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The 6 Quiet Rituals of Enormously Successful Humans

The 6 Quiet Rituals of Enormously Successful Humans | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Leadership and elite performance expert Robin Sharma shares his new inspiration training video The 6 Quiet Rituals of Enormously Successful Humans. (Invest in your personal and professional development.
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What I Regret Most in My Life Are Failures of Kindness

What I Regret Most in My Life Are Failures of Kindness | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For many college campuses, another school year has ended. With these endings also comes a celebration of beginnings as graduation and commencement speeches close one life stage to inaugurate another. While most of us are not graduating this year, many of these speeches impart timeless lessons that apply to many stages of life. As such, I thought I might share some wisdom from former commencement speeches.
David Hain's insight:

Commencement speeches - timeless advice for successful humans. And the best bits are always about humanity...

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The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Positive futures | Scoop.it
my colleagues and I set out to test whether intellectual humility was empirically associated with learning outcomes.

We started by measuring high school students’ intellectual humility. We had students rate themselves on statements like “I am willing to admit it when I don’t know something” and “I acknowledge when someone knows more than me about a subject.” We wanted to know: Would this self-reported intellectual humility relate to students’ motivation to learn, their learning strategies, and even their grades? What’s more, would teachers observe any differences between students with differing levels of intellectual humility?

We found that the more intellectually humble students were more motivated to learn and more likely to use effective metacognitive strategies, like quizzing themselves to check their own understanding.
We found that the more intellectually humble students were more motivated to learn and more likely to use effective metacognitive strategies, like quizzing themselves to check their own understanding. They also ended the year with higher grades in math. We also found that the teachers, who hadn’t seen students’ intellectual humility questionnaires, rated the more intellectually humble students as more engaged in learning.
David Hain's insight:

Does anyone, like me, struggle to ask for directions - "I can work it out". We don't know what we don't know, so admitting that is pretty critical to learning effectively, says science.

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3 crucial factors in overcoming messaging barriers

3 crucial factors in overcoming messaging barriers | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Communication is much richer, subtler and more complex than just a straightforward exchange between a receiver and a sender.

This complexity can cause confusion—even with simple face-to-face communication. Communicating on behalf of a company is even harder.

Professor Albert Mehrabian‘s studies in the 1960s sought to demonstrate the crucial importance of nonverbal communication. He argued that communication between two people consists of the context of words (7 percent), the tone of voice (38 percent) and body language (55 percent). Although many professionals dispute those numbers, the crucial importance of nonverbal communication is undeniable.

The question for communicators is this: How do you overcome communication barriers (including lack of nonverbal cues) when dealing with diverse, often dispersed, audiences?
David Hain's insight:

Communicating well will take you so far in life, and it's a skill that rewards knowledge and practice.

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10 Things You Don't Know about Yourself

10 Things You Don't Know about Yourself | Positive futures | Scoop.it
According to researchers, self-knowledge is even more difficult to attain than has been thought. Contemporary psychology has fundamentally questioned the notion that we can know ourselves objectively and with finality. It has made it clear that the self is not a “thing” but rather a process of continual adaptation to changing circumstances. And the fact that we so often see ourselves as more competent, moral and stable than we actually are serves our ability to adapt.
David Hain's insight:

Some scientific insights that challenge the extent to which we are as self-aware as we think. And since self-awareness is critical to success in life, worth thinking about...

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What Does It Mean to Have a Growth Mindset?

What Does It Mean to Have a Growth Mindset? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In her TED talk, which has been watched by more than seven million people to date, Dweck talks about the power of “yet.” This concept promotes the idea that everyone is on an individual learning curve and can continually improve and develop to achieve things in the future that they cannot yet accomplish.
Rather than thinking you’re not good at something — you’re not a strong presenter, you’re not good at balancing budgets, or you’re not good at tackling new technology — Dweck urges people to add “yet” to the end of the statement. You’re not a strong presenter yet. Or, you’re not good at learning new technology yet. Learning is an ongoing process, and what someone is not good at now may be something they’ll be good at a few months from now.
David Hain's insight:

"Yet' - a small word with huge implications for the most positive way we can live our lives and teach our kids!

