Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Tips and Resources for a Paperless Classroom

Tips and Resources for a Paperless Classroom | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
“Productivity is never an accident. It is always the result of a commitment to excellence, intelligent planning, and focused effort.” By Paul J. Meyer You can go paperless, or at least ...
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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change.

The human brain.

But neuroscience isn’t exactly accessible to most educators, rarely published, and when it is, it’s often full of odd phrasing and intimidating jargon. Worse, there seems to be a disconnect between the dry science of neurology, and the need teachers have for relevant tools, resources, and strategies in the classroom.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 6, 8:38 AM
Knew many but I have quite a few to master. Start with the ones you use and check your understanding. Occasionally add to.
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, December 7, 4:39 AM
Verrijk uw neurologisch-didactische vocabularium en spreek voortaan eenzelfde taal in uw team. 
Simon Vuillaume's curator insight, December 15, 3:54 AM

The Neuroscience of Learning: 41 terms every teacher should know.... As well as trainers and instructional designers ... Here are my top 17:

- Affective filter

- Cognition

- Dopamine

- Executive Functions

- Hippocampus

- Limbic System

- Long-Term Memory

- Metacognition

- Neuronal Circuits

- Neuroplasticity

- Numeracy

- Patterning

- Prediction

- Prefrontal Cortex

- Rote Memory

- Serotonin

- Short-Term Memory (working memory)

Don't forget to take care of your brain !

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How Do You Know When A Teaching Strategy Is Most Effective? John Hattie Has An Idea

How Do You Know When A Teaching Strategy Is Most Effective? John Hattie Has An Idea | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Untangling education research can often feel overwhelming, which may be why many research-based practices take a long time to show up in real classrooms. It could also be one reason John Hattie’s work and book, Visible Learning, appeals to so many educators. Rather than focusing on one aspect of teaching, Hattie synthesizes education research done all over the world in a variety of settings into meta analyses, trying to understand what works in classrooms.

He has calculated the effect sizes of every teaching technique from outlining to project-based learning, which often tempts people to believe the strategies with low effect sizes don’t work and the ones with large effect sizes do. But Hattie — who is director of the Melbourne Educational Research Institute at the University of Melbourne — is the first to disavow this interpretation of his work. Instead, he and colleague Gregory Donoghue have developed a model of learning that proposes why different strategies may be effective at different stages of the learning cycle.
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D33ana Sumadianti's curator insight, December 11, 9:50 PM
Skill, will and thrill in each learner. 
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The World Might Be Better Off if We Rethink Education

The World Might Be Better Off if We Rethink Education | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Educators—at all levels, including and maybe especially college—need to take a hard look at themselves and understand how they teach affects the results they are hoping to achieve. They need to know who they are teaching. They need to stop shaming their students and blaming them for not learning, especially when the way they are teaching students results in the lack of learning and understanding that they decry in their students.
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A Fun Game About Ecosystems

A Fun Game About Ecosystems | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Feed the Dingo is a fun game that teaches students about the importance of maintaining balanced ecosystems. In the game students have to build and maintain a desert ecosystem. The game begins with a blank slate to which students have to add plants and animals. The game plays out over twelve virtual days. Each day students have to add more elements in order to maintain balance in the ecosystem. At the end of each day students are given feedback as to which plants and animals are healthy, which are in danger, and which have died.
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Study finds reading information aloud to yourself improves memory

Study finds reading information aloud to yourself improves memory | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
You are more likely to remember something if you read it out loud, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

A recent Waterloo study found that speaking text aloud helps to get words into long-term memory. Dubbed the “production effect,” the study determined that it is the dual action of speaking and hearing oneself that has the most beneficial impact on memory.

“This study confirms that learning and memory benefit from active involvement,” said Colin M. MacLeod, a professor and chair of the Department of Psychology at Waterloo, who co-authored the study with the lead author, post-doctoral fellow Noah Forrin. “When we add an active measure or a production element to a word, that word becomes more distinct in long-term memory, and hence more memorable.”
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Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, December 4, 3:08 PM

Es simple, lo comprendieron generaciones desde la invención de la escritura y más aún desde la invención de la imprenta. leer mejora la memoria - y el uso de los telefonos moviles más o menos inteligentes está dañando ya la memoria de muchos que no se dan cuenta de que ADEMAS deben leer

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, December 6, 1:36 AM
My children revised by reading and reciting allowed right up to A'level. It does work. 
Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 14, 9:07 AM
I believe this and practice it myself.
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How to Stop Killing the Love of Reading - Cult of Pedagogy

How to Stop Killing the Love of Reading - Cult of Pedagogy | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
If I had to pick one thing that makes the biggest difference in the quality of any person’s education, the quality of their life, really, it would be reading. And I’m not really talking about basic literacy—not about the ability to read—I’m talking about reading for pleasure, to satisfy curiosities, to understand how people work and find solace in knowing we are not the only ones who think and feel the way we do.

