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Obama introduces privacy Bill of Rights for online users

Obama introduces privacy Bill of Rights for online users | privacy | Scoop.it

The Obama administration has released a modern-day Bill of Rights to address protecting web users' privacy rights and offering them more control of the information they share.

 

"As the internet evolves, consumer trust is essential for the continued growth of the digital economy," President Obama said in a statement. "That's why an online privacy Bill of Rights is so important. For businesses to succeed online, consumers must feel secure."

 


Via Prof Lockman
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Rescooped by JodiGreenspan from Privacy and Surveillance
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Be Very Afraid: New Surveillance Tech and the Fourth Amendment | We Meant Well - Peter Van Buren

Be Very Afraid: New Surveillance Tech and the Fourth Amendment | We Meant Well - Peter Van Buren | privacy | Scoop.it

n a unanimous 9-0 ruling in United States v. Jones, the U.S. Supreme Court has declared that police must get a search warrant before using GPS technology to track criminal suspects. But what does this ruling, hailed as a victory by privacy advocates, really mean for the future of privacy and the Fourth Amendment?


While the Court rightly recognized that the government’s physical attachment of a GPS device to Antoine Jones’ vehicle for the purpose of tracking Jones’ movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment, a careful reading of the Court’s opinion, written by Justice Antonin Scalia, shows that the battle over our privacy rights is far from over.


Via Prof Lockman
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The NSA isn't the only US government agency making privacy obsolete - Open Democracy

The NSA isn't the only US government agency making privacy obsolete - Open Democracy | privacy | Scoop.it

Increasingly, the relationship between Americans and their government has come to resemble a one-way mirror dividing an interrogation room. So here’s a beginner’s guide to some of what’s happening on the other side of that mirror.


Via jean lievens
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After NSA revelations, a privacy czar is needed - Washington Post

After NSA revelations, a privacy czar is needed - Washington Post | privacy | Scoop.it
After NSA revelations, a privacy czar is needed
Washington Post
... but the federal government has no uber-guru in charge of U.S. privacy policy.
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The end of online privacy?

The end of online privacy? | privacy | Scoop.it

Phone apps help themselves to our contacts, Google tracks our web history, and supermarkets monitor our buying habits. Can anything stop the great data grab?


If you use a smartphone and download apps, you've probably used an app which pops up a dialog box pop asking ''Find your friends?'' and offering to search some new social network - or one of the more familiar ones - for people you already know

 


Via Prof Lockman
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Rescooped by JodiGreenspan from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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NSA Apologist Says The NSA's Actions Are Fine Because 'Privacy Is Dead' | Techdirt

NSA Apologist Says The NSA's Actions Are Fine Because 'Privacy Is Dead' | Techdirt | privacy | Scoop.it

When we last discussed columnist Froma Harrop, she was acting as a surveillance state apologist. She took some of the usual paths (directing snark at "clueless" internet users, conjuring up the threat of terrorism) and some unusual ones (claiming those opposed to the surveillance state only did so because they "hate Obama"). All in all, it was the perfect storm of condescension and cluelessness that NSA apologists do all too well.

Harrop's back again, offering an unsolicited eulogy for privacy and some plaudits for the surveillance state. She lays this all out in seven easily refutable statements, which makes a point-by-point takedown a breeze. Kudos for that, Froma.

After telling us to "relax" because the government has the ability to "collect and recall our every keystroke," she opens up her Seven Point Plan by telling us to submit.

 

1. Admit that we are powerless to stop this new technology. (We don’t have to like it.)


It's seldom a good idea to open your defense of something by utilizing arguments a rapist might use. "Relax." "You're powerless." Just submit to what's coming because you can't fight it.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by JodiGreenspan from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Here’s how privacy advocates shined light on the NSA’s unconstitutional surveillance | Wash Post

Here’s how privacy advocates shined light on the NSA’s unconstitutional surveillance | Wash Post | privacy | Scoop.it

After a legal battle that went on over a year, the federal government was forced to reveal a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Court (FISC) opinion that showed the National Security Agency (NSA) engaged in unconstitutional surveillance practices, including the collection of tens of thousands of Americans’ online communications.


The Switch talked to Mark Rumold, a staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) who worked on the case, hours after the opinion was released Wednesday night. This interview has been lightly edited for clarity and length.


Click headline to read the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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