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How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself 

How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
To stop sabotaging yourself, you must first recognize when you’re getting in your own way. Some of the time, we’re acutely and painfully aware of this—like when we find ourselves procrastinating before taking care of a (literal or figurative) mess, so that it becomes a bigger deal to clean up later. Or we impulsively buy a large bag of potato chips when we’re trying to cut back on junk food.

Of course, other times we’re less aware of our self-sabotage or we misdiagnose the core problem. This happens a lot in relationships. For instance, when you’re feeling competitive with the mom of your child’s playdate friend, you may get into a cycle of baiting and antagonizing each other, without recognizing your passive-aggressive interaction style. This gets in the way of you focusing on her great qualities and holds you back from potentially becoming good friends.

To stop sabotaging yourself, you need to figure out your patterns of behavior and then find creative ways to counteract them and form new habits.
David Hain's insight:

Self-awareness is the key to learning to manage and improve our 'screw-up' habits and behaviours.

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Mental health self-help guides tend to be dull, so I created a vibrant zine 

Mental health self-help guides tend to be dull, so I created a vibrant zine  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you wake up in the middle of the night with your mind swirling with thoughts, my hope is that you can pick up Swirl and that it will soothe you, help you feel a bit more in control, bring you back to the here and now. It’s something you could read on the bus on your way to work that will give you the positive mindset that you are in control of your thoughts.
David Hain's insight:

For anyone struggling with anxiety (or knowing someone who is - 1 in 4 of us?), a guide to some helpful resources available online.

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Why Our Brains Fall for False Expertise, and How to Stop It

Why Our Brains Fall for False Expertise, and How to Stop It | Positive futures | Scoop.it
One of the most important assets a group can have is the expertise of its members. But research indicates that even when everyone within a group recognizes who the subject matter expert is, they defer to that member just 62 percent of the time; when they don’t, they listen to the most extroverted person. Another experiment found that “airtime” — the amount of time people spend talking — is a stronger indicator of perceived influence than actual expertise. Our brains also form subtle preferences for people we have met over ones we haven’t, and assume people who are good at one thing are also good at other, unrelated things. These biases inevitably end up excluding people and their ideas.
David Hain's insight:

Turns out that the "Emperor's New Clothes" story has its roots in neuropsychology principles!

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Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It.

Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It. | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A growing body of research is making it clear that learners are made, not born. Through the deliberate use of practice and dedicated strategies to improve our ability to learn, we can all develop expertise faster and more effectively. In short, we can all get better at getting better.
David Hain's insight:

People/teams/organisations who learn better and faster typically outdo those who don't focus on learning. And learning well can be learned...

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Identity is a Fluid Social Construct – Nilofer Merchant

We are each many things. Our identity is multifaceted and distinctly our own. It is a function of where we’ve come from, our vertical identity: our parents, race, gender, age, socioeconomic status and so on. Our identity is also shaped by what we’ve developed: those skills and interests into which we’ve poured our 10,000 hours, and often (but not always) shows up in our vocation. But it’s not just our past or our work that defines us, we can also have as our identity those things we dream as possible, what I sometimes label as horizontal identity because it is what pulls us into the future. And as we grow and adapt, that identity shifts also.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent 1 minute read about who we are, and how this changes with context, and why that's important!

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Future proof your employability

Future proof your employability | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a new job but not having any luck, it could be your communication, adaptability or digital proficiency that's letting you down, according to a survey of 951 employers by recruiting specialist Hays.

The research shows that further down the list are emotional intelligence, technical skills, self-learning, data-based decision making and coding. It's important to future-proof your work so you're not being left behind in what's being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution, or digital revolution.

