEP,”
MINDFULNESS AND TECHNOLOGY,  MONICA WEISS - 
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27 Characteristics Of Authentic Assessment - TeachThought

27 Characteristics Of Authentic Assessment - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Ed note: This post by the late Grant Wiggins has been republished from a previous post. Please visit Authentic Education to support the work his wife and peers are continuing.

What is “authentic assessment”?

Almost 25 years ago, I wrote a widely-read and discussed paper that was entitled: “A True Test: Toward More Authentic and Equitable Assessment” that was published in the Phi Delta Kappan. I believe the phrase was my coining, made when I worked with Ted Sizer at the Coalition of Essential Schools, as a way of describing “true” tests as opposed to merely academic and unrealistic school tests. I first used the phrase in print in an article for Educational Leadership entitled “Teaching to the (Authentic) Test” in the April 1989 issue.

(My colleague from the Advisory Board of the Coalition of Essential Schools, Fred Newmann, was the first to use the phrase in a book, a pamphlet for NASSP in 1988 entitled Beyond standardized testing: Assessing authentic academic achievement in secondary schools. His work in the Chicago public schools provided significant findings about the power of working this way.)
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 2, 1:14 PM
Grant Wiggins' article is dated, but useful. Authentic assessment includes authentic problems to be solved given a context. It does not mean students only do projects and do authentic assessment tasks. Good teachers understand that they lay the ground work for the projects and assessment.