That kind of reading.

But when I see what my kids do in school for “reading,” it doesn’t really look like reading. I ask them what books they are reading in school, and a lot of times they give me a blank stare. What they do in reading, they tell me, is mostly worksheets about reading. Or computer programs that ask them to read passages, not books, and answer multiple-choice questions.
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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so.

The latter is a topic for another day, but the former is why we’re here. This is part 2 of a short series (can two articles be considered a series?) built around the idea of questions as learning tools. Part 1  “A Guide For Questioning In The Classroom.”
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 2, 9:31 AM
The power of god d questions.
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Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics – TeachThought

Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics – TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As academic standards shift, technology evolves, and student habits change, schools are being forced to consider new ways of framing curriculum and engaging students in the classroom, and project-based learning is among the most successful and powerful of these possibilities.

Of course, content knowledge matters. It’s hard to be creative with ideas you don’t understand. Academics and their ‘content’–organized in the form of ‘content areas’ like literature, math, and science–are timeless indexes of the way we have come to understand the world around us through stories, patterns, numbers, measurements, and empirical data.

The idea here, though, is that we (i.e., the field of public education) have become distracted with academics. Knowledge is only useful insofar as students tend to use that knowledge as they grow into adults that live through doing so. Studying philosophy or physics or poetry but not living through them–that’s the difference between knowledge and academics.
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6 Types of Blended Learning - TeachThought

6 Types of Blended Learning - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Blended Learning is not so much an innovation as it is a natural by-product of the digital domain creeping into physical spaces.

Broadly speaking, blended learning just means a mix of learning online and face-to-face, which means it’s likely your students are already doing some form of blended learning, and have for years.

As digital and social media become more and more prevalent in the life of learners, it was only a matter of time before learning became ‘blended’ by necessity.
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Empowering Students to Curb Bullying - Edutopia

Empowering Students to Curb Bullying - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Standing up to bullying can be frightening, but students can use these low-risk strategies to support peers who are bullied.
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How to Make High School More Like Kindergarten

How to Make High School More Like Kindergarten | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"One of the great innovations in education was the concept of the play-based early-childhood education, or kindergarten, developed by Friedrich Fröbel in the 19th century. For centuries we have accepted a model of playful exploration in the early years, a model that gradually shifts, in the elementary years, to a more desk-bound approach, in which the teacher provides information and students demonstrate that they have understood that information. This works for some kids, but for others, it’s, well, stultifying. School becomes something to be endured rather than enjoyed.


But what if schooling in the upper elementary grades, or even high school, didn’t turn into an exercise in rote memorization, or fact regurgitation, or testing and achievement metrics? That’s the premise of Lifelong Kindergarten: Cultivating Creativity Through Projects, Passion, Peers, and Play, a new book by Mitchel Resnick, the LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab."

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Available: Free Teaching Materials On Healthy Food Choices For Children - TeachThought

Available: Free Teaching Materials On Healthy Food Choices For Children - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Available: Free Teaching Materials On Healthy Food Choices For Children contributed by Debbie Bookstaber This post is sponsored by Hooray 4 Healthy Curriculum Physical activity and healthy food options are important for children’s brain development, fitness level, and general comfort and contentment as growing human beings. The goal isn’t to ‘eat well,’ but rather is, …

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Yashy Tohsaku
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5 Strategies to Demystify the Learning Process for Struggling Students

5 Strategies to Demystify the Learning Process for Struggling Students | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Barbara Oakley’s professional biography does not suggest that she was once a struggling math and science student: She is an engineering professor, author of A Mind For Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science and Mindshift: Break Through Obstacles to Learning and Discover Your Hidden Potential (which is not affiliated with this MindShift). Oakley co-created Coursera’s most popular course, “Learning How to Learn,” with Terrence Sejnowski, which has enrolled nearly 2 million students. 