Jason Walker, Hays managing director for New Zealand, says there's one thing you can guarantee — that the workforce is going to change. And it's changing at a faster pace than ever before. "A lot of that is down to automation, artificial intelligence and other technology. It's changing how we do things, how we work with information, and it's providing employers with a lot of opportunity to reduce their workforce in certain areas and sectors."
David Hain's insight:

How to future proof your work, from recruitment expert Jason Walker.

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A technical primer on blockchain

A technical primer on blockchain | Positive futures | Scoop.it
BLOCKCHAIN, in many ways, appears to signify the dawn of a new era as it relates to the way we store and exchange value. In fact, it can be considered one of the biggest technology breakthroughs in recent history, similar to the advent of the Internet in the early 1990s. At that time, the Internet provided a new and more sophisticated way to search and share information, a way that was much more efficient and transparent.

Today, blockchain presents a similar value proposition and provides a way to transact in a secure, immutable, transparent, and auditable way. However, the understanding of the technology varies widely in terms of its potential and applicability. Through this primer, we aim to demystify blockchain and share our assessment of the current and future landscape, key drivers and impediments, potential applications, and considerations for companies.
David Hain's insight:

Seems like blockchain is here to stay and will have significant impact on future business. This is the best explanation I've seen yet about why and how. 

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7 Things You Need To Stop Doing To Be More Productive, Backed By Science

There’s a notable distinction between being busy and being productive. Being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean you’re being productive. Despite what some might believe, being productive is less about time management and more on managing your energy. It’s the business of life. It’s learning how to spend the least amount of energy to get the most benefits. I personally learned how to reduce my work week from 80 hours to 40 hours, and get a lot more work done in the process. For me, less is more.
David Hain's insight:

Don't always like these '7 things' things (clickbait) - but some of the suggestions here are very good, and given the increasing levels of stress being reported, potential life-savers!

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 29, 10:14 AM

The article highlights productivity, which I found to be directly transferable to strengthening one's resiliency and managing stress. So pick one of the seven and starting practicing it until it becomes a pattern and then move on to another one; soon you'll be more productive and resilient.

Steven Saura's curator insight, May 2, 5:43 PM

Useful data and tips.

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Why Aren’t More Men Working? - The New York Times

Why Aren’t More Men Working? - The New York Times | Positive futures | Scoop.it

With unemployment at 3.8 percent, its lowest level in many years, the labor market seems healthy.

But that number hides a perplexing anomaly: The percentage of men who are neither working nor looking for work has risen substantially over the past several decades.

The issue, in economist’s jargon, is labor force participation. When the Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys households, every adult is put into one of three categories. Those who have a job are employed. Those who are not working but are searching for a job are unemployed. Those who are neither working nor looking for work are counted as out of the labor force.

David Hain's insight:

Bad news for unskilled workers in latest US labour statistics!

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Why You Should Stop Being So Hard on Yourself 

Why You Should Stop Being So Hard on Yourself  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We’re all our own worst critics.” Ever heard that one before?

Yes, it’s an obnoxious cliché, but it’s not just self-help fluff. Evolutionary psychologists have studied our natural “negativity bias,” which is that instinct in us all that makes negative experiences seem more significant than they really are.

In other words: We’ve evolved to give more weight to our flaws, mistakes and shortcomings than our successes.

“Self-criticism can take a toll on our minds and bodies,” said Dr. Richard Davidson, founder and director of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he also teaches psychology and psychiatry.

“It can lead to ruminative thoughts that interfere with our productivity, and it can impact our bodies by stimulating inflammatory mechanisms that lead to chronic illness and accelerate aging,” he said.
But that’s not the end of the story. There are ways around our negativity bias, and it is possible to turn self-criticism into opportunities for learning and personal growth. (Really!) But first, let’s talk about how we got here.

David Hain's insight:

Practise self-compassion - you know you're worth it! And science provides the rationale....

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How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful 

How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Let’s be honest: For many people, work sucks. 

