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How to Cut a Cigar with a V Cutter

How to Cut a Cigar with a V Cutter | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

How to Cut a Cigar with a V Cutter

 

From cigarhandbook.com with edits from The Chic'

 

How to cut a cigar

The first step involved in preparing a cigar for use is to open a passage way allowing air to circulate from one end of the cigar to the other. Some smokers elect to bite the tip off the cigar; its quick and easy solution and there is no need to carry around any tools, but really let's all have a little bit of taste. Most cigar connoisseurs however use specialized cutter that provides a clean, manicured, precise cut.

If a cutter is used, the incision should be made quickly and decisively. The cutter should be placed just above the cigar's cap line (the curved area that covers the head of the cigar) and clipped in one swift motion. This produces a clean cut which is desirable for smoking a cigar.

Once the cigar has been cut using the smokers preferred method, it is ready to be lit.

Types of cutters

 

The "V" Cut

The V cutter creates a wedge shaped notice in the cigars cap. This cut allows proper air circulation to occur. The smokes tar and residue accumulate on the sides of the wedge keeping the bitter taste away from the smoker's mouth. It can be difficult to keep a V cutter sharp because of its unique shape.

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Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it


Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

From CNN Money with edits from The Chic'

NEW YORK (FORTUNE) - Everyone knows Cuban cigars are illegal in the United States, thanks to the embargo on Fidel Castro's goods.

But what you might not know is that Americans can legally enjoy Cubans thanks to a loophole - if the cigars left Cuba before the embargo was imposed in 1962, they're perfectly fine to smoke and sell.

And in all likelihood, they're still good.

Another variety is the "Clear Havana" - cigars that were made decades ago in U.S. factories with Cuban tobacco (those are called "Clear Havanas" because customs officials used to sit in the factories, and clear the tobacco through customs as it was brought up from the warehouse basement). These tend to run about $50 to $150.

A third variety uses bales of Cuban tobacco that were brought into the United States before the embargo, but that wasn't made into cigars until recently. If the entire cigar – the tobacco filler, the binder leaf and the wrapper leaf - aren't entirely pre-embargo, then expect the cigars to cost less, in the $50 range. If the Cuban tobacco is diluted with Ecuadorian or other tobacco, it should be even cheaper.

 

Stay tuned as the story continues and you learn the best way to secure these precious treasures...


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Pre Embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cigars

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

H. Upmann is a brand name of premium cigar, made in two versions: one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in La Romana, Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA, now part of Imperial Tobacco. Established in 1844, the H. Upmann brand is among the oldest in the cigar industry.

Vitolas in the H. Upmann Line

The following list of vitolas de salida (commercial vitolas) within the H. Upmann marque lists their size and ring gauge in Imperial (and Metric), their vitolas de galera (factory vitolas), and their common name in American cigar slang.


Hand-Made Vitolas


Connossieur No. 1 - 5" × 48 (127 × 19.05 mm), Hermoso No. 4, a corona extra


Corona Junior - 4½" × 36 (114 × 14.29 mm), Cadete, a short panetela

Corona Major - 5¼" × 42 (133 × 16.67 mm), Eminente, a corona

Corona Minor - 4⅝" × 40 (117 × 15.88 mm), Coronita, a petit corona

Epicure - 4⅜" × 35 (111 × 13.89 mm), Epicure, a short panetela

Magnum 46 - 5⅝" × 46 (143 × 18.26 mm), Corona Gorda, a grand corona

Majestic - 5½" × 40 (140 × 15.88 mm), Crema, a corona

Monarca - 7" × 47 (178 × 18.65 mm), Julieta No. 2, a churchill

No. 2 - 6⅛" × 52 (156 × 20.64 mm), Pirámide, a pyramid

Petit Corona - 5⅛" × 42 (130 × 16.67 mm), Mareva, a petit corona

Regalia - 5⅛" × 42 (130 × 16.67 mm), Petit Corona, a petit corona

Sir Winston - 7" × 47 (178 × 18.65 mm), Julieta No. 2, a churchill


Edición Limitada Release


Magnum 50 (2005) - 6⅜" × 50 (162 × 19.84 mm), Double Robusto, a double robusto

Magnum 48 (2009) - 4⅜" × 48 (110 × 19.05 mm) Magnum 48, a short robusto


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Pre Embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cigars

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

H. Upmann is a brand name of premium cigar, made in two versions: one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in La Romana, Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA, now part of Imperial Tobacco. Established in 1844, the H. Upmann brand is among the oldest in the cigar industry.

