Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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A Visual Primer On Learning Theory

A Visual Primer On Learning Theory | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Theories on how people learn are not new. Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky, Skinner and others have theorized for years how it is we come to “know” things."

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, January 13, 2013 3:57 PM

This is a great graphic on four significant learning theories - well worth considering it as a display.

Dr. Ruby Parker's curator insight, August 28, 2013 5:23 PM

A great visual tool to introduce learning theory.

Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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5 Reasons Why Reading Comics Will Help Your Kids Improve Their Literacy Skills - GeekDad

5 Reasons Why Reading Comics Will Help Your Kids Improve Their Literacy Skills - GeekDad | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Babies start reading by recognizing pictures, and then continue their love of stories by progressively improving their pattern recognition and visual skills. You can start reading to your kid even before he or she is born! Picture books are a favorite for this very reason, and from a classic board book like Eric Carle′s The Very Hungry Caterpillar to a comic board book like Wonder Woman ABCs, comics can be around from the very start.
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GwynethJones's curator insight, November 11, 7:16 PM

My kiddos LOVE Comics!

Article by @GeekDads blog

Joëlle Klein's curator insight, November 13, 6:31 AM

Un article intéressant sur les BD

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How do you focus on being innovative while still teaching the curriculum? - @gcouros

How do you focus on being innovative while still teaching the curriculum? - @gcouros | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Here is a question I often get in workshops:

How do you focus on being innovative while still teaching the curriculum?

When I hear this, the viewpoint of “teaching the curriculum” and “innovation in education” is that the curriculum is on one side of the spectrum, and innovation is on the opposite side.

Working often as an outside consultant, I could tell teachers to not worry about the curriculum, “school is broken, and we need to fix it,” blah blah blah, but that would be irresponsible of me as someone who works with schools, but not employed directly.  While these teachers focus on “innovation,” they may also lose their job because they didn’t do what they were supposed to do.

What I try to get people to understand is that how we teach the curriculum, often, is the innovation.
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Jerry Busone's curator insight, November 11, 7:47 AM

For anyone developing corporate associates this is a good read... the art of inspiring innovation through focusing on the how ...

Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 11, 10:04 AM
It is the how. Teachers have to abide by the what.
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A Weekly Morale Boost for Teachers - Edutopia 

A Weekly Morale Boost for Teachers - Edutopia  | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I cannot count the number of times I’ve heard a colleague advise a student to do what makes them happy. Yet I wonder often how many teachers are happy in their jobs. In a 2012 survey, job satisfaction was at a 25-year low, teacher turnover is alarmingly high and costly, and morale is constantly under assault by social and political commentary. But who needs statistics? Just look around during a staff meeting to see the weight educators carry.

In an effort to counter these patterns, stakeholders need to build systems of support for each other. It’s even better when those support systems are grassroots efforts instead of mandated. One way I’ve done this for the past several years is through what I call the Hump Day Bump, a compilation of staff-to-staff notes of gratitude and compliments (bumps) emailed to staff each Wednesday.
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Getting Started With Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don’t Go Crazy) - Edutopia

Getting Started With Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don’t Go Crazy) - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
A handful of tips to help teachers ease into PBL without getting overwhelmed.
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Keeping Learning Real, Relevant, and Relatable - Edutopia

Keeping Learning Real, Relevant, and Relatable - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Our students are reading all day long—text messages on their phones, emailed directions about homework, apps from advertisers. They read what interests them and what helps make their world a more real, relevant, and relatable place to live. And we can tap into their interests to embed speaking, listening, reading, and writing in classes to help achieve content objectives.
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 7, 3:12 AM
Wat is nu een krachtige leeromgeving? Doe de 3xR-test en komt in de buurt. 
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Shift Your Mindset By Saying Less of These Four Things - Medium

Shift Your Mindset By Saying Less of These Four Things - Medium | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Words have enormous power —


     - the power to make or ruin someone’s day,
     - the power to encourage or embarrass,
     - the power to inspire or crush.


Words broadcast the person within. An insecure man will tear others down with his words. A fulfilled woman will make others strong.


