Positive Psychology
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Positive psychology - is it just a fad?

Positive psychology - is it just a fad? | Positive Psychology | Scoop.it
Aren't you tired of watching self-proclaimed gurus on TV and Internet promising happy life and success... if you just remain positive and embrace love.
Amber's insight:

I really liked that the writer points out that positive psychology is a scientific study of happiness and not just “thinking positively” This is right along the lines of the definition of positive psychology in Exploring Psychology by David Myers. Positive psychology is defined as the scientific study of optimal human functioning; aims to discover and promote strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to flourish. (Myers, 2014) The study of happiness can tie into A Randomized Pilot of a Positive Psychology Intervention to Improve Adherence in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes by Jaser, Patel, Rothman, Choi, and Whittemore in 2014. In this study participant ages 13-17 with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers were randomized to a positive psychology intervention (Jaser et all 2014). The intervention condition used positive psychology exercises (eg, gratitude, self- affirmation), small gifts, and parent affirmations to boost positive affect. (Jaser et all, 2014). The author is this article makes some great points, however, the author describes herself as a parenting examiner, which could make this source appear not as credible as if this were written by a Psychologist. This article does not account for the influence of minority groups therefore those groups may not understand the full understanding of the article. The conclusion in this article appears to be reasonable because the writer based conclusions on quality sources such as Dr. Joe Accardi, a founding member of Canadian Positive Psychology Network. (Lee, 2014) 

 

References:

Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

 

Jaser, S.S & Patel, N & Rothman, R.L & Choi, L & Whittemoore, R (May 27, 2014) Check It!: A Randomized Pilot of a Positive Psychology Intervention to Improve Adherence in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: The diabetes educator Volume 40 number 5

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The Science of Positive Psychology: Putting Your Negativity Bias In Its Place With Stress Relieving Self-Hypnosis

Read more at: http://keystothemind.com/2014/11/10/the-science-of-positive-psychology-putting-your-negativity-bias-in-its-place-with-stress-relieving-self-hypnosis/ - Here is some useful information :) - With all the self-help books and pop psychology...
Amber's insight:

This article makes very valid thoughts. I felt the conclusion in this article appeared to be reasonable as the writer based the conclusion on quality sources such as a Professor Seligman, who is the Director of the Penn Positive Psychology Center. I thought the following comment is something that a lot of people today can relate to: “Telling yourself to be more positive, and actually feeling more positive, are two different things” (Nathan, 2014) Most people can tell themselves to be more positive, more outgoing, more motivated but when it comes to feeling it, sometimes that doesn’t come along as easily. The concept of positive neuroscience that was developed by Professor Martin E.P. Seligman in 2008 reminds me of the feel-good, do-good phenomenon, which is defined as “people’s tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood,” (Myers, 2014) The use of positive psychology to help people feel good and do good makes me think of a pilot of positive psychology interventions to improve adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. (Jaser, Patel, Russell, Choi, Whittemore, 2014) Participants in this study were asked to complete a numerous number of tasks but the most important was for adolescents, age’s 13-17, parents to praise them once a day. Small praises such as “you played great in your soccer game last night!” The results were showed there was a significant increase in levels of positive affect and measures of adherence, including self-report and meter downloads of glucose monitoring. (Jaser et all 2014) This article does not account for the influence of minority groups therefore those groups may not appreciate the full understanding of the article. The mission statement on this article is to "help you master your own mind, and show others how to do the same" I can see that a lot of people would enjoy learning to do this, it doesn't always make for the highest quality source. With that being said, the quality of the source appears high because the article does not use advertisements on its page and is trying to help people live a happier life. Overall I really enjoyed reading this article but the article does not accounts for the influence of gender and sexual orientation, or minority groups, therefore we don’t understand the full scope of positive psychology in this example.

 

References:

1. Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

2. Jaser, S.S & Patel, N & Rothman, R.L & Choi, L & Whittemoore, R (May 27, 2014) Check It!: A Randomized Pilot of a Positive Psychology Intervention to Improve Adherence in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: The diabetes educator Volume 40 number 5

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Positive Psychology News Daily » Positive Psychology Interventions with Depression

Positive Psychology News Daily » Positive Psychology Interventions with Depression | Positive Psychology | Scoop.it

"Sometime in the last century I was stuck in the Geneva airport waiting for a snowstorm to pass so that I could catch my long-delayed flight home. My mood had turned as bleak as the sky. This was no surprise. My default position seemed to hover somewhere just above depression. I fished Martin Seligman’s Learned Optimism out of my bag. Within a few pages, the seeds of my transformation were sown, and I had found a path that would lead to authentic happiness. A decade later I was a member of the first European MAPP class. When Martin Seligman came to speak to us, I asked him to sign my much-thumbed copy of his book, wondering if he ever still got that wet weather in the soul?"


Via Shelley Hourston
Amber's insight:

One of the strongest points this blog post makes is when she says, “If you focus on activities that increase your happiness, the likelihood is that your happiness will grow. If you focus on your depression as therapy often does, the chances are that you might get to know the black dog more than you care to…!” (Akhtar, 2012) I found this to be something we can all relate to. We are at our best when we are focusing on activities that increase our happiness. For example researchers are studying positive emotions by assessing exercises and interventions aimed at increasing happiness (Myers, 2014) If this is something researchers can understand more in depth, its possible there will be less and less depression in the world. It seems that this blog post is based on opinion and experience rather than any type of scientific study or article. The article does have one brief sentence that other authors and their colleagues confirm that positive psychology interventions are efficacious in alleviating depression just as they are in enhancing happiness and well-being. (Akhtar, 2012) In Positive Psychology and Attachment: Positive Affect as a Mediator of Developmental Outcomes, Holly Schiffrin points out “In other words, positive emotions broaden the way individuals process information and increase the type and amount of activities they want to pursue” (Fredrickson and Branigan 2005). Which really ties in with what Akhtar was concluding. While the author makes a lot of great points the post does not account for those groups of people who suffer from depression because of drug addictions or eating disorders, therefore those groups may not understand the how focusing on happiness bring happiness rather then depression.

