potato virus Y, avirulence
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Plant Breeding and Genomics News
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From immunity to susceptibility: virus resistance induced in tomato by a silenced transgene is lost as TGS overcomes PTGS - Catoni - The Plant Journal - Wiley Online Library

From immunity to susceptibility: virus resistance induced in tomato by a silenced transgene is lost as TGS overcomes PTGS - Catoni - The Plant Journal - Wiley Online Library | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it

The tomato line 30.4 has been obtained engineering the nucleocapsid (N) gene of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in plant genome, and immunity to TSWV infection of its self-pollinated homozygous progeny has been observed. Despite the presence of high amount of transgenic transcripts, the transgenic protein has never been detected, suggesting a mechanism of resistance mediated by RNA. In the present study we identify post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) as the main mechanism of resistance, which is able to spread systemically through grafting, and show that the 30.4 resistant plants produce both 24 and 21-22 nt N-gene specific siRNA classes. The transgenic locus in chromosome 4 shows complex multiple insertions of four T-DNA copies in different orientations, all with 3'-end deletions in the terminator and part of the N gene. However, for three of them, polyadenylated transcripts are produced, due to flanking tomato genome sequences acting as alternative terminators. Interestingly, starting at the fifth generation following the transformation event, some individual plants show a TSWV-susceptible phenotype. The change is associated with the disappearance of transgene-specific transcripts and siRNAs, and with the hyper-methylation of the transgene, that proceeds gradually through the generations. The shift from PTGS to a transcriptional silencing of the transgene, once reached a critical threshold, wipes out a previously well established virus resistance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


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TaEIL1, a wheat homologue of AtEIN3, acts as a negative regulator in the wheat–stripe rust fungus interaction - Duan - 2013 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library

TaEIL1, a wheat homologue of AtEIN3, acts as a negative regulator in the wheat–stripe rust fungus interaction - Duan - 2013 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
NEW PAPER TaEIL1, a wheat homologue of AtEIN3, acts as a negative regulator in wheat–stripe rust fungus interaction http://t.co/zLrGM8F00F
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This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology; a Genomic ... - PLoS Blogs (blog)

This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology; a Genomic ...
PLoS Blogs (blog)
van de Weg CAM, Pannuti CS, de Araújo ESA, van den Ham H-J, Andeweg AC, et al.
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This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology ...

This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology ... | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Keeping up with global health & development news, blogosphere, journals, forums, events, jobs and more.
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Cucumber virus affects hundreds of plants - The Daily News Online

Cucumber virus affects hundreds of plants - The Daily News Online | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Cucumber virus affects hundreds of plants
The Daily News Online
Plant viruses are the cause of many plant diseases and are responsible for huge losses in crop production around the world.
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Cucumber virus affects hundreds of plants - Herb Garden Design

Cucumber virus affects hundreds of plants - Herb Garden Design | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
by donkeycartCucumber virus affects hundreds of plants Try to keep the garden weed free. Choose resistant cultivars whenever possible. CMV is occasionall.
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Expression Microarrays in Plant-Virus Interaction - Springer

Expression Microarrays in Plant-Virus Interaction - Springer | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Expression Microarrays in Plant-Virus Interaction http://t.co/USewT5uFSd #springerlink
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MutS homologue hMSH4: interaction with eIF3f and a role in NHEJ-mediated ... - 7thSpace Interactive (press release)

MutS homologue hMSH4: interaction with eIF3f and a role in NHEJ-mediated ...
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Curly top virus infects California tomato crop - Capital Press

Curly top virus infects California tomato crop
Capital Press
SACRAMENTO -- As their harvest draws near, tomato growers in California's San Joaquin Valley are grappling with a plant-shriveling virus that is causing significant damage in some areas.
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This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology ...

This Week in PLOS NTD and PLOS Pathogens: Plant-Virus Ecology ... | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
van de Weg CAM, Pannuti CS, de Araújo ESA, van den Ham H-J, Andeweg AC, et al. (2013) Microbial Translocation Is Associated with Extensive Immune Activation in Dengue Virus Infected Patients with Severe Disease.
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from TAL effector science
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TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA-targeting proteins - Trends Cell Biol

TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA-targeting proteins - Trends Cell Biol | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it

 

(via Tom Schreiber, thx)

Doyle et al, 2013

Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are transcription factors injected into plant cells by pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas. They function as virulence factors by activating host genes important for disease, or as avirulence factors by turning on genes that provide resistance. DNA-binding specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats in each protein that correspond one-to-one with different nucleotides. This code has facilitated target identification and opened new avenues for engineering disease resistance. It has also enabled TAL effector customization for targeted gene control, genome editing, and other applications. This article reviews the structural basis for TAL effector-DNA specificity, the impact of the TAL effector-DNA code on plant pathology and engineered resistance, and recent accomplishments and future challenges in TAL effector-based DNA targeting.


