Positive futures
26.1K views | +3 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by David Hain from A Change in Perspective
onto Positive futures
Scoop.it!

The Power of Mindfulness | Child Mind Institute

The Power of Mindfulness | Child Mind Institute | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Mindfulness: How a meditation practice can help kids with ADHD, anxiety, autism and depression become less anxious, more focused, and more in charge of their own behavior

Via Rhana Kozak, Bobby Dillard
David Hain's insight:

A remedy for all ages!

more...
Mónica Valero's curator insight, August 16, 2016 3:35 AM

In the last few years mindfulness has emerged as a way of treating children and adolescents with conditions ranging from ADHD to anxiety, autism spectrum disorders, depression and stress. And the benefits are proving to be tremendous.


Dr. Amy Saltzman explain us.

Positive futures
Let's make the future better!
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why Is It So Hard to Be Vulnerable? | GGM

Why Is It So Hard to Be Vulnerable? | GGM | Positive futures | Scoop.it

In her research, University of Houston professor and author Brené Brown has explored some of the reasons why we shy away from vulnerability. While we often celebrate it as a strength in other people, she discovered, we tend to see it as a weakness in ourselves.

“We love seeing raw truth and openness in other people, but we are afraid to let them see it in us,” she writes. “Vulnerability is courage in you and inadequacy in me.”

David Hain's insight:

There is great power in vulnerability. Yet we seem to admire it in other people, but fear it in ourselves, research suggests. Time to reframe our anxieties?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A neuroscientist reveals the most important choice you can make

A neuroscientist reveals the most important choice you can make | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Neuroscience research has found that when two people are in each other's company, their brain waves will begin to look nearly identical. One study of moviegoers, for instance, found the most engaging trailers all produced similar patterns in people's brains.

"The more we study engagement, we see time and again that just being next to certain people actually aligns your brain with them," based on their mannerisms, the smell of the room, the noise level, and many other factors, Cerf said. "This means the people you hang out with actually have an impact on your engagement with reality beyond what you can explain. And one of the effects is you become alike.

David Hain's insight:

Wonder why positivity is contagious? (Unfortunately, so is blame!!). Neuroscience offers the reasons why and suggests we choose our personal company carefully when we can.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

10 Psychological Predictors of Health and Happiness Across the Lifespan

10 Psychological Predictors of Health and Happiness Across the Lifespan | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Eighty years ago a team of physicians at Harvard University recruited two hundred and sixty undergraduates into a longitudinal study and followed them for life. The subjects received ongoing physical and mental health examinations, as well as assessments of personality type, career success, marital status, alcohol use, life satisfaction and more. Over the decades the study was expanded to include men and women from more diverse backgrounds.

Initially, the study identified risk factors we now take for granted, such as the harm caused by smoking, obesity, alcoholism, and loneliness. Moreover, the study went on to discover the psychological predictors of health and happiness across the lifespan.

So what psychological factors predict a long and happy life?

David Hain's insight:

 If "life is suffering", as Buddha is reputed to have said, we all need coping mechanisms. Are yours mature or immature? The answer makes a big difference, research suggests!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

There’s No Such Thing as Difficult People

There’s No Such Thing as Difficult People | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For years I’ve thought, “How fortunate I am to have the opportunity to work with such exceptionally good people!” But then my longtime collaborator Betty Sue Flowers suggested an alternative way of understanding these experiences. “These are not extraordinarily good people,” she said. “They are ordinary people whom you are enabling to be good through the way you are working with them.” So perhaps there are no difficult people — only situations in which people seem to us to be difficult. Flipping my perspective in this way has helped me to draw lessons from my professional life that can help us all deal with the so-called difficult others we know.
David Hain's insight:

Difficult people - we all have them in our lives. But are they, really, 'difficult' - or is it more about our perspective-driven behaviour? This suggestion about reframing the way we view 'difficult'  may help.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Reading this alone? Recent surveys reveal the curious truth about loneliness

Reading this alone? Recent surveys reveal the curious truth about loneliness | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s not surprising that many older people feel lonely. Friends may have died, they may have lost life partners, and their family – if they have one – may live some distance away.

