Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon
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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon | Scoop.it
Federal education policy seems blind to the relationship between poverty and student performance.

Via Jim Lerman
L.tak poon's insight:

See-think-wonder


From the picture show above, I could clearly see that a woman is raseing a banner which writes"POVERTY HAS A WOMAN'S FACE" I could see from her expression on her face that she is not happy.


From the picture above, i think that she is probally on a stirke demanding on the issuse on poverty in her country. I think that she is voiceing out her words by writing on the banner above.


I wonder how many people actually suffer from poverty in the country, and also did the goverment help them to break free form poverty.I also wonder what are the goverment is going to do in order to help them.

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Ng Yao Zhu's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:16 PM

This article is a really detailed article describing the relationship between poverty and education. It tells us that a child's education is dependent on his or her financial income. With more money, the more care the child can get, and therefore do better in school. It also tells us the major flaw in George W. Bush's education law, "No Child Left Behind", which is by setting expectations beyond capability for all schools, eventually, the system failled due to its own goal.

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Micronutrient malnutrition and the impact of modern plant breeding on public health in India: How cost-effective is biofortification?

Micronutrient malnutrition and the impact of modern plant breeding on public health in India: How cost-effective is biofortification? | Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon | Scoop.it

+ http://www.ajstein.de/cv/biofortification.htm ;

Millions of people worldwide suffer from micronutrient malnutrition or "hidden hunger"; and it is mostly women and children in poor households who suffer from a lack of essential minerals and vitamins in their daily diets. These deficiencies can have devastating consequences for the life, health and well-being of the affected individuals, but they may also perpetuate a vicious circle of undernutrition, low economic productivity and poverty. Hence, in many developing countries vitamin and mineral deficiencies are public health problems of primary concern.

Economic development and rising incomes can only address undernutrition in the long run, but conventional approaches also have weaknesses that limit the overall progress in controlling micronutrient deficiencies. Therefore, "biofortification" may be a promising complementary intervention. The idea is to breed food crops for higher micronutrient content, which can be done through cross-breeding or genetic engineering. Targeting staple crops that fortify themselves already on the farmers' fields has several advantages: the enriched crops simply follow the normal food chain and they are eaten by the poor in bigger quantities. Moreover, the underlying germplasm of micronutrient-rich crops only needs to be developed once and can then be used around the world - and farmers can grow and reproduce biofortified crops year on year and share the micronutrient-dense seeds. Therefore, the initial investments in research and development (R&D) of biofortification can be followed by a continuous stream of benefits that accumulates over time and space, which suggests that biofortification can be a very cost-effective intervention.

Apart from two more limited studies that focused on "Golden Rice", which has been genetically engineered to produce beta-carotene, a more rigorous and comprehensive assessment of biofortification is still outstanding. This book has been written to narrow this knowledge gap and to offer a sound basis for future research and policy decisions regarding biofortification - covering both, crops that are produced through conventional breeding and genetically modified organisms (GMOs). For this ex ante evaluation of biofortification, an impact assessment of five different crops (iron-rich rice, iron-rich wheat, zinc-rich rice, zinc-rich wheat and beta-carotene-rich Golden Rice) has been done for India to determine their effectiveness. A scenario approach and various sensitivity analyses were used to probe the robustness of the results and to increase their reliability.

The main contribution of this study lies in the development of a methodology that reproduces the whole sequence of effects between the cultivation of the micronutrient-rich crops and their ultimate health impacts, taking into account various micronutrient levels in the crops, different rates of adoption and acceptance, and the ensuing improvements in individual nutrition status. To this end - apart from consolidating the use of the "dose-response" function to relate vitamin A and zinc intakes to overall health status, and apart from developing a method to link individual iron intakes via their cumulative distribution function to population health status - in this book the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) framework has been refined and applied to determine the disaggregate burden of disease of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), zinc deficiency (ZnD) and vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in India.

