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Pedagogy vs. Andragogy | My Island View

Pedagogy vs. Andragogy | My Island View | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Andragogy. May 3, 2013 by tomwhitby. Over this last year I have been fortunate to have been sent to many education conferences on behalf of SmartBrief in pursuit of content and guest bloggers for SmartBlog on Education.

Via Madjid Messaad
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The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
On the face of it, maybe not. University professors, some of the most learned individuals in the world, are not generally known for their intellectual humility. And plenty of successful scientists, CEOs, doctors, artists, and political leaders master their trades without appearing to develop much intellectual humility.

Then again, as Nobel Prize–winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar noted, believing that you “must be right”—in other words, lacking intellectual humility—can actually stymie discovery, learning, and progress.

Given this puzzle, my colleagues and I set out to test whether intellectual humility was empirically associated with learning outcomes.
David Hain's insight:

The empirical benefits of intellectual humility!

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A Stanford researcher says we shouldn’t start working full time until age 40

A Stanford researcher says we shouldn’t start working full time until age 40 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For people smack in the mad mid-life rush of managing full-time careers, dependent children, and aging parents, nothing feels so short in supply as time.

But there is time to get it all done, says psychologist Laura Carstensen, the founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. The only problem is that we’ve arranged life all wrong.

A woman who is 40 years old today can expect to live another 45 years, on average, while 5% will live to see their 100th birthday. The average 40-year-old man will live another 42. For many people, most of those years will be healthy enough to continue work that doesn’t involve intense physical labor. So why are we still packing all of our career and family obligations into a few frantic decades?
David Hain's insight:

An interesting suggestion about reframing our working lives to suit our increasing longevity. radical to get started, but maybe sensible over time?

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Thriving, resilience and surviving – Benefit Mindset –

“Everyone talks about resilience these days. It is not always a good thing. The resilience of the current systemic structures that are driving unsustainable behaviour patterns is taking us deeper into the mess we are in.” — Daniel Christian Wahl
We live in a rapidly changing world — a world where uncertainty or unexpected events are becoming more frequent. What worked yesterday isn’t necessarily going to be enough to see us into the future. Neither is trying to remain robust — attempting to stop all unexpected events up front.
Rather, all of this uncertainty is challenging us to become more aware of how we can use unexpected events to our advantage.
David Hain's insight:

Perhaps today's (and tomorrow's most salient capability - managing uncertainty wisely and skilfully!

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Me & We – Benefit Mindset –

What is the self?
Is the world made up of 7.5 billion separate selves doing their thing or is there something more going on?
Because, for example, we know the self is not confined by the boundaries of our skin, but likely extends far beyond it. We also know we live in a profoundly interconnected world. As John Mir said, “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe”.
Therefore, are we separate and individual — or are we a collective that is interconnected and interdependent?
In this article, we explore the idea that the self is both separate and interconnected. Both a me and a we at the same time.
David Hain's insight:

Ash Buchanan on why helping others is in everyone's self-interest - and it's contagious!

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You Can Master the 3 Ways to Influence People

You Can Master the 3 Ways to Influence People | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Early in your career, or in individual contributor roles, influence is about working effectively with people over whom you have no authority. It requires the ability to present logical and compelling arguments and engaging in give-and-take. In senior-level or executive roles, influence is focused more on steering long-range objectives, inspiration, and motivation.

We’ve found that influencing tactics fall into 3 categories: logical, emotional, or cooperative. We call this influencing with head, heart, and hands.
David Hain's insight:

No leader ever survived long without being able to influence without authority. This simple taxonomy is a useful guide for practice, self-assessment and feedback.

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How to Survive Your Midlife Blues 

How to Survive Your Midlife Blues  | Positive futures | Scoop.it

I’m in my 50s—a bit past midlife, but not exactly into old age. My kids have grown, I have a good career, my marriage is solid, and I’m still reasonably healthy. So, life satisfaction should be mine for the plucking.


But it’s not. I’m no happier than most people I know, and in many cases less so. Why am I in a slump when everything seems to be going, well, right?