But, according to the survey, it’s actually young people who say they are suffering the most. Forty percent of 16-24 year olds say they feel lonely, compared with only 27% of those aged 75 or older.

The results echo those of other surveys carried out earlier in the year.
David Hain's insight:

Older people are the lonely ones- right? Wrong  - apparently young people say they are the loneliest group. Interesting survey results.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Self-Deception: Realizing I Am the Problem

Self-Deception: Realizing I Am the Problem | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The following is an excerpt from the latest edition of the Arbinger Institute’s powerful book, Leadership and Self-Deception: Getting Out of the Box. Since its original publication in 2000, this book has become an international word-of-mouth phenomenon, selling more copies every year. The central insight—that the key to leadership lies not in what we do but in how we see—has proven to have powerful implications not only for organizational leadership but in readers’ personal lives as well.

The excerpt, taken from the third edition, is a conversation between Tom, the protagonist, and his new boss, Bud.

David Hain's insight:

The most effective (also hardest) road to consistent, authentic leadership starts with a good, deep look in the mirror. This vignette provides a useful example.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Urgency Bias Is Wrecking Your Ability To Lead

Urgency Bias Is Wrecking Your Ability To Lead | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Research conducted by Meng Zhu, Yang Yang, and Christopher K. Hsee found there is an inherent flaw in the human condition; we choose urgent and unimportant tasks over those tasks that are deemed more important, that require more time and effort to complete.

The researchers write, “We people may choose to perform urgent tasks with short completion windows, instead of important tasks with larger outcomes, because important tasks are more difficult and further away from goal completion, urgent tasks involve more immediate and certain payoffs or people want to finish the urgent tasks first and then work on important tasks later.”
David Hain's insight:

Urgency bias - and how it can screw you up!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Turning Job Interview Obstacles Into Opportunities

Turning Job Interview Obstacles Into Opportunities | Positive futures | Scoop.it
I’ve seen every background imaginable: astronaut, prime minister, Navy SEAL. And every hobby under the sun: world-class sushi chef, axe-throwing champion, ice carver. 

Among the most memorable résumés, though, was one that listed an 18-month “community service project” that involved working on a “Friends of the Highway” project. As it turned out, the “assignment” was actually 18 months of prison time. The person didn’t get the job—but not for the reason you might suspect. It had nothing to do with the fact he’d served time, but rather because he’d so blatantly lied about it.

When you face a potential sticking point in your career history, remember your “ACT”: be authentic, make a connection and give others a taste of who you really are. This applies to writing your résumé, answering questions in job interviews and networking with others inside and outside the company.
David Hain's insight:

Useful quick tips on getting that job, regardless of the bits of your past that you are less proud of!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Until recently, city leaders thought of smart technologies primarily as tools for becoming more efficient behind the scenes. Now technology is being injected more directly into the lives of residents. Smartphones have become the keys to the city, putting instant information about transit, traffic, health services, safety alerts, and community news into millions of hands.

David Hain's insight:

Do you live in a 'smart city'? Get the McKinsey lowdown on what that could mean here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life 

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The era of hard-talking, tyrannical managers is over – both on and off the pitch. “Football, which I love and work in, is really bad at talking,” says Caulfield. “It does instructing and telling off but it doesn’t do talking and listening and empathy that well. It sounds a bit fluffy but that’s the world in which we now live, and the world in which these players have grown up.” Southgate, he says, realised early in his coaching career that instilling fear wasn’t going to work. “We all need a telling-off now and then – and he’s good at that, by the way – but you’ll get far more from putting your faith in people than you will anything else. People had this lazy opinion that he’s too ‘nice’ and they see kindness as weakness, but it’s the most unbelievable strength if you use it in the right way.”
David Hain's insight:

