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War production workers at the Vilter [Manufacturing] Company making M5 and M7 guns for the U.S. Army, Milwaukee, Wis. Ex-stage orchestra musician, checking an M7 gun with gage, after <a href="http:...

War production workers at the Vilter [Manufacturing] Company making M5 and M7 guns for the U.S. Army, Milwaukee, Wis. Ex-stage orchestra musician, checking an M7 gun with gage, after <a href="http:... | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Check out these China China Turning China manufacturing images:

War production workers at the Vilter [Manufacturing] Company making M5 and M7 guns for the U.S. Army, Milwaukee, Wis. Ex-stage orchestra musician, checking an M7 gun with gage, after China China Turning out on a gun lathe. Her two brothers and husband are in the serv


Image by The Library of Congress
Hollem, Howard R.,, photographer.

War production workers at the Vilter [Manufacturing] Company making M5 and M7 guns for the U.S. Army, Milwaukee, Wis. Ex-stage orchestra musician, checking an M7 gun with gage, after China China Turning out on a gun lathe. Her two brothers and husband are in the service

1943 Feb.

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
United States–Army
Vilter China Manufacturing Company
Women–Employment
Gunsmithing
World War, 1939-1945
United States–Wisconsin–Milwaukee

Format: Transparencies–Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 12002-21 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a34974

Call Number: LC-USW36-469

Mama


Image by jurvetson
Mama is the affectionate name for this massive mixer that handles viscous, sticky pharmaceuticals… that happen to be explosive.

The top hat is elevating with two hydraulic rams in the rear.

This Cup …item 3b.. Macintosh Turns 30 (January 22 2014) — Apple 1984 …item 4b.. The importance of being aware of your privacy (Jan. 29, 2014) — Ignorance may be bliss, but it is also perilous. …


Image by marsmet501
Granted, I do recognize there are a lot of benefits for the government from collecting as much information as they can. I’m someone who believes knowledge is power, and knowing as much as possible is a good way to defend yourself. The problem is that said knowledge comes at the expense of privacy more and more these days.
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………*****All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ………
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… marsmet501 photostream … marsmet501 …

m.flickr.com/#/photos/63583766@N04/

Thursday, April 3, 2014

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m.flickr.com/#/photos/63583766@N04/12118710586/

2014 – Black text on white background

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m.flickr.com/#/activity/

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… message header for item 1. … Miami Man Sells Quaaludes Merch, Capitalizes Off of Wolf of Wall Street

Does he think that the merchandise promotes drug use? No, only because they’re not even available anymore. He’s also a big believer in personal responsibility and moderation. If he can say one thing positive about Quaaludes, though, it’s that people never seemed to get addicted, only to enjoy them. In fact, popping half a Gorilla Biscuit made people drink less, because it took the edge off so effectively, he says. An added bonus: No hangover.

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… marsmet532a photostream … marsmet532a … Page 1

www.flickr.com/photos/115947920@N03/page1/?details=1
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… FLICKRIVER … marsmet532a … interesting

www.flickriver.com/photos/tags/marsmet532a/interesting/

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… marsmet533 photo … LA 2017 "The Name of the Game" …item 1c.. Cult TV Review (Friday, October 04, 2013) — "Freedom is always relative to the needs of the community." …item 2.. FSU News – Building our own legacy (Dec. 8, 2013) — to become more “ordinary” people. …

www.flickr.com/photos/109937567@N06/11236243576/in/photos…;
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… marsmet533 photostream … Page 1

www.flickr.com/photos/109937567@N06/?details=1

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… marsmet472 photo … September 1925 …item 3.. If you want a party at college head to the University of Iowa (5 August 2013) …item 4.. Alanis Morissette – Jagged Little Pill (full album) — "Hand in My Pocket" …

www.flickr.com/photos/96829830@N04/9091976105/in/photostream
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… marsmet472 photostream … Page 1

www.flickr.com/photos/96829830@N04/?details=1

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… marsmet552 photo … Maxim Magazine (December 2008) – Jiah Khan … "Pharmageddon": America’s New Drug Crisis — better living through better chemistry (September 4, 2011) …

www.flickr.com/photos/70731452@N04/6399626959/in/photostream
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… marsmet552 photostream … Page 2

www.flickr.com/photos/70731452@N04/page2/?details=1

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…..item 1)…. Miami Man Sells Quaaludes Merch, Capitalizes Off of Wolf of Wall Street …

… Miami New Times … blogs.miaminewtimes.com/riptide/ …

Riptide … Miami News / Crime / Sports / Debauchery

By Allie Conti … Fri., Jan. 24 2014 at 7:30 AM
Categories: Drugs

blogs.miaminewtimes.com/riptide/2014/01/miami_man_sells_q…

Ed Cobin loves Quaaludes. He hasn’t had one in about three decades, sure, but he remembers the drug fondly. About fours years back, the 65-year-old retiree made a shirt for his friend that featured the prescription pill bottle’s iconic logo. It was a hit. The friend got compliments everywhere he went, and was constantly approached by Baby Boomers wanting to swap stories about far-out times.

So Cobin, a North Miami native, decided to start a business selling Quaalude merchandise like hats, mousepads and coffee mugs that people could use to advertise their party credentials. He even called up the pharmaceutical company that used to produce the Quaalude’s amber bottle, which looks like a smaller version of the one that contains Red Stripe beer. Antique bottles were going for up to 0 a pop on Ebay, but Cobin sold his replicas for a bargain price of .
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img code photo … This Cup

blogs.miaminewtimes.com/riptide/assets_c/2014/01/quaalude…

This cup is available for purchase on the site quaaludebottle.com.

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Quaalude is the brand name of methaqualone, a sedative-hypnotic drug popular in the ’70s. It was synthesized in India, popularized in Britain and named after a shortened version of "quiet interlude." In Miami, Cobin says, it was ridiculously easy to get the drug. One would just go see a Quaalude doctor who would prescribe them for about a pill — "a scam" as the business owner puts it.

But the good times eventually came to an end. The beloved Lude was last manufactured in South Africa under the name Mandrake and was ultimately discontinued in 1984. Today, Cobin says, it has a rabid fanbase of people who tell him they would pay or a pill if they could get their hands on one. What kind of euphoria could possibly inspire such a fondness among older Floridians?

"You have a very positive feeling, you’re in a good mood, and you feel like you can talk to women," he says. "Men used to call them panty droppers or crotch teasers, because they had this effect on women."

At first, the Miami Norland Senior High grad was selling about eight items per week, making only what he calls "drinking money." A month ago, though, he noticed orders skyrocketing. He was receiving about eight times as many orders as before. It took him a while to figure out why, but a friend eventually clued Cobin in. The Wolf of Wall Street, a Scorcese flick in which Leonardo DiCaprio plays a famed Quaaludes addict, was dominating at the box office.

"Everybody was talking about Quaaludes all of a sudden," he says. "What I was selling in a week I was suddenly selling in a day." Cobin says he sent a box of merch to Scorcese and DiCaprio through their agents as a way to say thanks. He hopes they’ll spread the word.

Does he think that the merchandise promotes drug use? No, only because they’re not even available anymore. He’s also a big believer in personal responsibility and moderation. If he can say one thing positive about Quaaludes, though, it’s that people never seemed to get addicted, only to enjoy them. In fact, popping half a Gorilla Biscuit made people drink less, because it took the edge off so effectively, he says. An added bonus: No hangover.

The wistful text of Cobin’s website, though, tells a different story: "And who says that our driving abilities weren’t further improved by a Lude or two? While alcohol and coke did much to improve the party feeling, it was indeed the Quaalude that got the party going!"

As for Cobin’s craziest tale of debauchery? He remembers a 40-person party all getting naked and diving into a El Portal pool while under the influence. But another tale brings him the most joy.

"You shouldn’t drive on them, but I was on West Dixie Highway once at 2 in the morning when I turned the corner and hit something," he recalls. "I wasn’t sure if it was a person or a thing. I turned in the rear view mirror and saw it was a Bob’s Barricade — what I call a one-eyed zebra."

He laughs into the phone.

"God that’s just so many times," he says. "And it could only happen on Quaaludes."

Send your story tips to the author, Allie Conti.

Follow Allie Conti on Twitter: @allie_conti

Follow Miami New Times on Facebook and Twitter @MiamiNewTimes.
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— GET THE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER
Our weekly feature stories, movie reviews, calendar picks and more – minus the newsprint and sent directly to your inbox.
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…..item 2)…. youtube video … Play That Funky Music – Wild Cherry (1976) … 4:56 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRr2kf84V2M

djbuddyloveoldschool

Video produced by Von Regan Davis

Uploaded on Aug 5, 2009

"Play That Funky Music" was a funk rock disco song recorded by the rock band Wild Cherry and written by lead vocalist and guitarist Robert Parissi. The song hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 18, 1976 and was also number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart. The single was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for shipments of over two million records.

The autobiographical song was inspired by the times, and the song’s unforgettable title and chorus came from drummer Ron Beitle’s observation during a break between sets at the 2001 Club in Pittsburgh. The group was mostly a hard rock outfit, but the disco era was really gaining steam and many of the group’s loyal followers were asking for more dance songs. While taking a break between sets, Ron uttered the now-classic line, "Play some funky music, white boy". Lead singer Robert Parissi decided they should, and wrote down the phrase on a bar order pad.

They later recorded it in Cleveland with a disco sound. The song sold over two million copies, but was Wild Cherry’s only hit. "Play That Funky Music" was listed at #73 on Billboard’s Greatest Songs of All Time. This channel is dedicated to all the great ‘old school’ R&B music I grew up with, the stuff that originally made me tap my feet and want to be a DJ. Funk, soul, disco, R&B, dance, hip-hop, pop . . . 60s, 70s, 80s . . . whatever you call it, it’s all ‘Old School’ and it’s all here!