The inverse is also true. There have been studies showing our external actions can actually change how we feel. Smiling has been shown to make you happier. Certain poses raise testosterone.
More so than smiling or standing like Wonder Woman, the words you let loose have a direct effect on you and everyone around you.


Here are 4 phrases to start farming out of your life for good."

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50 Questions To Promote Metacognition In Students - TeachThought

50 Questions To Promote Metacognition In Students - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Using the right questions creates powerful, sometimes multiple answers and discussions. Aristotle said that he asked questions in response to other people’s views, while Socrates focused on disciplined questioning to get to the truth of the matter.

Ultimately questions spark imagination, conjure emotions, and create more questions. The questions asked by a teacher or professor are sometimes more glaringly valuable than the information transferred to the students. Those questions spark a thought, which leads to a fiercely independent search for information.

If students are the ones gathering that information then they’re the ones learning it and student-driven learning cements lessons into the students’ mind making any lesson more powerful with this strategy. Even though the following list of questions are broken into Mathematics, Literature and Science and Social Science, it’s really just a set of philosophically challenging questions that should be applied to any learning environment.

The questions are unrestricted and open the mind up to unfettered thought, perfect for innovation and understanding. The sections begin with Mathematical Questions because for the purpose of this list they’re the most general and therefore the most useful.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 6, 3:57 PM
The questions are divided into categories. Question are used to spark one's imagination, activate emotions, and create more questions. Teaching and learning are about mining for questions and wondering about our teaching and learning.
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More Talking in Math Class, Please

More Talking in Math Class, Please | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Walk into a classroom in the middle of a math talk and you’ll see the students gathered in a circle, taking turns showing each other math strategies and questioning each other about the accuracy and efficiency of their solutions. The students are sharing thoughts about a single high-quality math problem they worked on solving earlier in the period without teacher guidance. They are processing the math in a different way than when they worked with paper and pencils, manipulatives, and drawings.

This opportunity to connect math and language benefits all the students and deepens their understanding of math concepts. The teacher listens as students converse about their problem-solving process. This gives her a view into the depth of understanding her students have, and alerts her to any misconceptions that should be addressed in later lessons.

After the students exchange ideas, the teacher will ask them to summarize important takeaways about today’s math concepts and strategies. Only then will she chime in with points she wants to emphasize. Here are three tips for guiding math talks."

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Schools Are Missing What Matters About Learning - The Atlantic

Schools Are Missing What Matters About Learning - The Atlantic | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When Orville Wright, of the Wright brothers fame, was told by a friend that he and his brother would always be an example of how far someone can go in life with no special advantages, he emphatically responded, “to say we had no special advantages … the greatest thing in our favor was growing up in a family where there was always much encouragement to intellectual curiosity.”

The power of curiosity to contribute not only to high achievement, but also to a fulfilling existence, cannot be emphasized enough. Curiosity can be defined as “the recognition, pursuit, and intense desire to explore, novel, challenging, and uncertain events.” In recent years, curiosity has been linked to happiness, creativity, satisfying intimate relationships, increased personal growth after traumatic experiences, and increased meaning in life. In the school context, conceptualized as a “character strength,” curiosity has also received heightened research attention. Having a “hungry mind” has been shown to be a core determinant of academic achievement, rivaling the prediction power of IQ.
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Sir Ken Robinson: How to Create a Culture For Valuable Learning

Sir Ken Robinson: How to Create a Culture For Valuable Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There are still many disagreements about how to improve the education system so that children graduate with the skills and dispositions they will need to succeed in life. Education reform discussions often center on how to tweak existing mechanisms, but what if the system itself is creating the problems educators and policymakers are trying to solve? That’s the theory favored by author and TED-talk sensation Sir Ken Robinson.
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7 Thinking Habits That Grow Strong Teachers - TeachThought

As teachers incorporate Habits of Mind into their thinking and behaviors, they say, “I need more practice with…” or “I am so excited by how much I have learned about…” or “I need to go deeper into this material…” They have developed the desire to continuously improve and learn.