The assessment of the potential impact of the biofortified crops has been complemented by an economic evaluation, because mere effectiveness is a poor guide to policy making when resources are limited. Therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) have been carried out for each of the crops to determine their efficiency and their overall social profitability. The attributable costs of the R&D for the crops as well as the costs for related dissemination and extension activities within India have been juxtaposed to the expected health benefits. (In this context the costs for general social marketing campaigns and for more particular information, education and communication (IEC) programmes to introduce Golden Rice were explicitly taken into account.) The resulting cost-effectiveness measure ($/DALY saved) has been compared to alternative micronutrient programmes and to benchmarks of international organisations for assessing public health interventions. By attaching a minimum value to each DALY saved, the benefits of biofortification were translated into monetary terms to calculate a lower bound of the social rates of return of the crops. These economic indicators could then be compared to those of other agricultural technologies.

While conventionally bred biofortified crops are less contentious, genetically modified crops (GM crops) and, thus, the transgenic Golden Rice are controversially discussed in the ongoing debate about plant biotechnology. Therefore, related issues are discussed in more depth in special sections of this book. Having new consumer traits, Golden Rice is classified as second generation crop of the "gene revolution"; the validity of common claims about Golden Rice are scrutinized in a comprehensible and verifiable way; and, hence, the book seeks to provide a basis for informed decision making also in this field.

The study concludes that biofortification has the potential to help control vitamin and mineral deficiencies in a lasting and sustainable way - even though the commitment and the support of key stakeholders may be necessary to achieve its full impact. The various economic analysis have also shown that biofortification promises to be a very cost-effective, efficient and socially profitable intervention, both if compared to alternative public health measures and if compared to other agricultural innovations. Nevertheless, to control micronutrient deficiencies, the importance of a more comprehensive strategy is underlined; in such a strategy other micronutrient interventions like targeted supplementation, fortification, dietary diversification, nutrition education and poverty reduction may all have a role to play.


Via Alexander J. Stein
L.tak poon's insight:

 

Millions of people worldwide suffer from micronutrient malnutrition, mostly women and children in poor households who suffer from a lack of essential nutrition's. In  many developing countries vitamin and mineral deficiencies are public health problems. (36 words)

 

Bio fortification is an idea to breed food crops for higher micronutrient content, which can be done through cross-breeding or genetic engineering. Farmers can grow and reproduce bio fortified crops year on year and share the micronutrient-dense seeds, helping to solve the problem. Hence, bio fortification has the potential to help control vitamin and mineral deficiencies in a lasting and sustainable way

 

(96 words)

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Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform

Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform | Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon | Scoop.it
The Platform / In Aghbalou: The Source of Water, Director Remigiusz Sowa explores the most unlikely and perilous of friendships, water and the desert (#CEP researcher John has been involved with production of Aghbalou: film about water &poverty...

Via emav
L.tak poon's insight:

(See-think-wonder)

From my point of view, i could illustrate from the picture and the tittle that people in Todgha Valley, southern Morocoo are facing ininsufficient water in there daily lives.(see)

I think that the people there is really having a hard time finding water sources to support their daily needs in water. From my point of view, I think that water sources at the place are really hard to find so that is why water is linked with poverty in the article above.(Think)

I actually wonder what will the people in the country will to in-search for water souces and also how would the goverment help and think of a solution to help their citizens.(Wonder)

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Poon Ying Ying's curator insight, February 4, 2013 8:22 AM

From this article we can see that the people are lack of water supply due to climate change, population growth and poverty. We all know the water is an essential tool in our lives for survival, without water we cannot live. There are many purposes of water, for drinking purposes, cooking, bathing, washing and growing crops. The people living in the Moroccan Desert have been sustaining water through an advanced medieval system of lengthy underground tunnels, known as khettara that channel groundwater to the plots. Now the system have been augmented by the rumbe of water pumps and black plastic webs of drip systems and problems rises. I wonder how the people living in the desert are going to survive without water supply to  quench their thirst and grow crops to feed their kids?

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:24 AM

I can see from the trailer of the video that the Moroccan Desert might no longer be able to cultivate crops for the people to eat. Water is scarce and from the pictures of the dried up ground, I can see that droughts often occur. With the increasing temperature all around the world with extreme weather patterns occurring, the land might soon be too dry to cultivate any further. This film about the relation of poverty and water allows viewers to understand the situation that these people are facing. By exploring this situation in details, I think that the director hopes to bring across the message that we should try our best to save as much water as possible. However, if the day when the land becomes unsuitable for planting, how will the people survive as water is essential to survive? Will they adapt new plantation method?