But Oakley is a self-described “former math flunky” who “retooled” her brain — and who has since made it her life’s work to help others learn how to learn by explaining some key principles from modern neuroscience. 
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, December 13, 3:47 AM
Vijf stevige handvaten om het leren vast te pakken. 
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3 Ideas For Taking Care of Yourself Before the Break - George Couros @gcouros

3 Ideas For Taking Care of Yourself Before the Break - George Couros @gcouros | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"As many educators across North America are about to go on Winter break, I know that the holidays do not necessarily mean “no stress,” but for some, could be a different kind of stress.

The week before the break can be exhausting and John Spencer, recently wrote, “Ten Creative Alternatives to Showing Movies Before the Break,” that may give you some ideas before the end of the calendar year. Not only does he provide excellent ideas to stoke the wonder of your students before the break, but this little reminder:

"Let’s just put it out there. December is exhausting for teachers. The days are shorter. The weather grows colder and (at least here in Oregon) wetter. Students are anxious — whether it’s a buzzing excitement for vacation or a sense of dread that some kids feel in homes that are unsafe during the holidays.

And teachers are tired. They’re tired of redirecting behaviors and tired of the mid-year pressure of the test and simply tired of the sheer energy it takes to be a teacher."

So to build on that, I want to give a few ideas of things to remind yourself before the break, that I have been working on personally."

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 14, 9:02 AM
Taking care of yourself is better for you, your family and for your work.
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These 9 Board Games Will Help Your Kids Build Money Smarts

These 9 Board Games Will Help Your Kids Build Money Smarts | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Looking for a way to make learning about money fun? A family board game might be the perfect solution. Money games for kids will help them learn about money management while having a great time. Here are some ideas of games for kids about money. Most of these are best for children ages 8 and up, as they take up to several hours to play and involve complex and abstract ideas.
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When Will We Get Serious about Teacher Stress? – Ideas and Thoughts - Dean Shareski @shareski

When Will We Get Serious about Teacher Stress? – Ideas and Thoughts - Dean Shareski @shareski | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I’m privileged to work with some of the very best educators around the world. I’m continually inspired and in awe of their expertise, energy and commitment to their craft. They are true artists.  I marvel at these artists and the different ways they approach teaching and learning.

Of late, I’ve become acutely aware of one sad commonality among these very good people. Teachers are stressed. One could argue teachers have always been stressed but I’m sensing something new and disturbing. Today’s headline confirms some of my hunches. I’m sure some will read this article and suggest teachers are weak or lazy or manipulative. However, it’s the increase that needs to be noted. Perhaps teachers are taking better care of themselves and thus are taking time to recover rather than bringing their sickness back to the classroom. If that’s the case I see a problem in a job that requires employees to take that much time off.
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Tips And Tricks To Keep Kids On Track During Genius Hour Projects

Tips And Tricks To Keep Kids On Track During Genius Hour Projects | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When Sean Crevier accidentally wandered into the room where educators at a Milwaukee Edcamp were discussing 20 percent time projects, also known as Genius Hour, he stayed only out of politeness. He had no idea the stories colleagues shared there would change how he teaches. For the past six years, Crevier has been letting his students choose and drive the learning involved in these projects. And he has honed some systems and tools to help kids find success with a style of learning that is often quite different from their previous experiences of school.

“You are going to have to sell it to your kids because for a lot of kids coming in, sitting down, taking notes and regurgitating is a lot easier,” Crevier told educators at the International Society for Technology in Education conference. And, he points out, this attitude from students is understandable; it’s the path of least resistance. But he still thinks it’s worth carving out the time in a busy school year to do 20 percent time projects because of the life skills he has watched students develop along the way.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 5, 8:24 AM
I like the fact that this teacher’s plan calls for the S’s to step up and theT to step back.
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Debunking the Myth of the 10,000-Hours Rule: What It Actually Takes to Reach Genius-Level Excellence

Debunking the Myth of the 10,000-Hours Rule: What It Actually Takes to Reach Genius-Level Excellence | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
How top-down attention, feedback loops, and daydreaming play into the science of success.