I know they lost last night in the semi-final, but this article still resonates, and the contents (reframing, learning from failure, etc) will help them go further in future. Positive psychology really works, and tomorrow's leaders need to get on board with it - because the England football team is in effect an analog for every team that wants to deliver collective success and well being!

more...
Tom Wojick's curator insight, July 12, 11:02 AM

A great example of a coach/leader utilizing Relationship - Centered Leadership: Presence (EQ), Resiliency, Trustworthiness, Moral Courage, Purpose, Authenticity

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 17, 3:53 AM
How the psychology of the England football team could change your life
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A Million Minds: Building Unshakeable Foundations for Transformational Change

The world needs a new generation of bright-eyed, open hearted leaders with the confidence and skills to inspire change at speed and scale. Million Minds is a new platform being built by progressive educators and activists in businesses and community to find and share the best resources imaginable to help those future leaders grow.
David Hain's insight:

Nice article on a really exciting new initiative to build a coalition of transformational change agents!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Design for Your Strengths

Design for Your Strengths | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My biggest failure, just like my biggest weakness, has now become a source of success. As I share my story, I connect on a human level with people around the world. People everywhere relate to the narrative of fighting a system and forging a new path — not for the sake of bucking the status quo, but because everyone needs to find his or her own distinctive path to success. It is not easy to know your strengths, and it is even more difficult to put them to use and build on them. It may require you to look outside standard approaches to getting things done. But if you can step back, accept your weaknesses, recognize your specific strengths, solve the right problems, and design your own way of winning, you too might find your life has changed. This way of going through life is not for everyone, perhaps. But neither is the struggle many of us put ourselves through — the struggle against our own innate capabilities.
David Hain's insight:

Persuasive tale of how to turn strengths to your advantage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today

5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Interpersonal skills – such as managing time and positively interacting with others – are important for overall success
David Hain's insight:

Since the soft stuff is the hard stuff, any tips on how to develop your human interaction skills are worth spending 3 minutes on!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 11, 6:51 PM
5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

4 Indicators Your CEO is Not Interested in Your Burnout

4 Indicators Your CEO is Not Interested in Your Burnout | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My definition of caring about something includes both the emotional act of caring and the physical action of doing something about it. I do believe most CEOs care emotionally about burnout, but not enough are actually doing something about it. But let’s be clear, your CEO has the power to do almost anything she/he wants, especially when times are good, so they bear the responsibility for a burnout crisis.

This year I spoke at or attended a total of 12 conferences. At all of the ones I spoke at I typically asked 2 questions:

How many of you have experienced serious burnout from work?
How many of you have been through a merger or acquisition event in the last 5 years?

At every one of the conferences, at least three-fourths of the audience, ranging from 50 – 400 in size, raised their hands both times. Seeing all the hands go up quickly was both impressive and sad. However not surprising.
David Hain's insight:

You have the biggest interest in your own future, and that means your wellbeing is your responsibility. Fan your own flame, don't let it burn out! And don't expect your organisation to look after it for you - even though it should...

more...
Tom Wojick's curator insight, November 8, 8:44 AM

Yes, leaders and organizations are a significant factor in stress and burnout. That being said, the person most responsible and the one who can to do the most to manage and prevent burnout is you. Resilient people accept responsibility for their circumstances and take action to reduce, change or prevent factors that steal their vitality. Resilient people and organizations never see themselves as victims. 

Tom Wojick's curator insight, November 8, 8:49 AM

Stress is a leading human factor in accidents and injuries and organizations can do a lot to address their organizational climate, and leadership and supervisor approaches to management that can help to reduce stress and therefore reduce it as a safety factor 

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why You Might Need a Coach

Why You Might Need a Coach | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A coach is a person who is responsible for managing and training a person or team; an expert who trains someone learning or improving a skill. (dictionary.cambridge.org/us) This somewhat narrow definition doesn’t quite grasp the coaching I offer to clients. But it does present a dilemma.

Some persons, including many leaders, aren’t ready to learn or grow. No amount of effort on my part will make much difference. It’s sad to see promising talent and skill squandered.