See my videos featuring the Roots of Rap at:
www.youtube.com/DJBuddyLoveRootsRap

If you like relaxing with some classic Cool Jazz, go to:
www.youtube.com/DJBuddyLoveCoolJazz

If you love jamming to some great Classic Rock, check out:
www.youtube.com/DJBuddyLoveClassicRR

If you like college football & other aspects of life at The Ohio State University, go to:
www.youtube.com/DJBuddyLoveBuckeyes

Check out my newer music videos and other fun stuff at:
www.youtube.com/DJBuddyLove3000

Check out my news videography stuff at:
www.youtube.com/VonReganDavis

Also, check out my youngest daughter (the world’s youngest video producer) at:
www.youtube.com/DaddyzGirl3000

To stay updated about all my projects, please ‘Like’ my Facebook fan page:
www.facebook.com/pages/DJ-Buddy-Love/114­720773004?ref=sgm

And coming in 2012 . . .
DJ Buddy Love presents LONGEVITY . . .
A world record club DJ mixing marathon charity event . . .
121 hours nonstop to benefit cancer research . . .
Live to the world via UStream, Facebook, YouTube & Twitter . . .
More details coming soon . . .

Enjoy!!

;~}

Copyright 1976 Epic Records
All Rights Reserved

Category
Music

License
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 3a)….. youtube video … Apple 1984 Super Bowl Commercial Introducing Macintosh Computer (HD) … 1:03 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zfqw8nhUwA

Robert Cole

Uploaded on Jun 25, 2010

Iconic 1984 Apple Computer Macintosh commercial conceived by Chiat/Day and directed by Ridley Scott was nationally aired on television only once – during the 3rd quarter of the 1984 Super Bowl football game.

Based on George Orwell’s novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four (authored in 1949) the spot provided the allegory of the new Apple Macintosh computer providing an inspirational creative spark that would free individuals from the overbearing control of "Big Brother" – presumably, IBM’s Personal computer.

Here’s my somewhat irreverent blog post about the ad, and the rise of Apple in terms of thinking differently, product design and control of the user experience: j.mp/Apple84

Category
Science & Technology

License
Standard YouTube License
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On January 24th, Apple Computer will introduce Macintosh. And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like "1984."
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– Michael Janik … 1 day ago

Geht es in dem Video nicht um Big-Brother. Jetzt selbst zu Big-Brother geworden, oder? Hoffe Apple gibt es bald nicht mehr. Oder die verschwinden in der Versenkung, wie in den 90igner.
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…..item 3b)…. Macintosh Turns 30: Watch The Iconic 1984 Ad That Introduced Apple’s Original PC [VIDEO] …

… INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES … www.ibtimes.com/ …

TECH / SCI
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img code photo … Mac@ 30 … MACINTOSH’S 30th Anniversary
January 25, 2014 7pm @ Flint Center
A Celebration of the people and the Team that Created the Macintosh

s1.ibtimes.com/sites/www.ibtimes.com/files/styles/v2_arti…;

Apple’s Macintosh turns 30 years old on Jan 24, 2014, with a celebration being held on Jan 25 at the Flint Center in Cupertino. Courtesy of Mac 30th

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By Cameron Fuller
on January 22 2014 4:47 PM

www.ibtimes.com/macintosh-turns-30-watch-iconic-1984-ad-i…;

Thirty years ago on Jan. 22, Super Bowl XVIII pitted the Washington Redskins against the then-Los Angeles Raiders. The game was a blowout; the Raiders dominated, crushing the Redskins 38-9 at Tampa Stadium. While today is the 30th anniversary of that game, it is what was broadcast in between plays that would make history. Apple Computers announced the product that would change the future, the Macintosh, with the tagline, “On January 24th, Apple Computer will introduce Macintosh. And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like ‘1984.’”

The commercial was completely novel, something Apple would repeat with several other ad campaigns for their innovations. It didn’t show the Macintosh computer, nor did the commercial describe its power, convenience or innovative GUI. Instead it referenced one of the most iconic books of the 20th century, George Orwell’s "1984."

Filmed on the outskirts of London, the commercial invokes a dystopian feel. Director Ridley Scott, who had released "Alien" in 1979 and "Blade Runner" in 1982, was not unfamiliar with futuristic overtones. Shot for an astonishing 0,000, the commercial played on fears that IBM had already monopolized the market. But a petite blonde woman destroys the status quo by flinging a sledgehammer through the projected face of Big Brother. Apple would go on to have several great and terrible years, even firing founder Steve Jobs in the 1990s. It wasn’t until 2001, with the launch of the first-generation iPod, that Apple began to regain the following it has now. Apple celebrates 30 years of Macintosh on Friday at its Cupertino, Calif., headquarters.

Watch the 1984 Macintosh ad below.
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image code photo … Apple -1984

video: 1:00 minute

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…..item 4a)…. Scientia potentia est … From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia …

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientia_potentia_est

The phrase "scientia potentia est" (or "scientia est potentia"[p] or also "scientia potestas est") is a Latin aphorism often claimed to mean organized "knowledge is power". It is commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, although there is no known occurrence of this precise phrase in Bacon’s English or Latin writings. However, the expression "ipsa scientia potestas est" (‘knowledge itself is power’) occurs in Bacon’s Meditationes Sacrae (1597). The exact phrase "scientia potentia est" was written for the first time in the 1651 work Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes, who was secretary to Bacon as a young man.

The related phrase "sapientia est potentia" is often translated as "wisdom is power".
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— History

… Origins and parallels

A proverb in practically the same wording is first found in Hebrew, in the Biblical Book of Proverbs (24:5): גֶּבֶר-חָכָם בַּעוֹז; וְאִישׁ-דַּעַת, מְאַמֶּץ-כֹּחַ. This was translated in the latin Vulgata as "vir sapiens et fortis est et vir doctus robustus et validus" and in the King James Version, the first English official edition, as "A wise man is strong, a man of knowledge increaseth strength".

A later account of the concept is found in the Shahnameh by the Persian poet Ferdowsi (940 – 1020 CE) who wrote: "Capable is he who is wise" (in Persian: توانا بود هر که دانا بود).[3]. This hemistich is translated to English as "knowledge is power" or "One who has wisdom is powerful".
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…..item 4b)…. The importance of being aware of your privacy …

… FSU News … www.fsunews.com/ …

FSU / section / News … www.fsunews.com/section/NEWS

Written by
Adrian Chamberlin
Senior Staff Writer

FILED UNDER
FSU News
FSU News Adrian Chamberlin

Jan. 29, 2014 |

www.fsunews.com/article/20140129/FSVIEW0303/140129025/The…;

Privacy is a valuable thing, especially to a person like myself who generally likes to fly under the radar. That’s why I pay attention to the news regarding how governments and companies track the average Internet user, and why I took special notice when Jon Wiant, a former Foreign Service Officer, an intelligence expert, and an adjunct professor at George Washington University, spoke at FSU recently about security, including data monitoring.

Wiant, in the News article published in the FSView on Monday, discusses the importance of balance when it comes to surveillance in the name of national security and constitutionally protected freedoms. I think he nailed it when advocating for balance, but I think there is currently a lack of it, especially when it comes to the advice being given to college students.

As up and coming professionals, we college students are told to do many things, like creating LinkedIn profiles to promote ourselves in our prospective careers. But we’re also told to protect our personal images and information that is online, in the sense of not having publicly available pictures of ourselves in the midst of Hangover-esque debauchery.

I can’t help but think of a song here, one called “Signs,” by Five Man Electrical Band. One of the lines is “Do this, don’t do that, can’t you read the sign?” which is referring to all the conflicting instructions in life. I think that lyric is especially apt when talking about cyber security, data monitoring, and online footprints.

On top of the conflicting advice, as the electronic cherry on this surveillance-sundae, is the fact that whistleblower Edward Snowden has exposed the National Security Agency, or NSA, as being heavily involved in large scale spying on American citizens and people all over the world. In fact, according to recently released documents and an article in The Guardian, surveillance agencies like the NSA have now gone so far as to target apps like Angry Birds that are considered “leaky” with the personal information of their users.

So I see some serious cognitive dissonance being created here. After all, college students are told we need to market ourselves effectively, while at the same time protecting our personal data, while also simultaneously reading news that the NSA is collecting practically every scrap of data they can get their hands on.

Granted, I do recognize there are a lot of benefits for the government from collecting as much information as they can. I’m someone who believes knowledge is power, and knowing as much as possible is a good way to defend yourself. The problem is that said knowledge comes at the expense of privacy more and more these days.

After all, if you collect data to defend freedom, but collecting that data violates core principles of your freedom, haven’t you just attacked yourself? Unfortunately, that is only a rhetorical question that I can’t even answer myself. All I can do is try to draw attention to the disconnect present between what college students, and all Americans are being advised to do, and what is actually being done to us.

