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Scooped by Lisa Fiano
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Non-Traditional Professional Development in the Digital World

Non-Traditional Professional Development in the Digital World | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
Technology integration, quality classroom instructional practices, and random education thoughts ... Professional learning should be continuous with each teacher leading their own professional development.
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Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from Infographics in Educational Settings
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20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics

20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
A picture is worth a thousand words – based on this, infographics would carry hundreds of thousands of words, yet if you let a reader choose between a full-length 1000-word article and an infographic that needs a few scroll-downs, they’d probably...

Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
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Is Pheed The Future Of Social Media? - Business Insider

Is Pheed The Future Of Social Media? - Business Insider | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
Social Media Insights is a daily newsletter from Business Insider that collects and delivers the top social media news first thing every morning. You can sign up to receive Social Media Insights here or at the bottom of this post.
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Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from Learning & Technology News
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JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it

Shared online videos have become quite popular. These streamed videos are so pervasive that 69% of Internet users and 52% of adults in the United States have watched or downloaded videos online (Purcell, 2010). It was predicted that videos would represent 50% of total data transfers on the Internet by 2012 (Madden, 2007). These statistics leave little doubt as to the rising importance of shared online videos for educational purposes.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 6:01 AM

Useful reading with lots of links to background reading

Ellen Graber's curator insight, March 18, 2013 8:16 AM
Videos help raise comprehension, raise motivation, and provide insight into life around the world. What have you been watching lately?
Helen Wybrants's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:43 AM

Marked for T&L interest -

Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from eLearning Stuff
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Twitter for Professional Development | e-Learning

Twitter for Professional Development | e-Learning | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
Learn from several great educators why Twitter is a tremendous tool for professional development. Twitter for Professional Development from Jeff Herb on Vimeo. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Your email address will not be ...

Via stevebatch
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Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from Universal Design for Learning for educators
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Universal design for learning / Effective pedagogy / Media gallery / Curriculum stories / Kia ora - NZ Curriculum Online

Universal design for learning / Effective pedagogy / Media gallery / Curriculum stories / Kia ora - NZ Curriculum Online | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it

Via chrissiebutler
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chrissiebutler's curator insight, June 23, 2013 2:16 AM

One of the first times I tried to capture a 101 snapshot of Universal Design for Learning for NZ colleagues.

Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Charlotte Danielson on Teaching and the Common Core

Charlotte Danielson on Teaching and the Common Core | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
Teaching expert Charlotte Danielson discusses the effects of the common standards on instructional practice and teacher professional development.

Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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How effective is the professional development undertaken by teachers? | David Weston - Guardian

How effective is the professional development undertaken by teachers? | David Weston - Guardian | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it

A fair amount of teacher professional development (also known variously as teacher training, inset, CPD or professional learning) is really bad. I don't just mean that it's poor value for money or insufficiently effective - it's much worse than that. A large swathe of training has no effect whatsoever on pupil outcomes.


Via catspyjamasnz, Peter B. Sloep
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catspyjamasnz's curator insight, March 18, 2013 8:32 AM

This article makes the case for networked staff development:

 

process of training must start with a clear identification of need. Pupils work better knowing the purpose of learning, and so do we!

 

Secondly, once the need is clearly identified, teachers need to access expertise both within school and from outside. Training that fails to take in to account local knowledge and context is likely to be irrelevant, less effective, and poorly received in the same way that teaching that ignores pupil's own knowledge is ineffective.

External expertise matters to avoid group think and false glass ceilings, and to make sure precious development time is focused on genuinely effective approaches.

 

training has to be sustained. Once they've tried it out they need to access the expertise again on several occasions to build their own confidence, correct misunderstandings, and overcome barriers.

 

 

Lastly, professional development has to be active and collaborative. Us teachers are just as prone to tuning out of a "lecture" and contemplating lunch instead as any pupil.

Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 18, 2013 11:47 AM

The essence is this: "... the good news is that great teacher learning is a remarkably similar beast to the great pupil learning". The article then explains how great teacher training starts with asking teachers for their needs and then designing your offer (rather than the other way around and starting with the courses you have). (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by Lisa Fiano from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning | Professional Development Tools | Scoop.it
The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

 

Giving teachers and students as much autonomy as possible in choosing their own curricular material is another way that we can improve student engagement.

 

Only students who are intrinsically motivated to be engaged in school will end up truly challenged, enriched, energized and ultimately fulfilled by their experience. Yes it’s an ideal, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:54 AM
You should take a look at this link: http://www.maccoby.com/Articles/4Rs_Of_Motivation.shtml. Maccoby states there is a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards: "mix of four Rs: Responsibilities, Relationships, Rewards, Reasons". Maccoby's paragraph on responsibilities focuses on the intrinsics--"People are motivated when their responsibilities are meaningful and engage their abilities and values." Meaning is something personal, ie intrinsic. He also discussed personal challenges when he said, "Craftsmen are motivated by the challenge to produce high–quality products." I liken this to an artist's aesthetics for creating art.
In his section on "Relationships", I wonder if the quality of a relationship is an extrinsic reward/acknowledgement or intrinsic or a mixture of both.
In the part about "Rewards", he does the most exploration of extrinsic rewards, namely about "pay", but he also states, "However, Jönsson finds that 80–85 percent of people who receive recognition for a job well done are satisfied even if it is not monetary, compared to 45–50 percent of those who are not recognized for their work." Which is along the lines of what I was saying about acknowledgements. They are more highly valued, but still extrinsic.
Finally, in his section "Reasons", Maccoby notes, "Jönsson reports that Chinese workers are especially motivated because they have a sense that they work not only for themselves, but also for their country. They feel proud of being part of a winning team that is building a powerful economy. According to Jönsson, in China more than in the West, workers are interested in and aware of their company’s vision, and they see their own work in this larger context." This again is mixing intrinsics and extrinsics.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.