I recently did a podcast interview with someone I once mentored and coached. Here is the link if you would like to learn more about his experience. What’s Really Good Podcast.

What struck me most about Nathan’s journey was just how open and vulnerable he was during the coaching process. He credits me for much of his success but I would make the case that it was really his receptivity, discipline, and effort that made the difference. I was just a catalyst for change.

Why might you benefit from having a coach?
David Hain's insight:

Would you benefit from working with a coach? Podcast interview can put you in touch with one person's experience.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’

A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’ | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Buzzwords like “deep learning” and “neural networks” are everywhere, but so much of the popular understanding is misguided, says Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Sejnowski, a pioneer in the study of learning algorithms, is the author of The Deep Learning Revolution (out next week from MIT Press). He argues that the hype about killer AI or robots making us obsolete ignores exciting possibilities happening in the fields of computer science and neuroscience, and what can happen when artificial intelligence meets human intelligence.

The Verge spoke to Sejnkowski about how “deep learning” suddenly became everywhere, what it can and cannot do, and the problem of hype.
David Hain's insight:

The more we learn about how the brain works, the more Artificial Intelligence will improve. We should welcome AI, not fear it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Christine Porath: Why being nice to your coworkers is good for business | TED Talk

Christine Porath: Why being nice to your coworkers is good for business | TED Talk | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Looking to get ahead in your career? Start by being nice to your coworkers, says leadership researcher Christine Porath. In this science-backed talk, she shares surprising insights about the costs of rudeness and shows how little acts of respect can boost your professional success -- and your company's bottom line.
David Hain's insight:

Be nice. It's good for you. It's good for your colleagues. And it's good for business!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better

Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Starting 15 years ago, scientists have been studying the complex and mysterious emotion called awe—one you might have felt if you’ve stood in front of the Taj Mahal, hiked among towering redwoods, or had your mind blown at a concert, play, or ballet.

Inducing goosebumps and dropped jaws, awe experiences are remarkable in their own right. Moreover, a growing body of research suggests that experiencing awe may lead to a wide range of benefits, from happiness and health to perhaps more unexpected benefits such as generosity, humility, and critical thinking.

In our busy lives, seeking awe may be low on our list of priorities. But we might be underestimating its power. “One simple prescription can have transformative effects: Look for more daily experiences of awe,” writes the GGSC’s Dacher Keltner.

The latest research suggests that taking the time to experience awe—whether through engaging with nature, enjoying great art or music, or even bingeing on breathtaking YouTube videos—may be a pathway to improving your life and relationships.
David Hain's insight:

We all need a bit of awe in our lives - science explores the benefits.

more...
Tom Wojick's curator insight, September 27, 12:46 PM

What a high AWE is! 

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, November 18, 5:08 AM
Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

10 reasons Finland's school system is better 

10 reasons Finland's school system is better  | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Many people are familiar with the stereotype of the hard-working, rote memorization, myopic tunnel vision of Eastern Asian study and work ethics. Many of these countries, like China, Singapore, and Japan amongst others routinely rank in the number one spots in both math and science.

Some pundits point towards this model of exhaustive brain draining as something Americans should aspire to become. Work more! Study harder! Live less. The facts and figures don’t lie – these countries are outperforming us, but there might be a better and healthier way to go about this.

Finland is the answer – a country rich in intellectual and educational reform has initiated over the years a number of novel and simple changes that have completely revolutionized their educational system. They outrank the United States and are gaining on Eastern Asian countries.

Are they cramming in dimly-lit rooms on robotic schedules?  Nope. Stressing over standardized tests enacted by the government? No way. Finland is leading the way because of common-sense practices and a holistic teaching environment that strives for equity over excellence. Here are 10 reasons why Finland’s education system is dominating America and the world stage

David Hain's insight:

This article on the future of education is written from an American perspective - but it could just as easily be the UK that is the laggard when compared to Finland.