It would be easy to close with a quip or quote by someone relatively famous regarding freedom and privacy, but I’ll focus on asking one last favor instead. That favor is directed at everyone, FSU student or otherwise, and it is to ask all of us to be aware of our surroundings, including our privacy. Ignorance may be bliss, but it is also perilous.
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The Truck

The Truck | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Check out these large machining images:

The Truck


Image by tamahaji

A 1988 VINTAGE NYLINT MIGHTY MUSCLE – SOUND MACHINE HARLEY DAVIDSON SEMI TRACTOR TRAILER. THIS TRUCK IS ONE OF ONLY 5000 MADE AND THAT THEY ARE HIGHLY COLLECTABLE . MADE FROM PRESSED STEEL AND WHEN I BOUGHT IT, THIS TRUCK IS STILL IN ITS BOX AS EVIDENCED BY THE PLASTIC BAND SECURING THE TRUCK TO THE BOX BEING IN TACT. THE TRUCK MEASURES 25 INCHES LONG AND 7 INCHES HIGH AND IS IN MINT CONDITION.

yellow crane


Image by Beaulawrence
Camera: Konica MT-7
Film: Kodak Portra 160

(www.tinymachining.com)
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Precision China Machining Services - www.cncmachiningservicesuk.com

Precision China Machining Services - www.cncmachiningservicesuk.com | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Precision China Machining Services http://cncmachiningservicesuk.com CNC China Machining Services UK The majority of companies in the UK-specifically CNC China machining servi…

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CNC Mill Plastic Rapid Prototype

CNC Mill Plastic Rapid Prototype | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Visit.www.datron.com. DATRON CNC China Milling China China Machines are high-speed machining centers designed for efficiency with small micro tools. Capable of milling, drilli…
Video Rating: 0 / 5

My Website http://machineworkshop.com/ Help Support CncShopMill http://goo.gl/GRG0RG This video shows how easy is is to make a prototype part when your mill …

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Most popular Cost Of Cnc China Machining auctions

Cost Of Cnc China Machining on eBay:

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Autodesk Inventor Sheet Metal Components for Frame Generator

Autodesk Inventor Sheet Metal Components for Frame Generator | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

In a world where mitered corners and flat patterns simply don’t co-exist, there is a man destined to overcome. When other say it can’t be done; he alone sear…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Lastest Precision China Machined Products auctions

Some recent precision machined products auctions on eBay:

10PC INSERTS MIGATRON PRECISION PRODUCTS SPE 53 ZRA TM MACHINE SHOP

$19.99
End Date: Friday Jul-25-2014 9:39:41 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $19.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
10PC MIGATRON PRECISION PRODUCTS SPE 53 ZRA AM INSERTS MACHINE SHOP TOOLMAKER $24.99
End Date: Friday Jul-25-2014 9:50:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $24.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

World Products Inc. 1993 Edition Precision Machined Castings Catalog $14.95
End Date: Tuesday Jul-29-2014 11:31:09 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $14.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list (www.tinymachining.com)
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Most popular Cnc Turned Components auctions

cnc China turned components eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

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Ground Zero . . . Progressing . . .

Ground Zero . . . Progressing . . . | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Some cool China grinding images:

Ground Zero . . . Progressing . . .


Image by daystar297
Please View Large Here

I’m looking forward to when construction is completed . . . and it will be called Freedom Tower instead of Ground Zero . . . hopefully the new name will also signal a time when we understand that there’s one Planet . . . and that we’re all members of One Human Family . . .

Watching Ground Zero . . .


Image by daystar297
View Large Here

Looking out from the World Financial Center to the Ground Zero site in lower Manhattan

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Army Photography Contest - 2007 - FMWRC - Arts and Crafts - Beluga

Army Photography Contest - 2007 - FMWRC - Arts and Crafts - Beluga | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Check out these online machine shop quotes images:

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Beluga


Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Beluga

Photo By: PO3 Stephen Gonzalez

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, China etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid China etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, China engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
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Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – An Eternal Lullaby


Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – An Eternal Lullaby

Photo By: SSG Robert Stewart

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History
After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, China etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid China etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, China engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

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Amazing small models of workshop machines

Amazing small models of workshop machines | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

A few nice precision machine shops images I found:

Amazing small models of workshop machines


Image by Vilseskogen
American Precision Museum, Windsor, VT, USA.

Amazing small models of workshop machines


Image by Vilseskogen
American Precision Museum, Windsor, VT, USA.

Cupola of American Precision Museum


Image by Steph L.

(www.tinymachining.com)
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The Portable Atelier, Nyc.

The Portable Atelier, Nyc. | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

A few nice metal parts china images I found:

The Portable Atelier, Nyc.


Image by atelier-ying
This is my camera bag that follows me everywhere, even inside my own home. I also toss it into the baby stroller.

Let’s take a tour starting clockwise from the upper left, shall we?

1. Turano iPad bag with 4 compartments and some dividers. I wish they made this in red or army green or clear smoky plastic.
2. metal drafting triangle, I did forget to include my elliptical and circle templates which I use.
I have a miniature engineer’s scale but there’s no real reason to use it for what I’m doing, my cameras designs stand without toppling over and there’s no standardized dimension of camera building materials to concern myself over. Actually, glue, tape, and architectural modeling supplies are my materials for the most part.
3. the Ricoh GRD3 is tuned for taking only baby photos. I treat it like a film camera; I don’t use the LCD at all, it’s got two settings for color or b&w, and I toss the used chips into a small plastic box. I will have to spend a week on the computer downloading and editing, maybe when my kids turn two years of age.
4. old-fashioned fan. I really use this. it feels so good in the hand, very practical. And good for fanning a restless baby in the stroller. I’d like to get a sandalwood one from HK.
5. Moleskine notebooks. The largest one fits in the Turano, amazingly. I have many sizes of these black notebooks. Actually, I have a red suitcase from my childhood full of nothing but notebooks.
6. Name seals and red ink paste.
7. Office date stamp
8. Muji measuring tape, in millimeters, you never know when you need to measure camera dimensions and distances.
9. Yellow tape, pencil sharpener (sandpaper works best, I find)
10. Coromega (the best Omega supplement and this brand causes no heartburn)
11. my quasi-conductor’s watch made from a complimentary Michael Kors sample attached to a 70′s key strap.
12. iphone and cover and 5mm kaweco lead holder, both in white and brass, my favorite color combo. I want a white and brass kit. Drawing with the Kaweco is a real pleasure. I upload all my drawings with the iphone, from anywhere.
13. Swiss Villiger Cigar box filled with clay scratchboard papers for drawings. I’d like to store an old-world gambling dice game, or a golf game in here too. Like the old Howzat game. I’m working on it.
14. Davidoff Primeros, the best small cigars I have ever had. There is a relic of St. Therese de Lisieux on top of the box. It’s a piece of her habit. It blesses all my efforts.
15. Micron Pen set (.005, .01, .08 sizes)
16. Muji ink refill in gel blue, wonderful scriber’s tool.
17. Namiki Fountain Pen with red ink cartridges. I wish they’d make a vermillion red ink. I can do all my drawings in red, I love the impact and color.
18. Delta La Dolce Vita Fountain pen with Fine nib. The opposite of the ink refill pen in size and feel.
19. HB lead holder
20. Promecha Super Pencil. A work of art in itself.
21. Macanudo Portofino tube with sandpaper for sharpening leads
22. Derwent Electric Eraser, one of my favorite tools, I cannot live without this when I am drawing.
23. Baby’s Rattle. This is one of the best baby pacifiers I know of. Always handy to quiet the little ones.

A Ticket to Ride the TranSiberian


Image by Viewminder
Cut off from the sea by the suspicious port authorities in Shanghai it seemed that the only way I was going to get out of China was overland. This was my ticket.

In Shanghai I had inquired of every traveler I met about the path ahead of me. I had heard tales of this magnificent and exotic railway adventure before… they called it the greatest railway journey on earth. The longest stretch of steel rail ever layed.

An Australian traveller named Mark told me that he had heard that there was a guy in Beijing who could get me a ticket.

I asked Mark how I could find this guy in Beijing. He said just go there and ask for ‘The Crocodile.’ Just go to a city of some ten million souls and ask for ‘The Crocodile’? It sounded almost insane to me.

Ditching Mark after he made moves on my Chinese girlfriend and ditching my Chinese girlfriend after she got all worked up when a soldier who was following me took a picture of us together on the riverfront… I understood her fear in that time of Tienenmen Square and I knew it was time once again to get moving. It was time to move north to Beijing… the city they once called Peking.

Tsu Tsu Mei was a nice girl. She had told me to call her Eleanor… because that was what she called her ‘American name.’ I couldn’t do it because she just didn’t look like an Eleanor to me… I always called her Tsu Tsu Mei. And I think that she really liked that I did… it would have been easier to call her Eleanor I’m sure… but each time I called her ‘Tsu Tsu Mei’ she gave me this look… it started with a big warm vulnerable smile that made it seem to me that she was melting inside with warm thoughts and shaking knees.

That look always made me want to scoop her up in my arms and give her the same feelings right back. Whenever I said her name and got that look… it just kind of summed everything up right there in that moment. I really liked that. Sometimes I wished that it had gone farther but the way it ended is why I have the memories I do… and I hope she does too… we never hurt each other… never not once… it was the hard and cold government of an opressive authoritarian regime that broke both of our hearts there in Shanghai. It wasn’t either of us… it wasn’t our fault.

I was with Mark the Australian when I met Tsu Tsu Mei… we were tooling around Shanghai and we had just gotten on the bus after a tour of the Shanghai Waterpipe Factory Number Seven where I had just purchased a fine example of a brass opium waterpipe. We had seen the place while riding the bus and jumped off… the factory was really happy to have foreigners tour the place. I couldn’t believe that there were at least six other water bong factories in Shanghai. Somehow we had found the seventh.

As foreigners we were pretty much used to talking in english right in front of people knowing full well that they couldn’t follow our conversation… especially the slang riddled prose we frequently used. When Tsu Tsu Mei got on the bus and stood next to me I turned to Mark and said "man she is the most beautiful Chinese woman I have ever seen."

Before Mark could agree… Tsu Tsu Mei let me know that she appreciated the compliment… she smiled and said "thank you" in perfect english.

