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Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students

Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Each student is unique and learns in different ways. There are many ways to use this diversity as a classroom strength.
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Preparing Your Students for the Challenges of Tomorrow

Preparing Your Students for the Challenges of Tomorrow | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Here are six ways to prepare students for their future, including the ability to collaborate, evaluate information accuracy, and make every day a learning experience.
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Questions about the Creative Mind

Questions about the Creative Mind | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
What does creativity mean? If you were to ask 10 people to define creativity, you are likely to get 10 unique and different perspectives. There are a number of creativity theorists who have made a career trying to define and study creativity. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management at the Quality of Life Research Center, suggested that exceptionally creative people are described as individuals who work hard for long periods of time with a clearly set intention in a domain in which they have a deep interest. Keith Sawyer, author of Group Genius, agrees that creativity consists of a lot of hard work but added that creativity is enhanced by consistently engaging in practices that develop good ideas. Eva Hoff, Lund University, positions creativity as the combination of two or more elements of reality in a new way with the intention to do something original. Thomas R. Fisher, Dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota, relates creativity to the thought process; however, Mark Runco, Professor at UGA, links creativity to bringing something new into existence, such as an invention, design, or work of art. Some theorists characterize creativity as a state of mature emotional intelligence, mental flexibility, and field independence (not relying on information provided by others).

When defining creativity, should it be characterized as personal creativity in order to consider individual differences? Does a child’s style preference (selfish vs. altruistic), attitude, level of curiosity, imagination, emotional maturity, stress tolerance, and self-efficacy impact creativity? Do birth order, extracurricular activities, cultural background, peer pressure, socioeconomic status, parental style (rigid vs. relaxed), and school culture influence creativity? How do all these individual differences work together in group creativity? Christophe Mouchiroud and Frank Zenasni, René Descartes University, have studied the individual differences in the development of social creativity, and determined that novel thinking can lead to behaviors which have a benefit to efficiently solving problems occurring in groups.

What role does imagination play in creativity? Are child paracosms (pretend play and imaginary worlds) a precursor to adult creativity? Eva Hoff stated that pretend play is a “necessary” part of the creative process in both adults and children. Marjorie Taylor, Professor of Psychology at the University of Oregon, studied the perspectives of a variety of theorists and found conceptual agreement that “imagination is a multifaceted capacity that emerges early in life, develops substantially during the preschool years, and continues to be fundamental to human thought throughout life.” Jerome and Dorothy Singer, Yale University, highlighted that “our human capacity for mental imagery representations, reenactments, and anticipatory constructions, which are all elaborations of our direct sensory experiences, may well be a defining characteristic of our species.” Another benefit of imagination is future thinking: the ability to contemplate the future, including theory of mind and inhibitory control.

As you can see from above, imagination and creativity are necessary for child development and success. I believe that imagination is the foundation for a creative mind. Programs, like Destination Imagination, enhance creative behavior and enable students to be flexible and adaptive in their thinking. Destination Imagination is unique in that it strives to teach the creative process from imagination to innovation. What do you think when you “imagine” a creative mind?

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Olaia Baquedano's curator insight, November 18, 2016 1:12 PM
¿Que es la creatividad? #SCEUNED16 | @scoopit via @LynnetteVanDyke http://sco.lt/...
Laura Largo's curator insight, February 24, 10:22 PM

I really liked this article since it focuses on creativity, and nowadays is one of the most talked topics/concepts of the 21st Century; besides, it is closely related to Critical Thinking. According to the author, creativity is "the thought process" which means that in order to create something new and original or to generate good ideas, critical thinking must be involved. Being creative it is not only imagining and putting into practice, as Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi cited by Cadle suggests "exceptionally creative people are described as individuals who work hard for long periods of time with a clearly set intention in a domain in which they have a deep interest." this means that "creating" it is a  hard and extensive process in which lots of skills (critical thinking skills) like: "observing", "analyzing", "reflection", "applying" among others,are necessary. 
Now, if a child is correctly instructed, he will develop critical thinking alongside with creativity and this will contribute to their development and success.

Bronte Wills's comment, May 25, 2:50 AM
Such a great article! I believe everybody has the ability to be creative; regardless of the manner in which we express it - which is only limited by one's imagination. Encouraging and fostering imagination and creativity in the classroom, is a key component of my pedagogy; as it is something that I found incredibly engaging and rewarding when I was at school.
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Components of Metacognition

This video covers the two components of metacognition that were proposed by Flavell: knowledge of cognition and regulation of cognition.
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Be the Dandelion: Finding Opportunity in Difficulty

Be the Dandelion: Finding Opportunity in Difficulty | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it

Whatever your challenge and whatever your tolerance for handling it, a continuous fight can be draining. Practicing resiliency can make it easier. Whatever your reason to go on, your family, a drive to exceed goals, to help others, or your passion for creating, resiliency will allow you to move past those things that knock you down so you can get up and accomplish what even you might not have known was possible.

Samantha Muchison's insight:

#goodadvice  #perseverance  #positivity

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25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great”

25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great” | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Look at this list of phrases. You won't just see replacements for the word “great,” you'll see catalysts. These are reminders of what you can look for in the
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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
New research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential.
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kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram | Powerful Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
David Kolb's learning styles model, and more free online materials for organizational and personal development, and free business training tools, tips and guides.
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