Via Sandeep Gautam, Dean J. Fusto
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, December 3, 7:13 AM
Quality, as well as quantity of those hours matter. But, also important is scheduling downtime daily : As Jim Loeher and Tony Schwarz say, the best way to live life is as a series of sprints, not a non-stop marathon .
Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 5, 8:30 AM
I personally believe in the value of quality focused practice. I have learned best when the desired process or skill was modeled by the coach, followed by my attempts, specific feedback, more practice, and then authentic use.
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Laughter is the Best Medicine

Laughter is the Best Medicine | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
You’ve heard the saying, "laughter is the the medicine.” I must say I completely agree. I can immediately think of the people in my life that are "contagious laughers". They find the funny in most any situation and their laughter is so contagious that soon all those around them are laughing too.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, December 5, 8:33 AM
Just the right amount would make me comfortable. Not too much, not too little, but just right!
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Finding a Place in the Sun - The Meaning of Meraki  by Shauna Cornwell @slcornwell

Finding a Place in the Sun - The Meaning of Meraki  by Shauna Cornwell @slcornwell | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I am a person who often thinks “in metaphors”.  After I came across the original image years ago, it stayed with me. When I was planning for my grade 5-8 ELA students or co-planning with teachers in my role as an inquiry support teacher the image often came back to me….What were the “crates” or scaffolds I would need to put in place for each of my students to ensure they each had equitable access to the learning we were doing? How could I differentiate the learning for my students to ensure everyone would find success?
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New Infographic: The 12 C's To Managing the Modern Classroom - The Innovative Educator  @InnovativeEdu

New Infographic: The 12 C's To Managing the Modern Classroom - The Innovative Educator  @InnovativeEdu | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Time off-task. Distractions. These are problems educators new to using technology might face in their classrooms. But used correctly, technology can easily move from a weapon of mass distraction, to a tool of engagement.  


Experienced and talented #NYCSchoolsTech teachers shared their tried and true strategies and the software selections that work in their classrooms. I categorized them and wrote them up into a list. Innovative educator Eileen Lennon took that list and turned it into this infographic.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 29, 8:30 AM
Good sensible plan!
Presenters's curator insight, November 30, 3:01 AM
¿Cómo dirigir las clases modernas? En esta infografía aparecen elementos que te ayudarán mucho. 
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15 Questions To Ask When Introducing New Content To Students - TeachThought

15 Questions To Ask When Introducing New Content To Students - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It just might be that in a society where information is abundant, thinking habits are more important than knowledge.

Somewhere beneath wisdom and above the ‘things’ a student knows. Laws of economics say that scarcity increases value. It’s no longer information that’s scarce, but rather meaningful response to that information. 

Thought.

And thought has a source–a complex set of processes, background knowledge, and schema that we can, as educators think of as cognitive habits. And if they’re habits, well, that means they’re probably something we can practice at, doesn’t it?
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What Teachers Must Consider When Moving to Flexible Seating - TeachThought

What Teachers Must Consider When Moving to Flexible Seating - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Flexible seating in classrooms has become popular over the past few years as educators try to make school feel like a welcoming place with different kinds of spaces for different types of learning. Frustrated with static rows of clunky desks, some teachers have taken to rearranging their rooms, bringing in furniture from home, and generally trying to shake up the way classrooms feel by paying attention to lighting, color and clutter. Educators who have followed this path insist there are some serious considerations to keep in mind.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 29, 8:35 AM
Covers several important factors, maybe one that you didn’t consider.

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Random Acts of Kindness Ideas for Students: FREE Christmas RAK Bingo

Random Acts of Kindness Ideas for Students: FREE Christmas RAK Bingo | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The holidays are the perfect time of the year to teach students the importance of being kind. To do this, I like to have my students complete random acts of kindness throughout the month of December using a Holiday Themed RAK bingo to guide us. On this post, I will share the bingo board that I use with tips for how to use it in your classroom.
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Quick Classroom Exercises to Combat Stress

Quick Classroom Exercises to Combat Stress | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Adversity and trauma reside in our biology, not our psychology and cognition, so we educators need to prime students’ brains for learning. This calls for a deeper understanding of how our brains develop and how they respond to adversity and trauma, and how building relationships and providing strategies that promote emotional regulation can positively affect students’ emotional, physiological, and cognitive health.


I’d like to describe some practices that not only address the stress response in the limbic brain areas, but also attend to sensory and motor systems in the brain stem area. Often these systems are compromised because of chronic stress that has neurobiologically reprogrammed how the brain of a child or adolescent responds to adversity."

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