Shocked that my subterfuge was exposed at first I was a little embarassed… until Mark took that half of a second to start in on her. No way I thought… I was the one who paid the compliment… I was going to be putting the moves on Tsu Tsu Mei. I’m not sure Australian guys understand the concept of a good ‘wing man’ but Mark sure had some learnin’ to do. He needed to watch the movie ‘Top Gun’ and take some notes.

Tsu Tsu Mei and I arranged to meet later that night in downtown Shanghai and proceeded to become great friends. She even took me to meet her parents… Norman Tsu… the first deaf technical drafting instructor in all of China and his ‘deaf wife Janie.’

Tsu Tsu Mei’s father Norman was sent to the United States to study technical drafting in the fifties. He went to Gaudellet University and he confided in me that he really liked it… that he didn’t want to come back to China… he stopped writing home and corresponding with the government… he wanted to drift away… but they corralled his mother who was a widow by this time… and they made her write Norman a letter that made it really clear that it was in her best interests that Norman return to China. That’s how China got its first deaf technical drafting instructor. Or how they got him back.

Norman always referred to his wife as ‘My deaf wife.’ Both of them were deaf and we passed notes to each other over a marvellous dinner… while Tsu tsu Mei just kept smiling at me and at her parents… unbelievable food Normans deaf wife cooked. It was a feast… and not the Chinese food I was used to… this was exotic and unknown to me. The Tsu’s really went out and they’ve been in my thoughts many times since then.

The Tsu family was really good to me and things were moving right along with Tsu Tsu Mei too until that soldier decided that he’d turn our little hand holding session on the Shanghai riverfrint into a Kodak moment. I had seen that guy following me before… he was the tallest Chinaman I’d ever seen… a full head above the rest of the general population. I found great amusement in shagging him… going into a store and going out the back door. It was really like a game. Still… he always found me… he was on me for days there in Shanghai. And after he took that picture I realized that my company with Tsu Tsu Mei wasn’t looked upon favorably by the authorities. She was terrified of the repurcussions. I knew that was it… I wasn’t going to get her or her family inot any trouble. I was going to get out of Shanghai.

I purchased a train ticket on a sleeper train for the seventeen hour ride from Shanghai to Beijing. How was it that I could go to a city the size of Beijing almost a thousand miles to the north and find this man called ‘The Crocodile’ simply by asking? It seemed completely insane… but such was the world I found myself in this year… for me, 1990 was the year of living insanely.

After seventeen hours of watching China slide by through the window accompanied by the soundtrack of nonstop kung fu videos on the train’s television sets, I stepped off the carriage in Beijing, China’s capital city. Which was a godsend because I could not have taken one more of those videos. The Chinese truly love them… they must be a part of their national identity… the way that the Japanese love Godzilla. Godzilla was a mechanism that helped the Japanese to cope with their loss of World War Two and the painful shock of getting Nuked twice. Even though Godzilla always stomps their cities to pieces they always triumph. It’s like a morality tale with them.

When I was living in Osaka someone who worked in the studio that made the Godzilla movies decided to borrow the costume and wear it to a party where he caused it to be damaged to the tune of a hundred and seventy five thousand dollars. I wish I was at that party. Hanging out with the Nigerians. That would have been epic.

The first european looking guy I saw in Beijing… I stopped him as was my custom in the orient and inquired of the conditions and opportunities there in this new city. Blonde hair in China or Japan had always meant ‘help desk’ to me. We vagabonds and adventurers always stuck together and usually became instant friends as long as there wasn’t a woman involved.

Then I asked him if he had ever heard of ‘The Crocodile.’

He said that he would take me to see him right now. Right then. Right there. Unbelievable. I’m not kidding. No shit. I couldn’t believe it either.

I had found ‘The Crocodile.’

The man walked me to a hotel a few blocks away from the railroad station. It was an old building that looked straight out of the 1920′s, like just about every other building in Beijing. You could see that it was really beautiful at one time… maybe even opulent or exclusive… but it, like anything else that was once beautiful or opulent, it seemed to fall into despair and decay under the custodianship of the communists. That was the way pretty much all of Beijing looked. With brown air and trees and bushes that were different from all those I had even known. I always notice the trees and bushes in a new city. Here on the other side of the world the plant life and the vegetation was odd to me… just unusual enough to stick out in my mind.

The man knocked on the door and we were answered by a nice looking blonde woman on her early twenties. She looked kind of pissed off but invited us in still. My guide just turned around and left with little more than a gesture to the woman. I followed her into the room.

It had become a bit of a self entertainment for me to wonder why the man I was seeking should be called "The Crocodile." It intrigued me from the moment I had heard it and in my mind I came up with all sorts of reasons for the nickname. None of them pleasant.

The room was an illustration in contrasts… inside "The Crocodile" had rented two rooms… he knocked down the wall that had seperated them and completely remolded it. This guy was livin’ cush. He sat on the edge of his bed playing with the tv remote control as if it had befuddled him… I could tell from body language that his girlfriend and he had just been fighting.

"The Crocodile" stood up and turned around to face me… the guy must have been six and a half feet tall… and immediately I could see why they called him "The Crocodile."

He wore these braces on his teeth… the largest mass of metal I’ve ever seen in a persons mouth. Communist braces aren’t very pretty… but these… "The Crocodiles" mouth looked like it had been installed by a blacksmith… an angry, drunken blacksmith. Like hammered bars of hot metal hand forged around each of his teeth.

I had to make myself stop staring as he got right down to business. Croc asked me when I wanted to leave… he said he had one ticket and he wanted a hundred and ten bucks American for it. There’d be no negotiating I could tell that right away. I had a feeling that if I tried that he’d have just relieved me of all my dough right there. Probably my gear too.

We were in a bit of a funny situation for a couple of reasons… I thought the ticket looked fake… it looked worse than some of the permits and passes I’d forged in school. I didn’t have a visa to enter Russia… and I didn’t carry that kind of currency in US dollars. I wasn’t too sure that the Russians would actually be too excited about me coming to their country either. When I expressed this to "The Crocodile" he laughed a powerful and boisterous laugh and told me not to worry about it… he’d just gimme the ticket on good faith… so I could try and get a visa and cash a travellers check or something to come up with the Dollars he wanted. Besides he said "I know where your seat is and when you’ll be leaving and if you fuck me I’ll kill you" after which he laughed another deep laugh and gave me a half hug. "I want my money by next week he said." and walked me to the door where he said goodbye and his girlfriend gave me another dirty look.

That was it. Absolutely fucking unbelievable. I’m in Beijing less than two hours and I found my guy and I got my ticket. Now I just needed a visa from the Soviet Consulate. He’d also tell me there if the ticket was real I figured.

But right now I needed a place to stay. That would have to be my first order of business. The Croc’s hotel seemed a little too luxurious for my budget… I needed something ‘dumpier.’ Something where my kind’d fit in you know?

I walked out of the hotel and on to the street… pausing for a moment to take a breath of the sulfery yellow tinged air and feel the pulse of the street there…a moment to let the vibe of it all sink in. I could have gone left or I could have gone right but it really didn’t matter because I had no idea where I was going anyway. It’s like a rule with me… like walking on the upwind side of the street because that’s where all the paper money blows. Go left.

My friend Joel… the guy who’d saved my ass from the knife weilding Yakuza that pressed certain death into my throat in that bar in Osaka… he told me that he went insane and that he would hear these voices in his head that always said the same thing… "look to the left Joel." If he wasn’t crazy already he said that those voices would do it… he never understood the meaning of it. Stupid voices in your head… they never tell you anything good… like "stay away from that one… she’s trouble." They’re always all cryptic. You gotta try to figure them out and break the code. Joel said the lithium they gave him pretty much shut the voices down. I never had heard voices though. It would probably be fun for a day or two… just to see what they would say. I think if I had voices they would sound like Vincent Price on LSD.

So I went left after I walked out of the Crocodile’s hotel. I usually always go left when I got no idea but this time I was especially glad I did.

I get about a block and right there smack dab… badda bing… I run into this guy I lived with in Osaka Japan… Mike Levine… a Jewish guy from Jersey. He had let me borrow a pair of his shoes because I could find any in my size in Japan. Mike’s got this big smile on his face as he sees me… we hug and slap each others backs and talk about the fight that got me thrown out of the university in Japan that we both went to.

Mike gave me directions to a suitably dumpy hotel and we parted ways.

Walking down the street I saw a couple of American girls… who turned out to be two really granola looking lesbian backpackers from Nebraska.

I stopped them there and asked them where they were staying… they said they had no idea… I invited them to share a hotel room with me if we could find one… plus the thought of girl on girl action sounded like really good fun to me. I felt like I was really going to like Beijing. It seemed like an easy city. Things were looking good.

Was this my lucky day or what?

Shit, I been here for like two hours… I already met the guy I came to meet, had a ticket for the Trans Siberian, hooked up with two lesbians and there we found a three dollar a night hotel. Six yuan a night for each of us. What more greatness could god bestow on me? Another lesbian? A blind supermodel? That would just be asking too much I thought. Lady Luck, I’ve always said, she was indeed a friend of mine.

Never look a gift horse in the mouth they say… so I unpacked my gear in the hotel room… every bit of it… and spread it all around. I always unpack fully so if I get robbed they can’t just take one bag and split… they gotta work for it… then I unscrew all the lightbulbs in the room so they gotta have a flashlight to do it well… and then I make some loud noise making booby trap… like a pyramid of empty beer cans behind the door… then they gotta have nerves of steel to finish the job. Never got robbed once. Never. I have come home more than a few times affected by some intoxicant or another and fallen vicim to my own booby traps though. It always scared the beejesus out of me.

The Nebraska lesbians unpacked too.