That question is at the heart of Jonathan Rauch’s new book, The Happiness Curve. In his book, Rauch argues that a dip in happiness in midlife is a normal part of human development, and may even be a necessary precursor to later life satisfaction. He also suggests that if we can find ways to hang in there during this turbulent transition, our happiness will not just rebound, but will likely exceed our expectations.

David Hain's insight:

Don't let that middle-age down define your future - it's normal and temporary, and there is much that can be done to combat it!

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6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient

6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Change frightens us because it is a voyage into the unknown. Ironically, since the unknown forces us to adapt to new circumstances, it is also the place where we can develop new talents and strengths. If we are resilient, we can embark on a journey that moves us beyond self-limiting beliefs, boredom, and lack of confidence.

Change is the great dream of every heart because it moves us closer to our full potential. To refuse the challenge that comes with change can be a great act of self-neglect.

If you have mental toughness, you will do anything to break the cycle of behavior that disempowers you. To push beyond your limits takes a resilient mind. It requires you to move into your discomfort zone and cross a threshold that awakens a variety of emotions such as confusion, fear, excitement, sadness—and yes, dreams.

There should always be a healthy tension between the life we have settled for and the potential that still calls us.

Here are 6 easy steps to make you more resilient:
David Hain's insight:

FBI veteran LaRae Quy on how to develop the resilience we all need.

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What I Regret Most in My Life Are Failures of Kindness

What I Regret Most in My Life Are Failures of Kindness | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For many college campuses, another school year has ended. With these endings also comes a celebration of beginnings as graduation and commencement speeches close one life stage to inaugurate another. While most of us are not graduating this year, many of these speeches impart timeless lessons that apply to many stages of life. As such, I thought I might share some wisdom from former commencement speeches.
David Hain's insight:

Commencement speeches - timeless advice for successful humans. And the best bits are always about humanity...

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The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Positive futures | Scoop.it
my colleagues and I set out to test whether intellectual humility was empirically associated with learning outcomes.

We started by measuring high school students’ intellectual humility. We had students rate themselves on statements like “I am willing to admit it when I don’t know something” and “I acknowledge when someone knows more than me about a subject.” We wanted to know: Would this self-reported intellectual humility relate to students’ motivation to learn, their learning strategies, and even their grades? What’s more, would teachers observe any differences between students with differing levels of intellectual humility?

We found that the more intellectually humble students were more motivated to learn and more likely to use effective metacognitive strategies, like quizzing themselves to check their own understanding.
We found that the more intellectually humble students were more motivated to learn and more likely to use effective metacognitive strategies, like quizzing themselves to check their own understanding. They also ended the year with higher grades in math. We also found that the teachers, who hadn’t seen students’ intellectual humility questionnaires, rated the more intellectually humble students as more engaged in learning.
David Hain's insight:

Does anyone, like me, struggle to ask for directions - "I can work it out". We don't know what we don't know, so admitting that is pretty critical to learning effectively, says science.

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3 crucial factors in overcoming messaging barriers

3 crucial factors in overcoming messaging barriers | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Communication is much richer, subtler and more complex than just a straightforward exchange between a receiver and a sender.

This complexity can cause confusion—even with simple face-to-face communication. Communicating on behalf of a company is even harder.

Professor Albert Mehrabian‘s studies in the 1960s sought to demonstrate the crucial importance of nonverbal communication. He argued that communication between two people consists of the context of words (7 percent), the tone of voice (38 percent) and body language (55 percent). Although many professionals dispute those numbers, the crucial importance of nonverbal communication is undeniable.

The question for communicators is this: How do you overcome communication barriers (including lack of nonverbal cues) when dealing with diverse, often dispersed, audiences?
David Hain's insight:

Communicating well will take you so far in life, and it's a skill that rewards knowledge and practice.