Failure and reemergence

In 1922 both the Upmann bank and the cigar business went bankrupt.[1] A British firm, J. Frankau & Co., bought the brand name and continued production until 1935, when the company was sold to the recently established Menéndez y García Co., makers of the Montecristo brand.  This new ownership group continued production of H. Upmann cigars until the nationalization of the tobacco industry after the Cuban Revolution.

The favorite cigar of US President John F. Kennedy was the H. Upmann Petit Coronas. The night before the embargo was signed he had aide Pierre Salinger procure every box he could gather from Washington, DC tobacconists, for a total of 1,200 cigars.

Stay tuned for more of the H. Upmann story...


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Pre Embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cigars

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

H. Upmann is a brand name of premium cigar, made in two versions: one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in La Romana, Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA, now part of Imperial Tobacco. Established in 1844, the H. Upmann brand is among the oldest in the cigar industry.

 

Stay tuned for H. Upmann's history...

 

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Pre-Embargo Cuban Cigars

Pre-Embargo Cuban Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre-Embargo Cuban Cigars

Cuban cigars are coveted by cigar aficionados because they are considered the best in the world. But you can't legally buy modern Cuban cigars in America. However, you can buy Cuban cigars that were made before the U.S. trade embargo, or cigars made with tobacco prior to the embargo.

The term "pre-embargo" when applied to Cuban cigars is interpreted differently depending on whom you ask. A partial embargo was imposed in October 1960. It was strengthened to an almost total embargo in February 1962, and in February 1963 the embargo was extended to cover all things Cuban including traveling to and from there. So there is some debate over whether a pre-embargo Cuban cigar was one made before October 1960, February 1962, or February 1963. The bottom line is that bringing pre-embargo Cuban cigars into the U.S. can be tricky.

Pre-embargo Cuban cigars are legitimate for trading or importing into the U.S., but if you were to arrive at an airport and declare you had some pre-embargo Cuban cigars, you would almost certainly be in for an ordeal getting them past customs without original bills of receipt showing they were what you said they were.

Post-embargo Cuban cigars are illegal, as are Cuban cigars bought in another country and brought into the U.S. as personal items.

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Pre - Embargo Cigars

Pre - Embargo Cigars...

 

The terms are not synonymous. A pre - Castro cigar is one that was made prior to the coming of power of Fidel Castro on the 2nd January, 1959. They are also known as pre - Revolution cigars.

Three years later on 7th February, 1962 the USA banned all Cuban imports and exports and one year later on the 8th February, 1963 this was extended into a US embargo on all things Cuban including foreign travel to and from Cuba.

Hence a pre-embargo cigar is one that was made prior to the 7th of February, 1962. Or is it? There is also an argument that says that a pre-embargo cigar is one that was made prior to the later date of 8th of February, 1963 when the US embargo was imposed by President Kennedy. The point is to a certain degree academic because whilst there might be legitimate concerns within the US about which boxes can be traded you should be aware that trying to take any box of Cuban cigars, pre or post embargo, into the USA can be a very tricky operation.

According to the US government pre-embargo Cuban cigars are accepted as legitimate goods for trading or importation into the country. In practice, however, we do not recommend arriving at any US airport and declaring that you have a box of pre-embargo cigars in your suitcase. They will want to see original bills of receipt proving the legitimacy of your product and since you are highly unlikely to have such a bill then you might be better off not declaring anything at all. It's just a suggestion.

The situation for post-embargo cigars and the USA is pretty much well known by all cigar smokers so we will not attempt to repeat obvious information here though there is one point that many people are not aware of. The US Customs will seize any Cuban cigars bought in a third party country such as Spain, the UK or Canada etc and taken back to the USA as personal items.

