poverty within public schools
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Dropping Out of High School: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Remediation Strategi

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“Dropping Out of High School: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Remediation Strategies.” Map. R&D Connections. Web. 1 April 2014.

 The image sourced is a map of the United States showing overall the percentage of freshman that graduate. The map does this by shading the different states lighter or using different colors. There are three different category or percentage ranges presented on the map. This map is very useful and reliable when looking at the graduation rates among every state. Overall the map is easy to read and figure out.

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M. T. C. Library Remote Access -

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Rumberger, Russell W. Dropping Out: Why Students Drop Out of High School and What Can Be Done about It. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011. Web. 27 March 2014.

In the book Dropping Out it covers many different areas of this big topic, dropouts. A few being the extent of this dropout problem, and the individual consequences. Also it covers why students ultimately make the decision to drop out, and then what should be done to stop this growing problem. Rumberger does a good job at going in to detail with each one of these areas and explains each one well with good in depth information. This book is definitely reliable because it covers all the areas one could look in to when researching the problem of dropouts and poverty. This book would definitely be the way to go for someone researching and looking into the problem of dropouts. Overall this was a very helpful and reliable source to read and access.

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NPT: Good Food Means Better Students

NPT: Good Food Means Better Students | poverty within public schools | Scoop.it
American Graduate Let's Make It Happen. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), in partnership with America's Promise Alliance and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, has launched American Graduate: Let's Make It Happen — an initiative to help combat the dropout crisis in this country.
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Good Food Means Better Students. Southern Education Desk. Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 26 March 2014. Web. 31 March 2014.

The broadcast by the Southern Education Desk talks mainly about what schools can do in order to make the students learn better or pay attention and focus while in school. The way this particular school in the broadcast is doing this is by providing better food at every meal. Which means buying fresh fruits and fresh produce for every day. Even though it is more expensive to buy fresh fruits and food this school can already tell a difference in the way the students are learning. The broadcast Good Food Means Better Students gives a different view on the topic of dropout rates and poverty. Usually someone just hears the statistics about dropouts but this gives a different perspective, and also gives a different way a school may help this growing problem. This source is very reliable and can relate easily to the topic of dropouts and poverty. Lastly this broadcast would be helpful to someone looking at how better food throughout the day may effect a child’s learning.

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Turning Poverty into Promise: From High School Remediation to College Degrees

Turning Poverty into Promise: From High School Remediation to College Degrees | poverty within public schools | Scoop.it
Philadelphia Social Innovations Journal is the first online publication to bring a public focus to social innovators and their nonprofit organizations, foundations and social sector businesses in the Greater Philadelphia area, to recognize their successes and encourage others around the country to strive for similar results. As a forum for the region’s foremost social innovators, the Journal shares their expertise, strategies and ideas about topics such as leadership, human capital and disruptive innovation.
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Torres, Nicholas. “Turning Poverty into Promise: From High School Remediation to College Degrees.” Philadelphia Social Innovations Journal. (2011). Web. 1 April 2014.

Overall this is a very helpful and easy to read source. Also along with that is it is very easy to navigate. Nicholas Torres covers the topic of dropouts but takes a different perspective than the rest of the sources used. Even though he does talk mainly about dropouts he relates this issue to college, and being ready for college. Torres mainly focuses on one area, which is Philadelphia. He gives some good statistics for that area about high school dropouts and college graduates. Torres goes into ways to improve on this growing problem within the Philadelphia education system. He talks about and explains on two different case studies done. The first case study presented was the Camelot excel academies, which was between two high schools. The second one was the high school to college pipeline. He presents good information and details about both case studies, and even student perspectives on the studies. Torres’s scholarly journal would be good for anyone researching about high school dropouts, and also high school to college dropouts.

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M. T. C. Library Remote Access -

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Nocera, Joe. “Addressing Poverty in Schools.” The New York Times 28 July 2012: A23(L). Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 26 March 2014.

In this particular New York Times article the main focus is poverty and the effects poverty has on kids in public schools. Throughout the article it goes into detail about a speech given by Dr. Pamela Cantor, a psychiatrist that specializes in childhood trauma. Dr. Cantor founded a new organization in 2002 called, Turnaround for Children. This organization was used in hopes that it would help address the issue of poverty in the classroom. The article then discusses ways this program is believed to help this public school problem, and also how the organization works by giving details on what is done once inside a school. In 2008 this organization had an independent evaluation by the American Institutes for Research. After the evaluation it showed that the program was working very well but needed to have a bigger emphasis on academics. The article is helpful when looking at reasons why a student is not connected or putting any energy into learning. This source is also very useful when trying to find ways to fix this growing problem in the United States.