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, November 18, 5:35 AM
10 reasons Finland's school system is better
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Hiring managers say AI will change how we work within five years

Hiring managers say AI will change how we work within five years | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As new technologies emerge in what some have dubbed the Fourth Industrial Revolution, innovative companies have already begun to adapt, prompting reevaluations of workforce development strategies. Artificial intelligence, in particular, brings new possibilities -- like increased productivity and innovation. It also has sweeping implications for employee skill sets.
David Hain's insight:

Useful snapshot of the predicted impact of various technologies on the world of work, not least on the skill sets that will be sought after in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
On the face of it, maybe not. University professors, some of the most learned individuals in the world, are not generally known for their intellectual humility. And plenty of successful scientists, CEOs, doctors, artists, and political leaders master their trades without appearing to develop much intellectual humility.

Then again, as Nobel Prize–winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar noted, believing that you “must be right”—in other words, lacking intellectual humility—can actually stymie discovery, learning, and progress.

Given this puzzle, my colleagues and I set out to test whether intellectual humility was empirically associated with learning outcomes.
David Hain's insight:

The empirical benefits of intellectual humility!

more...
Tom Wojick's curator insight, July 31, 12:57 PM

One thing that is consistent in resilient people and organizations is the ability to know when you don't know and having the courage to admit to it. Curiosity didn't kill the cat; it gave it nine lives. 

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A Stanford researcher says we shouldn’t start working full time until age 40

A Stanford researcher says we shouldn’t start working full time until age 40 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For people smack in the mad mid-life rush of managing full-time careers, dependent children, and aging parents, nothing feels so short in supply as time.

But there is time to get it all done, says psychologist Laura Carstensen, the founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. The only problem is that we’ve arranged life all wrong.

A woman who is 40 years old today can expect to live another 45 years, on average, while 5% will live to see their 100th birthday. The average 40-year-old man will live another 42. For many people, most of those years will be healthy enough to continue work that doesn’t involve intense physical labor. So why are we still packing all of our career and family obligations into a few frantic decades?
David Hain's insight:

An interesting suggestion about reframing our working lives to suit our increasing longevity. radical to get started, but maybe sensible over time?

more...
rianne krielaart's curator insight, July 24, 6:18 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Thriving, resilience and surviving – Benefit Mindset –

“Everyone talks about resilience these days. It is not always a good thing. The resilience of the current systemic structures that are driving unsustainable behaviour patterns is taking us deeper into the mess we are in.” — Daniel Christian Wahl
We live in a rapidly changing world — a world where uncertainty or unexpected events are becoming more frequent. What worked yesterday isn’t necessarily going to be enough to see us into the future. Neither is trying to remain robust — attempting to stop all unexpected events up front.
Rather, all of this uncertainty is challenging us to become more aware of how we can use unexpected events to our advantage.
David Hain's insight:

Perhaps today's (and tomorrow's most salient capability - managing uncertainty wisely and skilfully!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Me & We – Benefit Mindset –

What is the self?
Is the world made up of 7.5 billion separate selves doing their thing or is there something more going on?
Because, for example, we know the self is not confined by the boundaries of our skin, but likely extends far beyond it. We also know we live in a profoundly interconnected world. As John Mir said, “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe”.
Therefore, are we separate and individual — or are we a collective that is interconnected and interdependent?
In this article, we explore the idea that the self is both separate and interconnected. Both a me and a we at the same time.
David Hain's insight:

Ash Buchanan on why helping others is in everyone's self-interest - and it's contagious!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

You Can Master the 3 Ways to Influence People

You Can Master the 3 Ways to Influence People | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Early in your career, or in individual contributor roles, influence is about working effectively with people over whom you have no authority. It requires the ability to present logical and compelling arguments and engaging in give-and-take. In senior-level or executive roles, influence is focused more on steering long-range objectives, inspiration, and motivation.

We’ve found that influencing tactics fall into 3 categories: logical, emotional, or cooperative. We call this influencing with head, heart, and hands.
David Hain's insight:

No leader ever survived long without being able to influence without authority. This simple taxonomy is a useful guide for practice, self-assessment and feedback.

more...
No comment yet.