But for others, work is an adventure. The difference doesn’t always lie in the nature of the work. Two different people can have two very different responses to the same job—but my research has also shown that organizational culture makes a huge difference in how we feel about, and perform, at work.


I spent eight years measuring brain activity while people worked in order to identify the components of workplace culture that make work an adventure. This was preceded by a decade of doing laboratory studies to understand the brain basis for effective teamwork. 

I discovered that teams needed two key components to perform their best: trust among team members and an understanding of the purpose of their work. We found that both of these have a shared neurologic foundation, providing a framework to identify best practices when creating or modifying work cultures.

Trust and purpose do not magically arise in companies. Rather, they are strategic assets that can be measured and managed for high performance. My analysis showed that trust and purpose improve the triple bottom line: They are good for employees, improve organizational performance, and strengthen communities.
David Hain's insight:

Bosses and staffers making their way need to read this. Have you delivered/got trust in your team? Have you given/do you have an understanding of the purpose of your work? Huge impacts on energy, engagement, alignment and productivity are proven when both are present!

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An Ambitious Person’s Brutally Honest Take On Work-Life Balance

When asked what surprised him about humanity the most, the Dalai Lama replied:
“Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”
David Hain's insight:

Interesting life story that helps bring the quote from the Dalai Lama to life, and illustrates the balancing challenge that lucky people have.

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How Can We Become Better Humans? 

How Can We Become Better Humans?  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For decades now, psychologists have found that if there is an emergency but no one else is doing anything to help, then we are very unlikely to help ourselves. In their famous “lady in distress” study, for instance, Columbia psychologists Bibb Latané and Judith Rodin report that when participants heard cries of pain from a woman who had fallen in the next room, only 7 percent did anything to help if they were with a stranger who was not helping.

This is just one illustration of the darker side of our character, but there are others. Studies have found that we are quite willing to cheat for monetary gain when we can get away with it. We also tend to lie to about 30 percent of the people we see in a given day. And most disturbing of all, with encouragement from an authority figure, a majority of people are willing to give increasingly severe electric shocks to a test-taker—even up to a lethal jolt.

Yet there is also much more encouraging news about character. For instance, Daniel Batson has done more than thirty years of fascinating research on how empathy can have a profound impact on our desire to help others in need. In one study, after Batson got students to empathize with a complete stranger experiencing a terrible tragedy, the number of students willing to help her dramatically rose to 76 percent, compared to 37 percent in a control group.
David Hain's insight:

We all have a dark side, but a new book suggests that we can do something positive about that.

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How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None

How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How do you gain power when you have none?

More employers are opening new paths to leadership by encouraging employees to develop spheres of influence that have nothing to do with the org chart.

Such informal power is increasingly important—and valued—in today’s flatter organizations, where more jobs confer responsibility for teammates’ performance without the authority to give orders or dish out rewards or punishment, says corporate trainer Dana Brownlee, of Atlanta.

Specific behaviors can predict informal power, and many of them can be learned, she says. Networking across departments, building expertise in new areas and cultivating charisma are all ways to gain power, and make you a go-to person for colleagues.
David Hain's insight:

Some thoughts about gaining informal power. Turns out that taking an interest in others and always taking a positive view are perhaps more important than you might think...

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15 Signs You're an Introvert With High-Functioning Anxiety

15 Signs You're an Introvert With High-Functioning Anxiety | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Sometimes anxiety is obvious (think: panic attacks and sweaty palms), but that’s not always the case. Many people live with a secret form of anxiety called “high-functioning anxiety.” Outwardly, they appear to have it all together. They may even lead very successful lives. No one can tell from the outside that they’re driven by fear. Sometimes they don’t even realize it themselves.

Although not an official diagnosis, high-functioning anxiety is something many people identify with. It’s closely related to Generalized Anxiety Disorder, which affects 6.8 million adults in the U.S., women being twice as likely to experience it as men.
David Hain's insight:

Useful list of anxiety symptoms to watch out for, or to spot in others.