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Interesting Facts & Information: » Pre-Embargo Cuban Cigars

Cuban cigars are coveted by cigar aficionados because they are considered the best in the world. But you can't legally buy modern Cuban cigars in America. However, you can buy Cuban cigars that were made before the U.S. trade embargo...

 

The term "pre-embargo" when applied to Cuban cigars is interpreted differently depending on whom you ask. A partial embargo was imposed in October 1960. It was strengthened to an almost total embargo in February 1962, and in February 1963 the embargo was extended to cover all things Cuban including traveling to and from there. So there is some debate over whether a pre-embargo Cuban cigar was one made before October 1960, February 1962, or February 1963. The bottom line is that bringing pre-embargo Cuban cigars into the U.S. can be tricky.

 

Pre-embargo Cuban cigars are legitimate for trading or importing into the U.S., but if you were to arrive at an airport and declare you had some pre-embargo Cuban cigars, you would almost certainly be in for an ordeal getting them past customs without original bills of receipt showing they were what you said they were.

 

Post-embargo Cuban cigars are illegal, as are Cuban cigars bought in another country and brought into the U.S. as personal items.

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Cuban Cigars: Lighting up Legally

Everyone knows Cuban cigars are illegal in the United States, thanks to the embargo on Fidel Castro's goods.

 

But what you might not know is that Americans can legally enjoy Cubans thanks to a loophole - if the cigars left Cuba before the embargo was imposed in 1962, they're perfectly fine to smoke and sell.

 

And in all likelihood, they're still good.

 

"Like wine, if cigars are properly aged, they get much better over the years," says Brad Berko, general manager of Paradise Cigar Company, a distributor to over a dozen luxury hotels and several dozen individual cigar collectors. "Pre-embargo Cubans are for cigar aficionados who enjoy the best of the best."

 

 

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Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

From CNN Money with edits from The Chic'

NEW YORK (FORTUNE) - Everyone knows Cuban cigars are illegal in the United States, thanks to the embargo on Fidel Castro's goods.

But what you might not know is that Americans can legally enjoy Cubans thanks to a loophole - if the cigars left Cuba before the embargo was imposed in 1962, they're perfectly fine to smoke and sell.

And in all likelihood, they're still good.

Here are the best ways to get your hands on the goods.

Buy at auction: Christie's

Christie's auctions cigars twice a year - in the spring and the fall - at its fine wine auctions in London. The next opportunity to bid on some of Christie's vintage cigars is May 18. The Fine Wine auction at its King Street London location will include about 15 lots of pre-embargoed Cuban cigars, which range from one cabinet of 100 cigars to a box of just five cigars.

Any pre-embargo cigar, regardless of where it's bought, is legal in the United States. Eager buyers can attend the auction, bid over the phone or online at Christies.com, or bid in advance by faxing a form to the bid office. The catalogs are posted online three weeks before the auction, and two to three days before the auction, full descriptions of the lots are available.

The benefit of buying cigars at auction is similar to that of bidding on wine: a stamp of approval of a reputable name like Christie's means the cigars promise to be well-preserved, and auction houses often have access to impressive collections.

Dealers

If you don't feel knowledgeable enough to spring for a box of Cubans, let a cigar dealer do the work for you. Vintage cigar dealers or brokers travel the world bidding at auctions and buying up rare boxes of stogies, which they then sell to high-end cigar shops and serious collectors.

Frank Baroudi is a cigar dealer who has a Web site -- REON.com -- that specializes in pre-embargo Cubans and Clear Havanas, and currently has between 200 and 300 boxes of the rare Cubans, which run from $500 to $20,000 per box of 25 to up to 1000 cigars.

In addition to providing a wide variety, Baroudi, who has consulted to Christie's, claims to be an expert at gauging authenticity. "There are 17 different ways I can tell if a box and the cigars are real – the date codes, the bands, the printing and registration, the smell of the tobacco, the color of the wrapper," Baroudi says.