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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Plant Immunity And Microbial Effectors
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Solanum resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans and their corresponding avirulence genes

Solanum resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans and their corresponding avirulence genes | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Summary
Resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi genes), the most important potato pathogen, are still highly valued in the breeding of Solanum spp. for enhanced resistance.

Via IPM Lab
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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A remarkable synergistic effect at the transcriptomic level in peach fruits doubly infected by prunus necrotic ringspot virus and peach latent mosaic viroid

Our results identify a novel synergistic effect of PLMVd and PNRSV on the transcriptome of peach fruits. We demonstrate that mixed infections, which occur frequently in field conditions, result in a more complex transcriptional response than that observed in single infections. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that the simultaneous infection of a viroid and a plant virus synergistically affect the host transcriptome in infected peach fruits. These field studies can help to fully understand plant-pathogen interactions and to develop appropriate crop protection strategies.

 


Via Ed Rybicki
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, May 30, 2013 4:44 AM

Who knew such simple things could interact in such a complex manner?  And so MANY plant diseases are caused by more than one agent.  Pity no-one really funds this kind of work much...otherwise I'd still be doing it!

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Farming vaccines with live plants - Mumbai Mirror

Farming vaccines with live plants - Mumbai Mirror | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Farming vaccines with live plants
Mumbai Mirror
"We use tobacco plants because they multiply and maintain our virus vectors very well.
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Insight to the Interaction of the Dihydrolipoamide Acetyltransferase ...

Insight to the Interaction of the Dihydrolipoamide Acetyltransferase (E2) Core with the Peripheral Components in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex via Multifaceted Structural Approaches* ...
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PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology | ViroBlogy

PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology | ViroBlogy | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Virus ecology looks at the more complex issues of virus-host-environment interactions. For plant viruses this includes studies of plant virus biodiversity, including viruses sampled directly from plants and from a variety of other ...
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Two viruses found throughout strawberry fields in the US. — Plant ...

Two viruses found throughout strawberry fields in the US. — Plant ... | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Both viruses are not new to strawberry in the US. Unfortunately for the industry, infected plants were unknowingly distributed to strawberry producers throughout the US. Last fall, some strawberry growers in southern states ...
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Solanum resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans and their corresponding avirulence genes - Rodewald - 2013 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library

Solanum resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans and their corresponding avirulence genes - Rodewald - 2013 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
RT @Prof_GD_Foster: Solanum resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans and their corresponding avirulence genes http://t.co/c55DtBVsrA
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Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viru...

Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viru... | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Plants respond to pathogens using elaborate networks of genetic interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense.
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UGA examines threat of tomato yellow leaf curl virus to tomato crops

.@UGA_CollegeofAg shows farmers how to prevent yield loss from plant disease in tomato crops http://t.co/WjnxDrmaXE @SanfordBishop
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Canada: Strawberry growers loses over 1 million plants to virus - FreshPlaza

Canada: Strawberry growers loses over 1 million plants to virus - FreshPlaza | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it
Canada: Strawberry growers loses over 1 million plants to virus FreshPlaza About 60 per cent of the strawberry crop at Webster Farms Ltd., in Cambridge, representing more than 140,000 quarts of berries, will be lost due to a counterattack against a...
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from TAL effector science
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Breaking the DNA-binding code of Ralstonia solanacearum TAL effectors provides new possibilities to generate plant resistance genes against bacterial wilt disease - New Phytologist

(Via T. Lahaye & T. Schreiber) De Lange et al 2013 Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating bacterial phytopathogen with a broad host range. Ralstonia solanacearum injected effector proteins (Rips) are key to the successful invasion of host plants. We have characterized Brg11(hrpB-regulated 11), the first identified member of a class of Rips with high sequence similarity to the transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors of Xanthomonas spp., collectively termed RipTALs. Fluorescence microscopy of in planta expressed RipTALs showed nuclear localization. Domain swaps between Brg11 and Xanthomonas TAL effector (TALE) AvrBs3 (avirulence protein triggering Bs3 resistance) showed the functional interchangeability of DNA-binding and transcriptional activation domains. PCR was used to determine the sequence of brg11 homologs from strains infecting phylogenetically diverse host plants. Brg11 localizes to the nucleus and activates promoters containing a matching effector-binding element (EBE). Brg11 and homologs preferentially activate promoters containing EBEs with a 5′ terminal guanine, contrasting with the TALE preference for a 5′ thymine. Brg11 and other RipTALs probably promote disease through the transcriptional activation of host genes. Brg11 and the majority of homologs identified in this study were shown to activate similar or identical target sequences, in contrast to TALEs, which generally show highly diverse target preferences. This information provides new options for the engineering of plants resistant to R. solanacearum.