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Millennials in the gig economy

Millennials in the gig economy | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How well do we understand what millennial alternative workers generally look like, do, and want? As more organizations begin to leverage this supply of talent, what story does the data tell about millennials working in the alternative workforce? In this article, we examine over a decade of data and research collected on millennials entering and exiting the alternative workforce to identify potentially notable or statistically significant trends over the years. The data appears to point to six emerging and notable trends that should be on the radar of any leader seeking to leverage the millennial alternative workforce:
David Hain's insight:

What are people commonly known as 'millennial' all about? I don't like the stereotype generational descriptions, but this article seems well researched about early-adults today.

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The Lie That Perfectionists Tell Themselves

The Lie That Perfectionists Tell Themselves | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Spending more time at work and on specific tasks can actually hurt our performance, reducing the quality of our work. Research has shown that when weekly hours worked exceed 50 or 55 hours, cognitive performance (e.g., emotional intelligence skills and  the capacity to reason and solve problems) and work engagement levels begin to decline, dragging down the quality of the work produced with it. The relationship between reduced quality and working more is not new. In fact, Henry Ford’s primary motivation for cutting weekly hours from 48 to 40 was to reduce the number of errors his employees were making. Employers in a number of manufacturing industries have similarly found that they could maintain output and quality while decreasing employees’ hours.

David Hain's insight:

Examining the time/quality relationship, studies suggest that in these stressed out times we could benefit from re-assessing our personal frame around productivity.

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The Best Way to Help Your College Grad Land a Job

The Best Way to Help Your College Grad Land a Job | Positive futures | Scoop.it
he helicopter has landed.

After 20-plus years of arranging everything in their kids’ lives, from playdates to summer internships, parents need to step back so their college graduates can step up.

No matter how “helpful” parents want to be, too much help can sabotage the process. It’s time for the grads to “graduate” to adult life.

Here are six things parents need to know and do — from the sidelines.
David Hain's insight:

How to handle graduates - very topical and appropriate input for me as a parent who wants the best for their children.

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Just Do It! Women at Nike have major impact

Just Do It! Women at Nike have major impact | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When women at Nike brought their concerns to managers who they were supposed to be able to trust, they were ignored. When they went through formal HR processes to report harassment and unethical behavior by male colleagues, HR also ignored them. While many executives were aware of the problems, they "looked the other way."

So the toxic work environment continued and women were repeatedly passed over for promotions by less qualified men, publicly demeaned and called things like "a stupid bitch," sexually harassed, and excluded from being part of an inner circle of male decision makers. 

But a couple of months a go a small group of women banded together and revolted. Six top executives have resigned in the last month, the brand's reputation is tarnished, and the CEO is under pressure. 
David Hain's insight:

On the back of the Nike protest, how to rebel at work!

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HOW TO MANAGE CONFLICT: SIX ESSENTIALS

HOW TO MANAGE CONFLICT: SIX ESSENTIALS | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Afraid of conflict? You wouldn’t be human if you weren’t. However, if you train your brain to openly face conflict and negotiate win-win outcomes, you will grow your leadership effectiveness enormously. Managing conflict will create stronger bonds in a team, encourage beneficial business partnerships and improve your ability to inspire and engage. It is also a key to generating the creativity and innovation necessary to lead in today’s often turbulent markets.
As a hostage negotiator of over 45 years, my experience has taught me that what works in an extreme situation like a hostage-taking also works in a business setting. Hostage situations can be dramatic and intense, but you don’t hear about most of them in the news. That’s because more than 95% are resolved peacefully, without casualties, and with the hostage-takers accepting the consequences. Wouldn’t you like to enjoy this success rate in business?
David Hain's insight:

You won't get through a career without multiple conflicts. You'll probably hate the thought of addressing it, but (I know now) that's almost always what you should do. So maybe these tips from a hostage negotiator and leadership expert will give you courage...

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