Berko, who manages Paradise Cigar Company's distribution to hotels like the Ritz Carlton and Pebble Beach, will track down unusual cigars for his clients. Berko recommends that cigar enthusiasts get in touch with their local tobacconist's supplier. Even if their favorite cigar store doesn't stock Cubans, its distributor might.

Cigar stores

If you're looking to buy retail, several outposts such as Corona Cigar in Orlando, and J.R. Cigars in Manhattan sell a variety of pre-embargo cigars. In Las Vegas, a town made for splurging, stogies are easy to come by.

Michael Frey, owner of FreyBoy Tobacco, sells pre-embargo Cubans in four of his eight Las Vegas casino stores, for $150 to $300 each. "Someone might win $10,000 on a craps table and come buy a $200 cigar, someone else may buy a cigar and preserve it, like it's a piece of history."

Now, FreyBoy Tobacco is offering its priciest pre-embargo offering yet: a box of 20, 1959 Cuban cigars, in four brands and a variety of sizes, for $10,000. "Vegas is the perfect place to buy pre-embargos, people don't really care about money when they're here."

Hotels

A handful of luxury hotels and restaurants offer pre-embargo Cubans to make their guests' experience even more exclusive - and expensive. Pebble Beach Resort in Northern California has a Cigar and Cognac program; guests can choose between a $275 1955 Montecristo #2 and a $225 1952 Romeo y Julieta, which can be paired with cognacs that run up to $750 per drink and Scotch that tops $1,000 per shot.

"These aren't cigars and cognacs that you can find just anywhere," says Pebble Beach Lodge's beverage manager. "Cigars remind our guests that they're on vacation, they provide an opportunity to sit back and relax."

The Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale, Ariz., has a rare-cigar menu at its Thirsty Camel Lounge overlooking the desert. A 1953 Montecristo #3 goes for $525 and a 1940 Shaggy Gurkha for $150. Finally the Ritz Carlton in Phoenix and the Doral Golf Resort & Spa in Miami, also offer pre-embargo Cuban cigars.

But wherever you're buying, beware: Cigar dealers warn about making a purchase on the Internet unless it's from a very reliable dealer. In person, it's fairly easy to see if a cigar has been preserved against excessive dampness or dryness. If you can check out a vintage cigar in person, Berko recommends examining the outside wrapper, to make sure it looks fresh and the color isn't faded. Then squeeze the cigar to make sure it's neither too hard nor too soft.

Last but not least? Light up and enjoy.

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Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cuban Cigars

 

From CNN Money with edits from The Chic'

 

NEW YORK (FORTUNE) - Everyone knows Cuban cigars are illegal in the United States, thanks to the embargo on Fidel Castro's goods.

But what you might not know is that Americans can legally enjoy Cubans thanks to a loophole - if the cigars left Cuba before the embargo was imposed in 1962, they're perfectly fine to smoke and sell.

And in all likelihood, they're still good.

"Like wine, if cigars are properly aged, they get much better over the years," says Brad Berko, general manager of Paradise Cigar Company, a distributor to over a dozen luxury hotels and several dozen individual cigar collectors. "Pre-embargo Cubans are for cigar aficionados who enjoy the best of the best."

Indeed, real Cubans are rare and they're not cheap: They run from about $150 to $300, and at luxury restaurants or hotels they can ring up at more than $500. "Buying pre-embargos are like buying a diamond, you have to go to the right person," Berko says.

You also have to know what to look for. The most common types of pre-embargo Cubans are Montecristo, Romeo y Julieta, Ramon Allones and H. Upmann. These cigars tend to be smaller than their modern counterparts – about five and a half inches long and about a half inch in diameter.

The assortment of vintage cigars can be confusing. A true pre-embargo Cuban is made entirely from Cuban tobacco and was wrapped in Cuba - that's the priciest, and don't expect to pay less than $150.

 

Stay tuned as the story continues...

 

The Chic'

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Pre Embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cigars

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

H. Upmann is a brand name of premium cigar, made in two versions: one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in La Romana, Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA, now part of Imperial Tobacco. Established in 1844, the H. Upmann brand is among the oldest in the cigar industry.