Time to get out of here… It was time to go have a look at Beijing.

I left the hotel in a hurry and jumped on the first bus I saw… it didn’t matter where the bus was going…I didn’t care… I was sure that I hadn’t been there anyway. That’s the great thing about exploring like that. A new city… just go anywhere. It’s all new.

Sitting on the bus I was of course the only westerner riding it. The Chinese weren’t as polite as the Japanese and they would just stare at you forever… sometimes with mouth agape even… and I found myself very much the center of attention… the center of attention was something I really didn’t want to be. I kinda wanted to blend in really. That was going to be tough.

I started having what could only be described as auditory hallucinations on that bus… that happened alot to me in China… but right there it was bad… the cacaphony of Chinese voices started to filter itself out in my hyperactive mind and become english… I could understand things sometimes… I was certain that people were commenting on how intoxicated I was… they all knew it… they were all talking about me… looking at me… ‘Is that American guy drunk out of his gourd or what?’ I had to get off that bus. The sweat was pouring from my pores. It was getting to be more than uncomfortable… it was unbearable.

The next stop was my stop no matter where it might be… soon as it stopped I jumped off that bus so fast… I didn’t even have a clue as to where I was… and I didn’t care. Away from that hash house hotel and off of that bus…I just wanted my own little piece of contraband free real estate where I could sit and watch China go by and make amusing comments in my head to entertain myself.

This was my stop.

Before me was layed an enormous plaza… I had never seen such a large paved public space. It was gigantic enough it looked like you could lay down and land a 747 in it if you went from one corner to the next. It was so big and vast that the smog of Beijing obscured the other side of it from me. I didn’t know what this place was, but it made me feel realy small… insignificant actually… which was precisely how I wanted to feel.

I stood at Tienenmen Square.

This was the old Beijing… the one that used to be before the extremely systematic exploitation of cheap labor turned the place into a giant pachinko parlor… this was the dirty, dusty and gritty beijing where products were pulled around on wagons by teams of horses who shit big piles in the streets that you’d go straight over the handlebars of your bicycle if you didn’t look where you were going. I’d seen it.

This was the Beijing where the streets seemed impossibly large considering no one really owned a car… the Beijing where the old people all wore those navy blue or black or gray kung fu outfits and walked around stooping with their hands clasped behind their backs as if some ultimate power had ordered them to for all time.

This was the square in Beijing where less than a year had passed since thousands of students took a chance to try and change their world… this was the Beijing where tanks had rolled over them without mercy and their bodies were torn apart by the callousness of lead flying around at ballisticly high speeds and cruel random trajectories. This was the Beijing where their blood ran like rivers down the curbs and into the sewers where like the extinguishing of their tender lives for naught all was soon forgotten by a world more infatuated with its demand for cheap consumer electronics in attractive clamshell packaging.

The one year anniversary of the slaughter was approaching and here as if by accident I find myself in the place where history was made and so conveniently forgotten.

Here and there I could still see bullet scars, burns and other marks that told the tale of a failed movement killed in a single night of murderous debauchery.

It was eerie in Beijing. I couldn’t put my finger on it. Was it just the intoxicant’s influence? I couldn’t place it until I found a nice grassy place to sit down and let everything stabilize. Let my altered mind stop spinning.

The young people were all gone.

The government had sent what looked like the entire youth of the capitol city to ‘summer camp,’ where they’d sing patriotic songs and watch lots of motivational films and learn the error of their ways. It was re-education for the entire young population… there was almost no one walking around that city bettween the age of fourteen and twenty one. It was spooky… strange mojo in a strange land. Like some kind of Twilight Zone episode.

Everybody’s seen the picture of ‘Tank Man,’ that guy whose name the world doesn’t know… the one who was walking home from the grocery store with a couple of plastic bags in his hands… the guy who became a lonely human roadblock for a column of tanks… I know I could never forget that guy… he had balls the size of watermelons that one. I woudda love to have bought that guy a drink or eight.

I was walking down that street and a momentary sense of deja vu made me stop… It felt like I’d been there before… it didn’t take too long for the reality to hit me… I was standing in that spot. In the Tank Man’s spot. The premonition came from looking at that photograph.

There was a pay phone there… on the side of the street… you can see it in the Tank Man picture… I thought my parents might like to know where in the world I was so I tried to call them from it without luck. Maybe they’d think it was cool that I was calling them from there I thought.

I wanted to feel the scene out… I wanted to let it all sink in a little bit so I sat down and I had a look around. It all began to unfold in my mind… the direction the tanks came from… the sounds they’d make… their squeaking tracks rolling on the asphalt echoing in the canyon of concrete buildings… I could see the crosswalk he was walking across when it happened.

I stood up, still painting the scene on the canvas of my mind with the brushes of my imagination and I walked towards the crosswalk… just as he did that remarkable day.

Man… sometimes even I have a hard time putting things into words… sometimes feelings, emotions and perceptions are just too powerful and swift to get a grasp on.

Surveying the scene where this historic collision happened from the street… it was so much different than the picture we all know… that was shot from high above… it’s got a whole different tone than the lonliness and isolation that the street level offered. Just like in the square where I had felt so small… even the street there was massive in width… one of those subcompact cars flying through the smog could have crushed me like a bug. The thought of standing my ground in front of a column of many ton armored tanks with their diesel engines shaking and belching thick black smoke and rumbling in anger… I’ll tell you this… with the greatest respect that I can muster… that guy… at that moment… he took on the entire world. He was a bad ass motherfucker who said ‘hey… I don’t like what’s going down here.’ and he backed it up with his hundred and fifty pound body alone in the streets. He never even put those grocery bags down. But for a moment, that man stopped the world. He stood his ground. He stood our ground. He stood for everyman that day.

I didn’t.

I didn’t even chance stopping where he did. I didn’t want to stop a bus.

When I got across the street I walked back towards Tienenmen Square wondering what happened to the guy.

These thoughts were crisply punctuated when I found the remains of a completely flattened bicycle. It had been run over by something pretty heavy because it was as flat as a bicycle could conceivably become. It even had a curve to it… a lot of parts were gone but the frame, the handlebars, even the rims were crushed flat. I picked it up, still thinking about Tank Man and I realized what it meant.

Something inside me wanted to take it home… to show my people… people born and raised with a freedom fought for by others… I wanted to show them what we pretty much let happen here… the great crime that we ignored. It was a strong symbol to me at least of an oppresive government that lost it’s temper on it’s own people.

I’d never get that flattened bicycle home, but I carried stashed inside the tubes of my backpack messages that people had asked me to carry out of the country to a place where mistakenly so they thought good and decent people might give two shits about the treachery bestowed upon them in their quest for what we have but could really care less about. A freedom so strong… a freedom so deep that it was a part of me wether I was conscious about it or not… a freedom that formed the person I was and carried me on a long and mostly accidental journey to a place where youth was cut short for having the audacity and lack of patience to demand a more tolerant society where people would count for just a little more than cheap labor.

I promised myself I’d remember what happened to them. I promised myself that on June 4th, 1990 that I’d say a prayer there in Tienenmen Square. I’d recognize their martyrdom to the cause of freedom and I’d pay my respects on the anniversary of the barbarism of their all powerful and vicious central authority.

When that morning came with its sultry brownish orange sunrise, three hundred and sixty five days after the blood letting, when the flag of a nation was raised over it’s most proud square… I was the only person that wasn’t Chinese standing there as a witness to at least offer the the quiet contempt of my heart and the objection of my soul as a counterbalance to the disgrace of the murder of these children.

There were no television cameras or satellite trucks… no journalists fixing their hair or taking notes on those long pads that they carry. Nothing.

I carried no sign or banner… I spoke no message of objection. I sought to instigate nothing.

I stood there in Tienenmen Square as a witness.

A witness to what the rest of the free world was so selfishly quick to forget.

Two days later I’d board a train that I’d get off of in another world… where a wall that represented hate and anger and mistrust would be falling, hacked to pieces bit by bit by a people celebrating a new freedom and unity.

Way to the future right now


Image by aurelio.asiain
Much more better at a close approach: the unfinished National Grand Theater of China, in Beijing, next to the Great Hall of the People. With 150,000 square meters floor area, it was supposed to be finished and ready to have performances by 2005, but the construction is still going on. (This is part of a growing set, try running the slideshow first.)

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china hight quality Precision CNC China Machining sales

china hight quality Precision CNC China Machining sales | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

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presentation of Vincent Parts Inc, one of the top manufacturer in china, produce kinds of metal parts,cnc China machining parts,stamping parts,sheet metal fabricat…

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Most popular China Machined Components Manufacturers auctions

Some recent China machined components manufacturers auctions on eBay:

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Adjustments' handle of metal milling machine. Free HD video footage

Adjustments' handle of metal milling machine. Free HD video footage | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

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Adjustments’ handle of metal milling machine. Free HD video footage


Image by Unripe Content
Adjustments’ handle of metal milling machine in a use of a worker. He is rotating it forward and backward doing fine tuning in his task.

DOWNLOAD LINK: unripecontent.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/adjustments-handle…

Dimensions: 1920 x 1080
Video codec: H.264
Audio codec: AAC
Color profile: HD (1-1-1)
Duration: 00:09
FPS: 25
Data rate: 20.45 Mbit/s

vertical milling machine – cylinder liner machining


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vertical cnc machining on a cylinder liner at www.heartlandmachining.com

Bridgeport China Milling China Machine


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Nice Rapid Prototype China photos

Nice Rapid Prototype China photos | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: P-40 Warhawk, SR-71 Blackbird, Naval Aircraft Factory N3N seaplane, Space Shuttle Enterprise


Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Curtiss P-40E Warhawk (Kittyhawk IA):

Whether known as the Warhawk, Tomahawk, or Kittyhawk, the Curtiss P-40 proved to be a successful, versatile fighter during the first half of World War II. The shark-mouthed Tomahawks that Gen. Claire Chennault’s "Flying Tigers" flew in China against the Japanese remain among the most popular airplanes of the war. P-40E pilot Lt. Boyd D. Wagner became the first American ace of World War II when he shot down six Japanese aircraft in the Philippines in mid-December 1941.

