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New primary care providers join staff at North Medical Center - The Times and Democrat

New primary care providers join staff at North Medical Center - The Times and Democrat | Primary care services | Scoop.it
New primary care providers join staff at North Medical CenterThe Times and DemocratBuy Now. » 2012-10-24T06:00:00Z 2012-10-23T19:27:58Z New primary care providers join staff at North Medical CenterBy SHERRYL M.
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Transitioning Pediatric Patients to Adult Primary Care -- AAFP News ...

Family physicians need to know what to expect when they are asked to become the medical home for a young adult who is transitioning from pediatric care to adult care. However, effectively managing that transition and ...
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@DrMikeSevilla: Primary Care is Hi-Tech AND High Touch | doctoranonymousblog | Primary Care Progress

@DrMikeSevilla: Primary Care is Hi-Tech AND High Touch | doctoranonymousblog | Primary Care Progress | Primary care services | Scoop.it
@DrMikeSevilla: Primary Care is Hi-Tech AND High Touch (RT @drmikesevilla: Primary Care Advocacy doesn't end with Nat'l Primary Care Week.)...
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Big Data In Healthcare: Yes!! | The Big Data Hub

Big Data In Healthcare: Yes!! | The Big Data Hub | Primary care services | Scoop.it

The potential big data holds for transforming healthcare is even greater than other industries or sectors, but perhaps I’m biased. The industry faces daily headlines that raise issues of quality, costs and fraud. Election year or not, these issues are front page news and have been for more than one presidential term.

 

As citizens, who are also healthcare consumers, we demand that these issues be addressed. Irrespective of political parties, I think we all acknowledge that the status quo in healthcare is NOT acceptable. Here are a few examples of what big data can do:

 

Collaborative care—Collaboration in healthcare is more than people working together to treat patients. It is about connecting care delivery channels so that evidence-based insights and clinical knowledge can be coupled with patient-specific information to personalize care. Achieving this level of insight requires organizations to do a better job of aggregating trusted patient data and applying specialized knowledge to improve decision making, care delivery and health outcomes.

 

Personalized medicine—Today, it’s trial and error, with the associated time delays and costs, that many times dictates the best treatment regimen for a given patient and condition. With volumes of data available and analytics to decipher new insights, genomes of a patient can be considered in the context of clinical conditions. Precision in treatment will lead to better outcomes and eliminate cost associated with trial and error.

 

Fraud—Big data will allow private and public sector organization to integrate the variety and volume of data that is needed to systemically identify and eliminate fraud. With this knowledge in hand, then policies and practices can be changed, preventive measures executed, and costs decreased.

 

Research—With big data, researchers will have the capability to integrate and analyze data from numerous sources such as genetics, climate, clinical care, and pharmaceutical, just to name a few options. Researchers will be able to effectively analyze this data en masse, as computational limitations will no longer apply. The net will be time is saved, thus costs are decreased and new therapies, drugs, and best practices can be more rapidly established and disseminated.

 

Best practices—Defining best practices and removing the variability in care is limited by the nature of unstructured data. Big data will allow organizations to combined structured and unstructured data in analytic initiatives. And, big data can consume streaming data that is generated from monitoring and sensing devices, pedometers, glucometers, and social media, just to mention a few potential sources. All sectors of the healthcare industry have potential to tap into these key capabilities and define better, more cost effective care.


Via nrip
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AHS execs blame mistrust and poor governance for primary health care problems - Calgary Herald

AHS execs blame mistrust and poor governance for primary health care problems - Calgary Herald | Primary care services | Scoop.it
AHS execs blame mistrust and poor governance for primary health care problemsCalgary HeraldEDMONTON — Doctors' mistrust and a dysfunctional governance system combined to stall efforts to develop adequate accountability and performance standards for...
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HIV, GPs and other primary care

HIV, GPs and other primary care | Primary care services | Scoop.it
RT @THTorguk: RT @aidsmap: Thinking about telling your GP you have #HIV?
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Redefining medicine with apps and iPads

Redefining medicine with apps and iPads | Primary care services | Scoop.it

Dr. Alvin Rajkomar was doing rounds with his team at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center when he came upon a puzzling case: a frail, elderly patient with a dangerously low sodium level.

 

As a third-year resident in internal medicine, Dr. Rajkomar was the senior member of the team, and the others looked to him for guidance. An infusion of saline was the answer, but the tricky part lay in the details. Concentration? Volume? Improper treatment could lead to brain swelling, seizures or even death.

 

Dr. Rajkomar had been on call for 24 hours and was exhausted, but the clinical uncertainty was “like a shot of adrenaline,” he said. He reached into a deep pocket of his white coat and produced not a well-thumbed handbook but his iPhone.

 

With a tap on an app called MedCalc, he had enough answers within a minute to start the saline at precisely the right rate.

 

The history of medicine is defined by advances born of bioscience. But never before has it been driven to this degree by digital technology.

 

The proliferation of gadgets, apps and Web-based information has given clinicians — especially young ones like Dr. Rajkomar, who is 28 — a black bag of new tools: new ways to diagnose symptoms and treat patients, to obtain and share information, to think about what it means to be both a doctor and a patient.

 

And it has created something of a generational divide. Older doctors admire, even envy, their young colleagues’ ease with new technology. But they worry that the human connections that lie at the core of medical practice are at risk of being lost.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
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eMedToday's curator insight, August 19, 2013 10:28 PM

There is a need on a e detailing platform to have clinical reference material as shown in this post

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The Difficulties In Predicting Blockbusters - Forbes

Historically, predicting the future sales of compounds in clinical development is difficult to do. One of my favorite examples is Lipitor (atorvastatin).

Via Richard Meyer
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