After the Cuban Revolution

After the revolution, Menéndez and García moved the brand first to the Canary Islands, then the Dominican Republic, where production of this brand still continues for the American market under the ownership of Altadis SA.

The Cuban-made brand still remains a popular cigar in the world market, where it is made in a variety of fully handmade, hand-finished, and machine-made vitolas. In 2002, when Altadis SA bought a controlling share in Habanos SA, numerous changes were made to the Upmann lineup. The vast array of Upmann sizes was rationalized, with redundant and poor selling sizes among the company's more than 30 vitolas eliminated. By 2006, according to the company, the H. Upmann line had been whittled down to just seven handmade and five machine-made sized.

In 2005, Habanos SA made an uncharacteristic move by releasing a new H. Upmann size as part of their annual Edición Limitada release. This is odd because the rule of the past has been that only the five globally distributed marques (Cohíba, Montecristo, Romeo y Julieta, Partagás, and Hoyo de Monterrey) have been used for Edición Limitada releases, whereas H. Upmann is a multi-locally distributed brand. This limited edition size was the large Magnum 50, thought to be an enticement to smokers with whom the Magnum 46 is very popular. Shortly afterwards, Quintero was demoted to a multi-local brand in the Habanos portfolio and H. Upmann was raised to a global brand, with distribution in every nation that imports Habanos cigars.

H. Upmann also produces two machine-made cigarillos (the Mini and the Purito) and a brand of cigarettes under the direction of ICT.

Stay tuned for more of the H. Upmann story...

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Pre Embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre Embargo Cigars

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

H. Upmann is a brand name of premium cigar, made in two versions: one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in La Romana, Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA, now part of Imperial Tobacco. Established in 1844, the H. Upmann brand is among the oldest in the cigar industry.

History

 

Establishment

H. Upmann is among the oldest cigar brands in existence, dating back to the 1840s. Around 1840, banker Herman Upmann opened a branch office in Havana, which provided ample opportunity to send cigars home to Europe.[1] The possibilities of a commercial endeavor became clear to Upmann and in 1844 he invested in a cigar factory and the H. Upmann brand was launched.

 

Upmann is sometimes even credited with the invention of packaging cigars in cedar boxes to give to their customers. These original boxes were labelled with the H. Upmann name and contained other manufacturers' cigars, most likely as an advertisement for the operation, until the Upmanns bought their own cigar factory in 1844: the famous H. Upmann Factory, now known as the José Martí Factory, in Havana. In another version of the story, it was the Upmann brothers' nephews, German and Alberto, who founded the fabric and the cigars simply became associated with it.

Through the late 1800s, the H. Upmann brand gained international recognition at various exhibitions and won seven gold medals which still adorn the lithographed art on today's H. Upmann boxes, along with Hermann Upmann's original signature.

 

Stay tuned for more of the H. Upmann story...

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Pre-Embargo Cigars

Pre-Embargo Cigars | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre-Embargo Cigars

Older cigars produced before the December 1959 Revolution are commonly described as "pre-Castro." Those made before President Kennedy declared the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba in February 1962 are "pre-embargo."

 This doesn't mean that a cigar must be more than three decades old before it's considered properly matured. Usually cigars develop a mature character after about eight to 10 years of age. That means that cigars should ideally have five to seven years of storage once they arrive from the factory because aged tobacco is used in the blends of nearly all premium hand-rolled cigars.

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Pre-Embargo - Are Cuban Cigars Legal?

Pre-Embargo - Are Cuban Cigars Legal? | pre embargo cigars | Scoop.it

Pre-Embargo Cigars - Are Cuban Cigar Legal in the US?

Cuban cigars are illegal in the United States, except for pre-embargo cigars which are very rare and extremely expensive. If U.S. citizens attempt to buy, own or bring any Cuban cigars into the U.S., they may be subject to fines and other penalties, depending on the particular circumstances.