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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Plants and Microbes
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PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology (2013)

PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology (2013) | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it

Viruses have generally been studied either as disease-causing infectious agents that have a negative impact on the host (most eukaryote-infecting viruses), or as tools for molecular biology (especially bacteria-infecting viruses, or phage). Virus ecology looks at the more complex issues of virus-host-environment interactions. For plant viruses this includes studies of plant virus biodiversity, including viruses sampled directly from plants and from a variety of other environments; how plant viruses impact species invasion; interactions between plants, viruses and insects; the large number of persistent viruses in plants that may have epigenetic effects; and viruses that provide a clear benefit to their plant hosts (mutualists). Plants in a non-agricultural setting interact with many other living entities such as animals, insects, and other plants, as well as their physical environment. Wild plants are almost always colonized by a number of microbes, including fungi, bacteria and viruses. Viruses may impact any of these interactions.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Microbes, plant immunity, and crop science
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Plant Cell: The Rice Resistance Protein Pair RGA4/RGA5 Recognizes the Magnaporthe oryzae Effectors AVR-Pia and AVR1-CO39 by Direct Binding (2013)

Plant Cell: The Rice Resistance Protein Pair RGA4/RGA5 Recognizes the Magnaporthe oryzae Effectors AVR-Pia and AVR1-CO39 by Direct Binding (2013) | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it

Resistance (R) proteins recognize pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins by direct or indirect binding and are multidomain proteins generally carrying a nucleotide binding (NB) and a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain. Two NB-LRR protein-coding genes from rice (Oryza sativa), RGA4 and RGA5, were found to be required for the recognition of the Magnaporthe oryzae effector AVR1-CO39. RGA4 and RGA5 also mediate recognition of the unrelated M. oryzae effector AVR-Pia, indicating that the corresponding R proteins possess dual recognition specificity. For RGA5, two alternative transcripts, RGA5-A and RGA5-B, were identified. Genetic analysis showed that only RGA5-A confers resistance, while RGA5-B is inactive. Yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer–fluorescence lifetime imaging experiments revealed direct binding of AVR-Pia and AVR1-CO39 to RGA5-A, providing evidence for the recognition of multiple Avr proteins by direct binding to a single R protein. Direct binding seems to be required for resistance as an inactive AVR-Pia allele did not bind RGA5-A. A small Avr interaction domain with homology to the Avr recognition domain in the rice R protein Pik-1 was identified in the C terminus of RGA5-A. This reveals a mode of Avr protein recognition through direct binding to a novel, non-LRR interaction domain.

 

Stella Cesari, Gaëtan Thilliez, Cécile Ribot, Véronique Chalvon, Corinne Michel, Alain Jauneau, Susana Rivas, Ludovic Alaux, Hiroyuki Kanzaki, Yudai Okuyama, Jean-Benoit Morel, Elisabeth Fournier, Didier Tharreau, Ryohei Terauchi, and Thomas Kroj


Via Nicolas Denancé
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Rescooped by Tian Yanping from Plants and Microbes
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Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease? (2013)

Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease? (2013) | potato virus Y, avirulence | Scoop.it

Plants respond to pathogens using elaborate networks of genetic interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense. In addition, plants also induce hypersensitive and systemic acquired resistance responses, which together limit the virus to infected cells and impart resistance to the noninfected tissues. Molecular processes such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA methylation are also critical to antiviral defenses. Here, we provide a summary and update of advances in plant antiviral immune responses, beyond RNA silencing mechanisms—advances that went relatively unnoticed in the realm of RNA silencing and nonviral immune responses. We also document the rise of Brachypodium and Setaria species as model grasses to study antiviral responses in Poaceae, aspects that have been relatively understudied, despite grasses being the primary source of our calories, as well as animal feed, forage, recreation, and biofuel needs in the 21st century. Finally, we outline critical gaps, future prospects, and considerations central to studying plant antiviral immunity. To promote an integrated model of plant immunity, we discuss analogous viral and nonviral immune concepts and propose working definitions of viral effectors, effector-triggered immunity, and viral pathogen-triggered immunity.


Via Mary Williams, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Andres Zurita's curator insight, May 29, 2013 8:28 AM

Open Access pdf

María Serrano's curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:30 PM
Respuesta inmune de las plantas frente a los virus.