Such dispositions must be developed, nurtured, supported and practiced on a regular basis. The environment and culture of the school must honor and encourage these dispositions. Schools with supportive cultures are more likely to foster significant growth among its teachers.

Like the whole child, whole teachers are a composite of human motivations and developmental drives.
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New CBC creative writing challenge invites students to imagine Canada's future in 150 years | CBC Books

New CBC creative writing challenge invites students to imagine Canada's future in 150 years | CBC Books | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The First Page is a brand new creative writing challenge for students in Grades 7 to 12, created by CBC Books.
The challenge? We want students to give us a glimpse of the great Canadian novel of the year 2167. Write the first page of a book set 150 years in the future, with the protagonist facing an issue that's topical today and setting the scene for how it's all playing out in a century and a half.
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10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills

10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Over the last couple of months I've found and written about a number of really great tools and resources to help improve our students' writing skills. This is a collection of links to reviews of ten of the best.

Via Nik Peachey
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 23, 8:34 AM
Explore and try a couple from this diverse variety of resources.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 9, 1:42 AM
10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills
D33ana Sumadianti's curator insight, November 16, 4:00 AM
Share your insight
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What Happened When I Stopped Checking Homework

What Happened When I Stopped Checking Homework | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Last year I wrote about a new strategy of not checking homework but assessing understanding through short quizzes. I thought this might be a good time to follow up with the results of that endeavor.

So, we are halfway through our second 9 weeks of school, and this is the first year where I started out not checking homework. In August, I carefully explained to students that there would be suggested homework problems and that even though I would not check their homework, there would be frequent quizzes to check their understanding.

The initial response was, “yay, no homework,” which quickly turned to “why does my grade look like this?”
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 13, 8:52 AM
If you are involved in the homework quandary or considering a change then this honest review of this teacher’s practice should help.
Nicole Masureik's curator insight, November 14, 1:34 AM
Our maths dept do this too, and it seems to work. I wonder whether it would work in other subjects...
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 14, 10:46 AM
Een boeiend verslag van een leerkracht die (voor hem) andere paden bewandelt. 
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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Part of rethinking learning means rethinking the bits and pieces of the learning process–teaching strategies, writing pieces, etc.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 10, 9:47 AM
Try some, analyze the results, & decide if the alternatives measure up.
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A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018 

A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018  | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Dawn Weber
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Donna Farren's curator insight, November 9, 10:39 AM
A great list of tools every professional can be using to keep up with their profession.
OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, November 9, 12:52 PM
A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018 | #ModernLEARNing
Jeff Fenwick Phillips's curator insight, November 13, 10:01 AM

Gus Mees does a great job of curating his site about learning in the 21st century.  The Professional Learner's Toolkit provides helpful information for designing an LMS for educators.

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3 Literacy Practices That Work - Edutopia

3 Literacy Practices That Work - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In the post “What Doesn’t Work: Literacy Practices We Should Abandon,” I wrote, “The number one concern that I hear from educators is lack of time, particularly lack of instructional time with students. It’s not surprising that we feel a press for time. Our expectations for students have increased dramatically, but our actual class time with students has not. Although we can’t entirely solve the time problem, we can mitigate it by carefully analyzing our use of class time, looking for [and doing away with] what Beth Brinkerhoff and Alysia Roehrig (2014) call ‘time wasters.’”

In this post, I take the inverse approach: identifying three research-supported practices that are especially worthy of class time. 
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How Making Art Helps Teens Better Understand Their Mental Health - Mind/Shift

How Making Art Helps Teens Better Understand Their Mental Health - Mind/Shift | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The benefits of art in a child’s education are widespread. Art can help kids express themselves and understand the world around them. Art is usually a hands-on experience and fun. For low-income students, studies have found that kids who have more arts education in school see long-term benefits by both academic and social standards.