Technically, although an American citizen cannot even purchase or smoke a Cuban cigar while traveling abroad, there may not be any practical way to enforce the restriction. That being said, a cigar smoker who ever wanted to try a Cuban cigar may want to take the chance while traveling in other countries. Canada and Mexico are not very far from many American cities, and those who are planning a Caribbean cruise will find Cuban cigars for sale on many of the islands. There is, however, a problem with counterfeit Cuban cigars being sold to American tourists. To improve the chances of getting the real thing, make your purchase from a reputable cigar store, and not one of the many street vendors that you'll see near the port. Do not buy any more cigars that you intend to smoke while abroad.

Know the Risks


Cuban Assets Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. Part 515, (Revised September 30, 2004) are administered and enforced by the Office of Foreign Assets Control. Criminal penalties for violation of the Regulations can go as high as $1 million for corporations, and $250,000 for individuals plus up to 10 years in prison. In addition, civil penalties of up to $65,000 per violation can be imposed by OFAC.

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What makes a cigar legal versus illegal?

President Kennedy signed the "Trading with the Enemy Act" on that date during the run up to the Cuban Missile Crisis. Later that year, in October, we experienced 13 days where the Soviet Union, Fidel Castro and the US went to the brink of nuclear war.

 

The law read that any and all Cuban products that the revenue went back to the Cuban government, became illegal for US citizens to consume, possess, trade, sell or give away anything Cuban from Cuba. In order to qualify as a Pre-Embargo Cuban Cigar, certain criteria must be met. The stamps and rings must coincide with the era and usually; some kind of traceable history will accompany most true Pre-Embargos.

 

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Cuban Cigars - Are Cuban Cigars Legal?

Cuban cigars are illegal for citizens of the United States, whether at home or traveling abroad, as a result of a trade embargo with Cuba. Fines and penalties for buying, smoking, and importing Cuban cigars may be imposed by OFAC. [Office of Foreign Asset Control]

 

Cuban Cigars Are Illegal at Home and Abroad

 

Technically, although an American citizen cannot even purchase or smoke a Cuban cigar while traveling abroad, there may not be any practical way to enforce the restriction. That being said, a cigar smoker who ever wanted to try a Cuban cigar may want to take the chance while traveling in other countries. Canada and Mexico are not very far from many American cities, and those who are planning a Caribbean cruise will find Cuban cigars for sale on many of the islands.

 

There is, however, a problem with counterfeit Cuban cigars being sold to American tourists. To improve the chances of getting the real thing, make your purchase from a reputable cigar store, and not one of the many street vendors that you'll see near the port. Do not buy any more cigars that you intend to smoke while abroad.

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Pre-Castro Cigars | Pre-embargo Cigars

Pre Embargo Cigar - Pre-Castro Cigars...

 

The terms are not synonymous. A pre-Castro cigar is one that was made prior to the coming of power of Fidel Castro on the 2nd January, 1959. They are also known as pre-Revolution cigars.

Three years later on 7th Febuary, 1962 the USA banned all Cuban imports and exports and one year later on the 8th Febuary, 1963 this was extended into a US embargo on all things Cuban including foreign travel to and from Cuba.

Hence a pre-embargo cigar is one that was made prior to the 7th of Febuary, 1962. Or is it? There is also an argument that says that a pre-embargo cigar is one that was made prior to the later date of 8th of Febuary, 1963 when the US embargo was imposed by President Kennedy. The point is to a certain degree academic because whilst there might be legitimate concerns within the US about which boxes can be traded you should be aware that trying to take any box of Cuban cigars, pre or post embargo, into the USA can be a very tricky operation.

According to the US government pre-embargo Cuban cigars are accepted as legitimate goods for trading or importation into the country. In practice, however, we do not recommend arriving at any US airport and delcaring that you have a box of pre-embargo cigars in your suitcase. They will want to see original bills of receipt proving the legitimacy of your product and since you are highly unlikely to have such a bill then you might be better off not declaring anything at all. It's just a suggestion.

The situation for post-embargo cigars and the USA is pretty much well known by all cigar smokers so we will not attempt to repeat obvious information here though there is one point that many people are not aware of. The US Customs will seize any Cuban cigars bought in a third party country such as Spain, the UK or Canada etc...


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