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Harper, Janice. “Socioeconomic Status.” Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals. Hoboken: Wiley, 2007. Credo Reference. Web. 1 April 2014.

In the essay by Janice Harper she mainly talks about the percentages of Americans living not only in poverty but in middle class and upper class. She explains and goes in to detail what each class is considered. Harper also tells what you have to have or not have to be able to be put in a particular class. For example she talks about the lower- lower class and tells what the percentage of the population that is. She also tells what each class’s percentage is. Lastly she breaks down each class more than just upper, middle, and lower. This article is somewhat different from the other sources only for the fact that it is does not just talk about dropout rates. This source can easily relate though to dropout rates because of the information in the essay.

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Poverty and high school dropouts

Poverty and high school dropouts | poverty within public schools | Scoop.it
Compared to high school graduates, dropouts are less likely find a job and earn a living wage, and more likely to be poor and suffer from a variety of adverse health outcomes.
Julia's insight:

Rumberger, Russell W. “Poverty and High School Dropouts.” American Psychological Association. 2013. Web. 27 March 2014.

This article by Rumberger goes over different areas of poverty. For example Rumberger talks about poverty within a family and then goes on to the community poverty. Throughout the article there are more startling statistics and numbers about poverty today and how it is effecting the world we live in. Rumberger also relates how being in poverty does effect graduating or dropping out. After reading this article one can better understand the extent of poverty and how it effects our public school students. This source is helpful because it shows you the numbers and statistics to go by when researching about the topic of poverty within public schools. This source would be helpful to someone looking into more of the poverty outside of schools rather than within them.

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As Poorest U.S. City, Reading Also Struggling With High Dropout Rate - YouTube

One city\'s struggle to regain its economic footing is also tied to significant problems in its schools. Jeffrey Brown reports from Reading, Pa., as part of ...
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As Poorest U.S City, Reading Also Struggling With High Dropout Rate. PBS. YouTube. 21 November 2011. Web. 26 March 2014.

In this YouTube video it focuses on a particular city, reading, which is known to be one of the poorest cities in the United States in 2011. For the majority of the video it talks about a particular charter school within the city. The school was named I Lead, and during this video it had just opened up in an old factory in Reading. This schools main focus is to help their students graduate from high school and achieve their goals. Throughout the video you get to hear from different students attending this school. The students talk about their past experiences and why they feel it is important to get out of high school and Reading. After viewing this video you get to hear more from the students stand point but also from other view points as well. This YouTube video is very helpful and reliable when trying to connect poverty and dropout rates. This video also does a good job at expressing the importance of getting out of high school and earning a diploma.

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The real 21st-century problem in public education

The real 21st-century problem in public education | poverty within public schools | Scoop.it
New data shows the problem getting worse.
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Strauss, Valerie. “The Real 21st-century Problem in Public Education.” Washington Post. 26 October 2013. Web. 27 March 2014.

In this Washington Post article the focus is of course poverty within the public education system. Throughout the article there is a big emphasis on what should be done to change the way our students in schools are learning. The writer of the article believes that if there is a change of teaching and policies than would have the children more interested. With that being said it would therefore help them to graduate. Also at one point in the article Valerie Strauss compares the high income schools to the low income schools. Which Strauss believes if these low income schools could change for the better and become more like the high income schools one would see a difference in the students and numbers of graduates. This article is very helpful and reliable when researching poverty or low income schools relating to dropout rates. Overall the source was very easy to read and access.

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High School Dropout Rate: Causes and Costs

High School Dropout Rate: Causes and Costs | poverty within public schools | Scoop.it
I wonder what these numbers would look like if we took the nearly $300K that taxpayers put in over the course of a dropout's lifetime and deposited it into their K-12 learning upfront.
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Lynch, Matthew. “High School Dropout Rate: Causes and Costs.” Education Week. N.p., 6 November 2013. Web. 26 March 2014.

This blog is a good source for looking at how much could change if the dropout rate decreased drastically. In this blog it gives major statistics on high school dropout rates. The first topic this blog looks at is why students are choosing to drop out of school. Which he then goes into the socioeconomic background and in that gives startling statistics about how much more likely someone from a low income family is to drop out compared to someone who is not low income. Then Lynch gives important information and numbers on how valuable earning a high school diploma is. Also what will happen for someone who does not graduate, including how much someone might make who is a dropout compared to someone with a degree. Lastly Matthew Lynch explains why this information is important to someone. Lynch talks about the drastic effects graduation rates increasing could have on our world today not only for the student graduating but the workers and taxpayers in America. This source is very reliable and helpful for looking at the statistics and numbers of everything that comes along with dropping out of high school.

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