Curtiss-Wright built this airplane as Model 87-A3 and delivered it to Canada as a Kittyhawk I in 1941. It served until 1946 in No. 111 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. U.S. Air Force personnel at Andrews Air Force Base restored it in 1975 to represent an aircraft of the 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force.

Donated by the Exchange Club in Memory of Kellis Forbes.

Manufacturer:
Curtiss Aircraft Company

Date:
1939

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 330 x 970cm, 2686kg, 1140cm (10ft 9 15/16in. x 31ft 9 7/8in., 5921.6lb., 37ft 4 13/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal, semi-monocoque

Physical Description:
Single engine, single seat, fighter aircraft.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Naval Aircraft Factory N3N:

In 1934 the Naval Aircraft Factory in Philadelphia was tasked to manufacture a new primary trainer for the U.S. Navy. Following successful tests, this little biplane trainer was built in both land and seaplane versions. The Navy initially ordered 179 N3N-1 models, and the factory began producing more than 800 N3N-3 models in 1938. U.S. Navy primary flight training schools used N3Ns extensively throughout World War II. A few of the seaplane version were retained for primary training at the U.S. Naval Academy. In 1961 they became the last biplanes retired from U.S. military service.

This N3N-3 was transferred from Cherry Point to Annapolis in 1946, where it served as a seaplane trainer. It was restored and displayed at the Naval Academy Museum before being transferred here.

Transferred from the United States Navy

Manufacturer:
Naval Aircraft Factory

Date:
1941

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 10ft 9 15/16in. x 25ft 7 1/16in. x 34ft 1 7/16in., 2090lb. (330 x 780 x 1040cm, 948kg)

Materials:
bolted steel-tube fuselage construction with removable side panels wings, also constructed internally of all metal, covered with fabric like the fuselage and tail.

Physical Description:
Bright yellow bi-plane, hand crank start. Cockpit instrumentation consists of an altimeter, tachometer, airspeed indicator, compass, turn and bank indicator, and a combination fuel and oil temperature and pressure gauge, floats.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 57 ft. tall x 122 ft. long x 78 ft. wing span, 150,000 lb.
(1737.36 x 3718.57 x 2377.44cm, 68039.6kg)

Materials:
Aluminum airframe and body with some fiberglass features; payload bay doors are graphite epoxy composite; thermal tiles are simulated (polyurethane foam) except for test samples of actual tiles and thermal blankets.

The first Space Shuttle orbiter, "Enterprise," is a full-scale test vehicle used for flights in the atmosphere and tests on the ground; it is not equipped for spaceflight. Although the airframe and flight control elements are like those of the Shuttles flown in space, this vehicle has no propulsion system and only simulated thermal tiles because these features were not needed for atmospheric and ground tests. "Enterprise" was rolled out at Rockwell International’s assembly facility in Palmdale, California, in 1976. In 1977, it entered service for a nine-month-long approach-and-landing test flight program. Thereafter it was used for vibration tests and fit checks at NASA centers, and it also appeared in the 1983 Paris Air Show and the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans. In 1985, NASA transferred "Enterprise" to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Transferred from National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: SR-71 Blackbird (tail view)


Image by Chris Devers
See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

Long Description:
No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71 Blackbird. It is the fastest aircraft propelled by air-breathing engines. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War. The airplane was conceived when tensions with communist Eastern Europe reached levels approaching a full-blown crisis in the mid-1950s. U.S. military commanders desperately needed accurate assessments of Soviet worldwide military deployments, particularly near the Iron Curtain. Lockheed Aircraft Corporation’s subsonic U-2 (see NASM collection) reconnaissance aircraft was an able platform but the U. S. Air Force recognized that this relatively slow aircraft was already vulnerable to Soviet interceptors. They also understood that the rapid development of surface-to-air missile systems could put U-2 pilots at grave risk. The danger proved reality when a U-2 was shot down by a surface to air missile over the Soviet Union in 1960.

Lockheed’s first proposal for a new high speed, high altitude, reconnaissance aircraft, to be capable of avoiding interceptors and missiles, centered on a design propelled by liquid hydrogen. This proved to be impracticable because of considerable fuel consumption. Lockheed then reconfigured the design for conventional fuels. This was feasible and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), already flying the Lockheed U-2, issued a production contract for an aircraft designated the A-12. Lockheed’s clandestine ‘Skunk Works’ division (headed by the gifted design engineer Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson) designed the A-12 to cruise at Mach 3.2 and fly well above 18,288 m (60,000 feet). To meet these challenging requirements, Lockheed engineers overcame many daunting technical challenges. Flying more than three times the speed of sound generates 316° C (600° F) temperatures on external aircraft surfaces, which are enough to melt conventional aluminum airframes. The design team chose to make the jet’s external skin of titanium alloy to which shielded the internal aluminum airframe. Two conventional, but very powerful, afterburning turbine engines propelled this remarkable aircraft. These power plants had to operate across a huge speed envelope in flight, from a takeoff speed of 334 kph (207 mph) to more than 3,540 kph (2,200 mph). To prevent supersonic shock waves from moving inside the engine intake causing flameouts, Johnson’s team had to design a complex air intake and bypass system for the engines.

Skunk Works engineers also optimized the A-12 cross-section design to exhibit a low radar profile. Lockheed hoped to achieve this by carefully shaping the airframe to reflect as little transmitted radar energy (radio waves) as possible, and by application of special paint designed to absorb, rather than reflect, those waves. This treatment became one of the first applications of stealth technology, but it never completely met the design goals.

Test pilot Lou Schalk flew the single-seat A-12 on April 24, 1962, after he became airborne accidentally during high-speed taxi trials. The airplane showed great promise but it needed considerable technical refinement before the CIA could fly the first operational sortie on May 31, 1967 – a surveillance flight over North Vietnam. A-12s, flown by CIA pilots, operated as part of the Air Force’s 1129th Special Activities Squadron under the "Oxcart" program. While Lockheed continued to refine the A-12, the U. S. Air Force ordered an interceptor version of the aircraft designated the YF-12A. The Skunk Works, however, proposed a "specific mission" version configured to conduct post-nuclear strike reconnaissance. This system evolved into the USAF’s familiar SR-71.

Lockheed built fifteen A-12s, including a special two-seat trainer version. Two A-12s were modified to carry a special reconnaissance drone, designated D-21. The modified A-12s were redesignated M-21s. These were designed to take off with the D-21 drone, powered by a Marquart ramjet engine mounted on a pylon between the rudders. The M-21 then hauled the drone aloft and launched it at speeds high enough to ignite the drone’s ramjet motor. Lockheed also built three YF-12As but this type never went into production. Two of the YF-12As crashed during testing. Only one survives and is on display at the USAF Museum in Dayton, Ohio. The aft section of one of the "written off" YF-12As which was later used along with an SR-71A static test airframe to manufacture the sole SR-71C trainer. One SR-71 was lent to NASA and designated YF-12C. Including the SR-71C and two SR-71B pilot trainers, Lockheed constructed thirty-two Blackbirds. The first SR-71 flew on December 22, 1964. Because of extreme operational costs, military strategists decided that the more capable USAF SR-71s should replace the CIA’s A-12s. These were retired in 1968 after only one year of operational missions, mostly over southeast Asia. The Air Force’s 1st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (part of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing) took over the missions, flying the SR-71 beginning in the spring of 1968.

After the Air Force began to operate the SR-71, it acquired the official name Blackbird– for the special black paint that covered the airplane. This paint was formulated to absorb radar signals, to radiate some of the tremendous airframe heat generated by air friction, and to camouflage the aircraft against the dark sky at high altitudes.

Experience gained from the A-12 program convinced the Air Force that flying the SR-71 safely required two crew members, a pilot and a Reconnaissance Systems Officer (RSO). The RSO operated with the wide array of monitoring and defensive systems installed on the airplane. This equipment included a sophisticated Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) system that could jam most acquisition and targeting radar. In addition to an array of advanced, high-resolution cameras, the aircraft could also carry equipment designed to record the strength, frequency, and wavelength of signals emitted by communications and sensor devices such as radar. The SR-71 was designed to fly deep into hostile territory, avoiding interception with its tremendous speed and high altitude. It could operate safely at a maximum speed of Mach 3.3 at an altitude more than sixteen miles, or 25,908 m (85,000 ft), above the earth. The crew had to wear pressure suits similar to those worn by astronauts. These suits were required to protect the crew in the event of sudden cabin pressure loss while at operating altitudes.

To climb and cruise at supersonic speeds, the Blackbird’s Pratt & Whitney J-58 engines were designed to operate continuously in afterburner. While this would appear to dictate high fuel flows, the Blackbird actually achieved its best "gas mileage," in terms of air nautical miles per pound of fuel burned, during the Mach 3+ cruise. A typical Blackbird reconnaissance flight might require several aerial refueling operations from an airborne tanker. Each time the SR-71 refueled, the crew had to descend to the tanker’s altitude, usually about 6,000 m to 9,000 m (20,000 to 30,000 ft), and slow the airplane to subsonic speeds. As velocity decreased, so did frictional heat. This cooling effect caused the aircraft’s skin panels to shrink considerably, and those covering the fuel tanks contracted so much that fuel leaked, forming a distinctive vapor trail as the tanker topped off the Blackbird. As soon as the tanks were filled, the jet’s crew disconnected from the tanker, relit the afterburners, and again climbed to high altitude.