Tori Wardrip, an art teacher at Lewis and Clark Middle School in Billings, Montana, wanted to explore the benefits of art more deeply while addressing some of the mental health issues she saw students experiencing.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 4, 5:52 PM
Do read and consider a program like Creative Courage.
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Our crowded, lengthy commutes are making us more lonely than ever

Our crowded, lengthy commutes are making us more lonely than ever | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Commuting can be bad for our health, whether it’s packed, delayed trains or mile-long traffic jams. It contributes to our anxiety, stress, and our waistlines. A recent study of British commuters found that even just a 20-minute increase in commute time is equivalent to getting a 19% pay cut for job satisfaction. Every extra minute spent travelling to and from work feels like a lifetime—and, unsurprisingly, increases strain on our wellbeing.
It’s also making us lonelier than ever.
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Veterans Affairs Canada (@veteransaffairscanada) • Instagram photos and videos

Veterans Affairs Canada (@veteransaffairscanada) • Instagram photos and videos | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Show us #CanadaRemembers by taking part in our “11 Days of Remembrance” photo-a-day challenge from November 1-11.

Use #CanadaRemembers and tag us in your photos!
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The Power of Being Seen - Edutopia

The Power of Being Seen - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When the bell rang for early dismissal on a recent afternoon at Cold Springs Middle School in Nevada, students sprinted toward the buses while teachers filed into the library, where posters filled with the names of every child in the 980-student school covered the walls.

Taking seats where they could, the teachers turned their attention to Principal Roberta Duvall, who asked her staff to go through the rosters with colored markers and make check marks under columns labeled “Name/Face,” “Something Personal,” “Personal/Family Story,” and “Academic Standing,” to note whether they knew the child just by name or something more—their grades, their family’s story, their hobbies.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 6, 4:01 PM
Early in my career, I learned two essential things about teaching. First, students want us to know who they are. They have names, faces, and stories. Second, they want to know who we are as people. This latter point was driven home when I substituted in a kindergarten class for two days, an assignment I was ill-prepared for.
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Textbooks in the digital world

For decades, textbooks were seen as the foundation for instruction in American schools. These discipline-specific tomes were a fundamental part of the educational infrastructure, assigned to students for each subject and carried in heavy backpacks every day – from home to school and back again.

The experience of students is much different today.

As a scholar of learning technologies and a director for outreach and engagement at Ohio State’s College of Education and Human Ecology, we’ve seen how technological advances and an increase in digital curriculum materials have hastened the move away from textbooks.

Does all of this technology spell the end of traditional textbooks? And if so, is that actually a good thing for students and teachers?
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Here Is A Very Good Website to Help Kids with Their Reading

Here Is A Very Good Website to Help Kids with Their Reading | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Storyline Online is an excellent literacy website to use with your kids. It helps immerse kids in    engaging reading and storytelling experiences. Storyline Online streams ‘videos featuring celebrated actors reading children’s books alongside creatively produced illustrations. Readers include Viola Davis, Chris Pine, Lily Tomlin, Kevin Costner, Annette Bening, James Earl Jones, Betty White and dozens more.’
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 30, 8:46 AM
A great literacy website that is free
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A pro wrestler's guide to confidence - TED

A pro wrestler's guide to confidence - TED | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
You are more than you think you are, says former pro wrestler Mike Kinney -- you just have to find what makes you unique and use it to your advantage. For years Kinney "turned up" the parts of himself that made him special as he invented and perfected his wrestling persona, Cowboy Gator Magraw. In a talk equal parts funny and smart, he brings his wisdom from the ring to everyday life, sharing how we can all live more confidently and reach our full potential.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 27, 9:04 AM
Turn yourself up! You are more than you think you are! Terms that I will now remember and share when I can. Watch this Ted Talk and you will be impressed with the sincerity and wisdom of this message. I’d consider sharing this with teenagers and their parents. I think that most will appreciate.
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Combining Inquiry and PBL: 3 Guidelines for Success

Combining Inquiry and PBL: 3 Guidelines for Success | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Engaging in inquiry does not mean logging hours in the library or on the computer searching for information. Especially with elementary students, inquiry happens in a variety of settings and experiences. As John Larmer, Editor in Chief of the Buck Institute, points out: “Students can find answers to their questions from many sources, including readings, but also experts, experiments, and field work.”


Via paul rayner
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 23, 8:38 AM
Seems like this is a common question for teachers. Consider these recommendations.