 

References:

1.Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

2. Schiffrin, H (May 16, 2013) Positive Psychology and Attachment: Positive Affect as a Mediator of Developmental Outcome.

J Child Fam Stud (2014) 23:1062-1072

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Another FABULOUS Article on Happiness & Positive Psychology

Another FABULOUS Article on Happiness & Positive Psychology | Positive Psychology | Scoop.it
There is one emotion that the human race is dependent on, without this emotion the world would be a miserable and dangerous place.  This emotion, that keeps people smiling and moving forward in lif...
Amber's insight:

I really liked that this article said people’s definitions of happiness vary person to person based on experiences they have encountered in their lives. This is something everyone can agree with. While something may make me happy, that same thing may not make my sister happy. I’m also going to want to do things that make ME happy such as spending time with my niece. The article touches on Martin Seligman stating that happiness has three parts; pleasure, engagement, and meaning. (Knox, 2014) Pleasure is the “feel good” of happiness, which seems similar to the feel-good, do-good phenomenon, which is people’s tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood.  (Myers, 2014) The conclusion in this article appears to be reasonable because the writer uses information from Martin Seligman, who is a lead researcher in positive psychology. This article does not account for the influence of minority groups therefore those groups may not understand the full understanding of the article. While the author of this article has her phD, and touches on items from Seligman, the quality of the source could appear low. The author uses ad's on her page that could appear unprofessional and the purpose of this author is to sell advice as a life coach. 

 

Reference

Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

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Martin Seligman: The new era of positive psychology - YouTube

http://www.ted.com Martin Seligman talks about psychology -- as a field of study and as it works one-on-one with each patient and each practitioner. As it mo...
Amber's insight:

I thought everything Martin Seligman spoke on was very relatable for everyone in today’s society. Martin Seligman made a point that positive psychology should be 3 things and one of those caught my attention. “As interested in building the best things in life as in repairing the worst” I think this is something everyone can relate to. We want to live the best life we can which means we need to remember to focus on repairing the worst in our life. This reminded me of Exploring Psychology by David G Myers pointing out that “articles on selected negative emotions since 1887 have outnumbered those on positive emotions by 17 to 1” (Myers, 2014) Just like Seligman said in the beginning of his talk, 60 years ago psychology focused on “what’s wrong with you – spot the loony” and none of the disorders were treatable, but today 14 disorders are now treatable. Martin Seligman’s talk appears to be reasonable because he is a past-president of the American Psychological Association.

 

Reference

Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

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We're happier when we chat to strangers, but our instinct is to ignore them

We're happier when we chat to strangers, but our instinct is to ignore them | Positive Psychology | Scoop.it

It's become a truism that humans are "social animals". And yet, you've probably noticed - people on public transport or in waiting rooms seem to do everything they can not to interact. On the London tube there's an unwritten rule not to even look at one another. This is the paradox explored by Nicholas Epley andJuliana Schroeder in a series of nine new studies involving members of the public on trains, planes, in taxis and a waiting room.  The investigation began with rail and bus commuters travelling into Chicago. Dozens of them were recruited into one of three conditions - to engage in conversation with a stranger on the train, sit in solitude, or simply behave as they usually would. Afterwards they mailed back a questionnaire in which they answered questions about the experience. Their answers were compared to the predictions made by other commuters, who instead of fulfilling one of these three conditions, imagined what kind of experience they'd have had if they'd taken part.  The returned questionnaires showed it was those commuters who were instructed to strike up conversation with a stranger who'd had the most positive experiences (sitting in solitude was the least enjoyable, with behaving as normal scoring in between). Surprisingly perhaps, chatting with a stranger didn't come at the cost of self-reported productivity. These findings contrasted starkly with the predictions made by the commuters who imagined taking part - they thought that being asked to engage with a stranger would have been the least enjoyable of the three conditions. Epley and Schroeder said this provides evidence of a "severe misunderstanding of the psychological consequences of social engagement", thus providing a clue as to why, despite being social animals, we so often ignore each other.


Via Dr James Hawkins
Amber's insight:

I found this article very interesting and it approached one of my biggest fears – attempting to start a conversation with a stranger to only be shot down. The article uses examples like cabs, trains, and waiting rooms, but I can even relate this to an elevator. How often do you ride an elevator with a group of strangers and most times there is no eye contact or even a “hello” in such a small space. When I am riding the elevator with strangers and everyone is looking towards the ground avoiding eye contact, my mood is down, but if there is even just one person that offers a “hello, how are you” I can feel that I am happier, even from that small interaction, as the article suggests. One thing this article reminds me of is the feel-good, do-good phenomenon where “people’s tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood.” (Myers, 2014) For example, if I ride the train to work everyday for 30-60 minutes and I had a conversation with a stranger, who has made my day happier, I’m going to want to continue that for the rest of the day. I think this is a great study that people should try to engage in more often.  The conclusions in this blog post appear to be reasonable because the writer based the conclusions on studies in multiple scenarios. They even captured more introverts and extroverts during the study. The quality of this article source appears high because the source of the article is from the British Psychological Society. This blog does not account for children who are told to not speak to strangers so children and teenagers may not get this opportunity while in a waiting room or riding the train or bus. This article also does not account for those individuals who's English is not their first language, so they do not have the same opportunity to participate in daily commuting talk. 

 

Reference

Myers, David (2014) Exploring Psychology in modules New York, NY: Worth Publishers

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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:52 AM

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