Air Force pilots flew the SR-71 from Kadena AB, Japan, throughout its operational career but other bases hosted Blackbird operations, too. The 9th SRW occasionally deployed from Beale AFB, California, to other locations to carryout operational missions. Cuban missions were flown directly from Beale. The SR-71 did not begin to operate in Europe until 1974, and then only temporarily. In 1982, when the U.S. Air Force based two aircraft at Royal Air Force Base Mildenhall to fly monitoring mission in Eastern Europe.

When the SR-71 became operational, orbiting reconnaissance satellites had already replaced manned aircraft to gather intelligence from sites deep within Soviet territory. Satellites could not cover every geopolitical hotspot so the Blackbird remained a vital tool for global intelligence gathering. On many occasions, pilots and RSOs flying the SR-71 provided information that proved vital in formulating successful U. S. foreign policy. Blackbird crews provided important intelligence about the 1973 Yom Kippur War, the Israeli invasion of Lebanon and its aftermath, and pre- and post-strike imagery of the 1986 raid conducted by American air forces on Libya. In 1987, Kadena-based SR-71 crews flew a number of missions over the Persian Gulf, revealing Iranian Silkworm missile batteries that threatened commercial shipping and American escort vessels.

As the performance of space-based surveillance systems grew, along with the effectiveness of ground-based air defense networks, the Air Force started to lose enthusiasm for the expensive program and the 9th SRW ceased SR-71 operations in January 1990. Despite protests by military leaders, Congress revived the program in 1995. Continued wrangling over operating budgets, however, soon led to final termination. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration retained two SR-71As and the one SR-71B for high-speed research projects and flew these airplanes until 1999.

On March 6, 1990, the service career of one Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird ended with a record-setting flight. This special airplane bore Air Force serial number 64-17972. Lt. Col. Ed Yeilding and his RSO, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Vida, flew this aircraft from Los Angeles to Washington D.C. in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging a speed of 3,418 kph (2,124 mph). At the conclusion of the flight, ’972 landed at Dulles International Airport and taxied into the custody of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. At that time, Lt. Col. Vida had logged 1,392.7 hours of flight time in Blackbirds, more than that of any other crewman.

This particular SR-71 was also flown by Tom Alison, a former National Air and Space Museum’s Chief of Collections Management. Flying with Detachment 1 at Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa, Alison logged more than a dozen ’972 operational sorties. The aircraft spent twenty-four years in active Air Force service and accrued a total of 2,801.1 hours of flight time.

Wingspan: 55’7"
Length: 107’5"
Height: 18’6"
Weight: 170,000 Lbs

Reference and Further Reading:

Crickmore, Paul F. Lockheed SR-71: The Secret Missions Exposed. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1996.

Francillon, Rene J. Lockheed Aircraft Since 1913. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1987.

Johnson, Clarence L. Kelly: More Than My Share of It All. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1985.

Miller, Jay. Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works. Leicester, U.K.: Midland Counties Publishing Ltd., 1995.

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird curatorial file, Aeronautics Division, National Air and Space Museum.

DAD, 11-11-01

Pump up the 3d printer


Image by · · · — — — · · ·
MakerBot with ABS? feed.

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Lastest China Milling And China Machining auctions

milling and machining eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

MaxNC-10 3-axis Engraving and Milling machine, Super Condition!

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Milling Keyways

Milling Keyways | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Just a pretty simple China milling job that I had to do, China milling keyways on each end of a shaft.

A simple approach to China milling a square or rectangular pocket on the vertical China milling machine. Check out MetalworkingFun.com for more similar instructional vid…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Cool China Machining Forged Parts images

Cool China Machining Forged Parts images | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Some cool machining forged parts images:

Hammering out a draw bar on the steam drop hammer in the blacksmith shop, Santa Fe R.R. shops, Albuquerque, N[ew] Mex[ico) (LOC)


Image by The Library of Congress
Delano, Jack,, photographer.

Hammering out a draw bar on the steam drop hammer in the blacksmith shop, Santa Fe R.R. shops, Albuquerque, N[ew] Mex[ico)

1943 March

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad
World War, 1939-1945
Railroad shops & yards
Railroad construction & maintenance
Blacksmithing
United States--New Mexico--Albuquerque

Format: Transparencies--Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Collection 12002-7 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a34730

Call Number: LC-USW36-683

Number 2 ... History made as Iran agrees with world powers to freeze nuclear program (24 November 2013) -- The gang's all here ...item 2b.. The Twilight Zone - To Serve Man ...


Image by marsmet549
The deal also calls for 'unprecedented transparency and intrusive monitoring of Iran’s nuclear program,' according to a White House statement.

This transparency includes allowing International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors access to all previously disputed facilities and the providing of all previously requested information about their operation.

'These are substantial limitations which will help prevent Iran from building a nuclear weapon,' said the President.
.

........*****All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ........
.

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. -- Edmund Burke
.
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..........................................................................................................................................................................
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.....item 1)..... History made as Iran agrees with world powers to freeze nuclear program for six months ..

... Mail Online - Daily Mail ... www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ ...

... Early details are scarce, but early reports have Iran agreeing to stop enriching uranium for six months in exchange for limited lifting of sanctions
... Secretary of State John Kerry joined the foreign ministers of China, Russia, Great Britain, France and Germany at negotiating table Saturday
... President Barack Obama called it 'the most significant and tangible progress' since he took office

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS and RYAN GORMAN
PUBLISHED: 21:54 EST, 23 November 2013 | UPDATED: 01:45 EST, 24 November 2013

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2512628/History-Iran-agr...

Iran has agreed with major global powers to temporarily suspend its controversial nuclear program in exchange for an easing of economic sanctions.

The historic agreement calls for Tehran to suspend uranium enrichment for weapons and take several other steps to prove it is working towards a more permanent solution. In exchange, relief from some economic sanctions will be provided.

'The first step that we have taken today marks the most significant and tangible progress that we have made with Iran since I took office,' President Barack Obama said in Saturday night remarks from the White House.

The still-to-be signed deal brings a partial end to decades of sanctions imposed against a country infamously deemed a member of 'the axis of evil' by former President George W Bush.

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO
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img code photo ... Another historic late night weekend announcement

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B94...

Another historic late night weekend announcement: US President Barack Obama makes a statement announcing an interim agreement on Iranian nuclear power that was reached in negotiations between Iran and six world powers

EPA

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img code photo ... The gang's all here

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B7A...

The gang's all here: World leaders including John Kerry (third from right) and Irainain Foreign Minister Javid Zarif (center left) during deal's announcement from Geneva

Reuters

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img code photo ... History has been made

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B86...

History has been made: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov next to French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (L-R)

Reuters

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In addition to suspending further uranium enrichment, the country has also agreed to neutralize it's stockpile of near 20 per cent uranium, US officials said.

The regime will not install any new centrifuges, disable roughly half of the country's centrifuge capabilities, and limit production of machines to that only needed to replace damaged ones needed to continue a peaceful program aimed at producing nuclear power, said US officials.

These actions include centrifuges at Natanz and Arak.

'While today's announcement is just a first step, it achieves a great deal,' said Mr Obama.

The deal also calls for 'unprecedented transparency and intrusive monitoring of Iran’s nuclear program,' according to a White House statement.

This transparency includes allowing International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors access to all previously disputed facilities and the providing of all previously requested information about their operation.

'These are substantial limitations which will help prevent Iran from building a nuclear weapon,' said the President.
.
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img code photo ... Some sanctions will be eased

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B7E...

Some sanctions will be eased: The deal allows for the relaxing of some sanctions, but only if Iran continues to abide by the agreement

AP

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img code photo ... Major progress

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B80...

Major progress: President Barack Obama speaks Saturday in the State Dining Room at the White House

AP

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President Obama Makes a Statement on Iran

video: 6:55 minutes

YouTube

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There will be a multi-step verification process to ensure Iran complies with the agreement.

Iran agreed to these steps in exchange for a moderate relief from economic sanctions that have significantly derailed the country's economy over the past several years.

'The United States and our friends and allies have agreed to provide Iran modest relief, while continuing to apply our toughest sanctions,' President Obama added.

The relief includes suspending embargoes against gold and precious medals, Iran's auto industry and petrochemical exports, which US officials said will give the country about .5billion in revenue.

Additonally, further planned sanctions against Iranian oil will be put on hold and 0million in governmental tuition assistance will be made available from previously restricted accounts for use by Iranian students in other countries.

The total relief will total about billion, according to officials, but the country's estimated 0billion in foreign exchange holdings will remain restricted.
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img code photo ... Iranmust prove itself

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199BCB...

Iranmust prove itself: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry gestures as he speaks to the media about the deal that has been reached

AP

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img code photo ... Celebration

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B82...

Celebration: (L to R) EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov

AFP / Getty Images

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img code photo ... An amazing announcement

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B92...

An amazing announcement: Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (L) reacts next to EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton (C) as US Secretary of State John Kerry (2nd R) embraces French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius

AFP / Getty Images

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The President added that this development is proof that diplomacy can work, and that the US is committed to this course of action.

Speaking from Geneva, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the deal is 'only the first step,' but 'a critical first step.'

He also called the deal 'fail safe' and said that the President took great risks in coming to the agreement.

Both the President and Mr Kerry were quick to note that no one will take Iran's words at face value and that the deal alone is just the beginning, the onus is now on the country to follow up.