Jacob Ng's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:34 AM

From this article, we can clearly see that the Moroccan Desert has a lack of water due to various problems that they faced.Like for example the Khettaras , where there go to get their supply of water is slowly drying up due to problems like climate change, population growth and conflicts of rights etc.Water is an essential need in our daily lives, we need it for hydrating purposes and as well as planting crops.With all these problems cloggin up their essential needs in life, how are they gonna live on their everyday.Thus, despite all these hardship it hink that these people have a strong will in living on no matter what comes their way.

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..:: Child Poverty in Asia ::..

..:: Child Poverty in Asia ::.. | Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon | Scoop.it

Via Thaqiv Idraqie, Lim Yi De, Megan-Nicole Lye Shuen Chi
L.tak poon's insight:

See-think-wonder

Form the above picture, i can see that there is an adult with 3 children in the picture taken above.It is pretty clear that the people above do not come form a wealthy family.Their clothing tells me that there are in a poor state of living..(see)


The children and the in the picture above did not smile when the picture is taken which i think that they are not happy. It may probally because needs are not met for their daily living.(think)


I wonder what there real problem is, weather is it because of money or other matter. I wonder if the goverment or anyone could help them in anyways.(wonder)

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Fabregas Vengaadesh Cena's curator insight, February 2, 2013 8:45 AM

This is my insight using the See-Think –Wonder thinking routine. I can see from this article that there is a woman carrying a child in her hand and there are two children standing next to her. They depict a common scene in India where a family is suffering due to poverty. I also found out that India is the poorest country in Asia and that Asia is accounted for two – thirds of the world`s poorest people. It is also due to the caste system in India which also contributes to the poverty as this system keeps many families poor from generation to generation by assigning certain groups of people to low status. I wish someone would lend them a helping hand and rescue them from their troubles

Yu Bixun's curator insight, February 2, 2013 8:52 AM

I can see that about two-third of the world's poorest people are from Asia. India had more than three hundred million of people living in poverty which is the greatest in the world. And because of this, many are uneducated with more time spent on fishing instead of studying. I think that wars are the main contributions to poverty as wars destroyed many farms, crops, settlements and people which caused many to be living in poverty. I think the children who are fishing or playing should attend schools as education can help them end their poverty state. People who are not in poverty state, we should excel in our studies and work hard in it as we are very lucky to be studying with proper education to look for job when we grow up. I wonder if regaining back their farms, industries and settlements could end their poverty state.

Tan Yang Heng Terence's curator insight, February 2, 2013 9:18 AM

After reading this article, i realised another factor leading to poverty in India. It is the Hinduism belief of caste system in India. It is the main religion in India. India have the most amount of people living in poverty in a countrycomparing to the rest of the countries. Almost all of them living in poverty earned less than $1 a day. Long hours of work and effort is put to that $1 that does not seems much in our eyes. 522 millions of people of India are suffering this unbearable situation. This system prevents many people from trying to break their poverty. It is very unfair as not everyone is given a chance to start out equal. Why does the poverty of the previous generation have to burden the future generations? However, a stop to such practise is equivalent to the lost of the culture. Thus, they will never have a chance to break poverty. They will be continue to be despise by others at the top of the caste system. It is such injustice. 

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Pak-Brazil seminar on food security, poverty alleviation why not join conversation in making of Floriade 2022

Pak-Brazil seminar on food security, poverty alleviation why not join conversation in making of Floriade 2022 | Poverty Assignment by_Leung Tak Poon | Scoop.it
DailyTimes delivers the latest breaking news and information on the latest top stories, entertainment, business, cricket, politics, and more.

Via VertiFarm
L.tak poon's insight:

Pakistan and top Brazilian experts came together to exchange knowledge on food security and poverty alleviation, to exchange knowledge and identify potential areas of cooperation between them.

 

For many years, Brazilians faces hunger and malnutrition. For that reason,

in 2003,Brazli created ‘Zero Hunger Programme’ which assure citizen able to access to healthy food. It's been successful and Brazil is defeating hunger, food insecurity and poverty.

 

On  March 2012,the Pakistani government ‘Zero Hunger Action Plan’ which benefitted 61 million people learning form the experience from Brazil's programme.

 

(92 words)

 

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