'This would provide Iran with a dignified path to forge a new beginning with the wider world based on mutual respect,' Mr Obama said. 'But if Iran refuses, it will face growing pressure and isolation.'

The world's most powerful countries brought their biggest diplomatic guns, with Mr Kerry flying in Saturday as it looked like an agreement was increasingly likely.
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img code photo ... Let's make a deal

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B81...

Let's make a deal: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) shakes hands with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif after the announcement

Reuters

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img code photo ... All smiles

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B87...

All smiles: Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (L) and French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (R) enjoy the moment

AFP / Getty Images

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The country has reportedly agreed to stop enriching uranium for the next six months while the details of a more permanent agreement are hammered out.

Mr Kerry joined the foreign ministers of China, Russia, Britain, France and Germany in Geneva, Switzerland, and his inclusion was seen as a sign a deal was imminent.

Hassan Rouhani, Iran's newly-elected moderate President, had previously spoke of hoping to bring to an end the Western sanctions that have crippled his country's economy

The agreement is a 'first-step' deal, according to NBC News.

It is binding for six months, but officials are hopeful that economic incentives will entice the previously

Until the announcement, which came early Sunday morning Geneva time, it was unclear whether the current round of negotiations would produce even a tentative agreement.

Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague spoke previously of 'very difficult negotiations,' saying 'narrow gaps' remain on the same issues that blocked agreement at the last round earlier this month.

'We're not here because things are necessarily finished,' Hague told reporters. 'We're here because they're difficult, and they remain difficult.'

Kerry and his counterparts from Russia, Britain, France, China and Germany headed for Geneva after diplomats said Friday that Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and top European Union diplomat Catherine Ashton had made progress on a key sticking point - Iran's claim to a right to produce nuclear fuel through uranium enrichment.
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img code photo ... A sense of relief

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/24/article-2512628-199B8A...

A sense of relief: EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton (2nd L) is embraced by US Secretary of State John Kerry

AFP / Getty Images

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.

News of the agreement was immediately followed by reports that the US and Iran held secret talks regarding the country's nuclear program since Mr Rouhani was elected President in June.

The secret meetings were held in Oman and other secret locations and kept secret from all US allies, including Israel.

The talks were held in Oman after Sultan Qaboos volunteered to mediate between the two nations, who have not had formal diplomatic relations since 1979.

Several talks were held prior to August, but little progress was made before then. The early meetings have been characterized as exploratory and mainly to see if there was a basis for negotiation.

Details were not previously released but it appeared the two sides were trying to reconcile Iran's insistence that it has a right to enrich for peaceful purposes while assuaging fears that Tehran was secretly trying to build a bomb, a charge the Iranians deny.

As the talks entered an intensive phase, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said the negotiations had reached 'the final moment,' according to China's Xinhua news agency.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius told reporters he wanted 'a deal - but a solid deal - and I am here to work toward that end.'

France's concern that the negotiators were rushing into a flawed deal with Iran helped delay an agreement during a session nearly two weeks ago.

Other obstacles include Iran's plutonium reactor under construction in Arak as well as a formula for providing limited sanctions relief without weakening international leverage against Iran.
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img code photo ... Kerry met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/23/article-2512392-19980D...

Kerry met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov as part of the negotiations

AP

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Zarif appeared to allude to the toughening of demands after France's intervention. Iran's Mehr news agency quoted him as saying that back then, 'the two sides had agreement on issues but now it has reached a stage that there are various viewpoints and it is somehow difficult.'

Enrichment is a hot-button issue because it can be used both to make reactor fuel and to make nuclear weapons. Iran argues it is enriching only for power, and scientific and medical purposes, and says it has no interest in nuclear arms.

Washington and its allies point to Tehran's earlier efforts to hide enrichment and allege it worked on developing such weapons.

Iran has insisted on that right throughout almost a decade of mostly fruitless negotiations. But Zarif last weekend indicated that Iran is ready to sign a deal that does not expressly state that claim.

Iranian hard-liners have been suspicious of talk of nuclear compromise since moderate President Hassan Rouhani took office in September, fearing his team will give not get enough in terms of sanctions relief over the six-months of any first-stage agreement.
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img code photo ... Kerry was greeted by Ambassador Alexandre Fasel

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/11/23/article-2512392-199884...

Kerry was greeted by Ambassador Alexandre Fasel of the Swiss Mission in Geneva (2-R), Ambassador Jurg Lauber of the Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2-L), and US Charge d'Affaires Peter Mulrean (L)

EPA

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Several U.S. senators - both Democrat and Republican - previously voiced displeasure with the parameters of the potential agreement, arguing that the U.S. and its partners are offering too much for something short of a full freeze on uranium enrichment.

On Wednesday, Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said his country would never compromise on 'red lines.' Since then Tehran had even publicly reverted to its original stance - that the six powers must recognize uranium enrichment as Iran's right, despite strong opposition by Israel and within the U.S. Congress.

Still, comments from Iranian officials in Geneva indicated that reverting to tough talk on enrichment may have at least partially been meant for home consumption.

In Geneva, a senior Iranian negotiator said the Iranian claim to the right to enrich did not need to be explicitly recognized in any initial deal, despite Khamenei's comment, adding that the supreme leader was not planning to intervene in the talks. He did suggest, however, that language on that point remained difficult and that there were other differences.
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.....item 2a).... The Kanamits, nine-foot tall aliens, arrive on Earth with one lofty goal: To Serve Man. They end war, they end famine. They make the military wonder: what's the catch?
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"To Serve Man" is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone.

The story is based on the short story "To Serve Man," written by Damon Knight.[1] The title is a play on the verb to serve, which has the dual meanings of "to assist" and "to provide as a meal." The episode is one of the few instances in the series wherein the actor breaks the fourth wall and addresses the viewing audience at the episode’s end.

Synopsis

As the episode opens, Michael Chambers is seen lying uncomfortably on a cot in a spartan interior. An unseen voice implores him to eat. He refuses. He asks what time it is on Earth, and begins to tell the story of how he came to be here (aboard a spaceship) in flashback:

The Kanamits, a race of nine-foot-tall aliens, land on Earth. One of them addresses the United Nations, vowing that his race’s motive in coming to Earth is solely to be helpful to humanity. Initially wary of the intentions of an alien race who came "quite uninvited," even skeptical international leaders begin to be persuaded of the aliens’ benevolence when the Kanamits share their advanced technology, quickly putting an end to many of Earth’s greatest woes, including hunger; energy becomes very cheap; nuclear weapons are rendered harmless. The aliens even morph deserts into big, blooming fields. Trust in the Kanamits seems to be justified when Patty, one of a staff of US government cryptographers led by Mr. Chambers, cracks the title of a Kanamit book the spokesman left behind at the UN. Its title, she reveals, is To Serve Man.

Soon, humans are volunteering for trips to the Kanamits’ home planet, which is portrayed as a paradise. With the Cold War ended, the code-breaking staff has no real work to do, but Patty is still trying to work out the meaning of the text of To Serve Man.

The day arrives for Mr. Chambers’s excursion to the Kanamits’ planet. Just as he mounts the spaceship’s boarding stairs, his staffer Patty appears. He waves to her, smiling, but she runs toward him in great agitation–and is held back by a Kanamit guard. "Mr. Chambers," Patty cries, "don’t get on that ship! The rest of the book To Serve Man, it’s… it’s a cookbook!" Chambers tries to run back down the spaceship’s stairs, but a Kanamit wrestles him into the ship, and it immediately takes off for the aliens’ home planet.

So we again see Mr. Chambers aboard the Kanamit spaceship, now saying to the audience, "How about you? You still on Earth, or on the ship with me? Really doesn’t make very much difference, because sooner or later, we’ll all of us be on the menu…all of us." The episode closes as he gives in and breaks his hunger strike; as Chambers tears at his food, Rod Serling provides a darkly humorous coda in voice-over, noting man’s devolution from "dust to dessert" and from ruler of a planet to "an ingredient in someone’s soup."
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Episode no. Season 3
Episode 89
Directed by Richard L. Bare
Written by Rod Serling (Based on the story To Serve Man by Damon Knight. First published in the November 1950 issue of Galaxy.)
Featured music Stock – taken almost exclusively from Jerry Goldsmith’s TZ episode scores for "Back There" and "The Invaders"
Production code 4807
Original air date March 2, 1962

Guest stars

Lloyd Bochner: Chambers
Richard Kiel: Kanamit
Susan Cummings: Patty
Joseph Ruskin: Kanamit Voice (uncredited)
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…..item 2b)…. youtube video … The Twilight Zone S03 E24 To Serve Man … 23:48 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fx4oWVw0lI4

nothingbutclassics3

Published on Sep 8, 2013
No description available.

Category
People & Blogs

License
Standard YouTube License
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Most popular China Machine Shop Quote auctions

Machine Shop Quote on eBay:

Vintage Metalworking Grinding Quote Sheet Machine Shop Supplies Somerset Tool Co $5.00
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Machine Shop

Machine Shop | Precision Machining China | Scoop.it

Some cool cnc machine shop images:

Machine Shop


Image by lisbokt
We got a new donation over at The Geek Group this week – Haas TM1 and TL1 machines. (CNC lathe and mill) This gave us the opportunity to re-arrange the machine shop… I think it’s quite pretty! In the adjacent room is the SR-100, a CNC router table.

Filings on the inside of China CNC machine


Image by Alex Rubystone

Machine Shop


Image by lisbokt
We got a new donation over at The Geek Group this week – Haas TM1 and TL1 machines. (CNC lathe and mill) This gave us the opportunity to re-arrange the machine shop… I think it’s quite pretty! In the adjacent room is the SR-100, a CNC router table.

(www.tinymachining.com)
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