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10 Things You Don't Know about Yourself

10 Things You Don't Know about Yourself | Positive futures | Scoop.it
According to researchers, self-knowledge is even more difficult to attain than has been thought. Contemporary psychology has fundamentally questioned the notion that we can know ourselves objectively and with finality. It has made it clear that the self is not a “thing” but rather a process of continual adaptation to changing circumstances. And the fact that we so often see ourselves as more competent, moral and stable than we actually are serves our ability to adapt.
David Hain's insight:

Some scientific insights that challenge the extent to which we are as self-aware as we think. And since self-awareness is critical to success in life, worth thinking about...

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What Does It Mean to Have a Growth Mindset?

What Does It Mean to Have a Growth Mindset? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In her TED talk, which has been watched by more than seven million people to date, Dweck talks about the power of “yet.” This concept promotes the idea that everyone is on an individual learning curve and can continually improve and develop to achieve things in the future that they cannot yet accomplish.
Rather than thinking you’re not good at something — you’re not a strong presenter, you’re not good at balancing budgets, or you’re not good at tackling new technology — Dweck urges people to add “yet” to the end of the statement. You’re not a strong presenter yet. Or, you’re not good at learning new technology yet. Learning is an ongoing process, and what someone is not good at now may be something they’ll be good at a few months from now.
David Hain's insight:

"Yet' - a small word with huge implications for the most positive way we can live our lives and teach our kids!

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How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself 

How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
To stop sabotaging yourself, you must first recognize when you’re getting in your own way. Some of the time, we’re acutely and painfully aware of this—like when we find ourselves procrastinating before taking care of a (literal or figurative) mess, so that it becomes a bigger deal to clean up later. Or we impulsively buy a large bag of potato chips when we’re trying to cut back on junk food.

Of course, other times we’re less aware of our self-sabotage or we misdiagnose the core problem. This happens a lot in relationships. For instance, when you’re feeling competitive with the mom of your child’s playdate friend, you may get into a cycle of baiting and antagonizing each other, without recognizing your passive-aggressive interaction style. This gets in the way of you focusing on her great qualities and holds you back from potentially becoming good friends.

To stop sabotaging yourself, you need to figure out your patterns of behavior and then find creative ways to counteract them and form new habits.
David Hain's insight:

Self-awareness is the key to learning to manage and improve our 'screw-up' habits and behaviours.

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Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Until recently, city leaders thought of smart technologies primarily as tools for becoming more efficient behind the scenes. Now technology is being injected more directly into the lives of residents. Smartphones have become the keys to the city, putting instant information about transit, traffic, health services, safety alerts, and community news into millions of hands.

David Hain's insight:

Do you live in a 'smart city'? Get the McKinsey lowdown on what that could mean here.

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How the psychology of the England football team could change your life 

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The era of hard-talking, tyrannical managers is over – both on and off the pitch. “Football, which I love and work in, is really bad at talking,” says Caulfield. “It does instructing and telling off but it doesn’t do talking and listening and empathy that well. It sounds a bit fluffy but that’s the world in which we now live, and the world in which these players have grown up.” Southgate, he says, realised early in his coaching career that instilling fear wasn’t going to work. “We all need a telling-off now and then – and he’s good at that, by the way – but you’ll get far more from putting your faith in people than you will anything else. People had this lazy opinion that he’s too ‘nice’ and they see kindness as weakness, but it’s the most unbelievable strength if you use it in the right way.”
David Hain's insight:

I know they lost last night in the semi-final, but this article still resonates, and the contents (reframing, learning from failure, etc) will help them go further in future. Positive psychology really works, and tomorrow's leaders need to get on board with it - because the England football team is in effect an analog for every team that wants to deliver collective success and well being!

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, July 12, 11:02 AM

A great example of a coach/leader utilizing Relationship - Centered Leadership: Presence (EQ), Resiliency, Trustworthiness, Moral Courage, Purpose, Authenticity

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 17, 3:53 AM
How the psychology of the England football team could change your life
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A Million Minds: Building Unshakeable Foundations for Transformational Change

The world needs a new generation of bright-eyed, open hearted leaders with the confidence and skills to inspire change at speed and scale. Million Minds is a new platform being built by progressive educators and activists in businesses and community to find and share the best resources imaginable to help those future leaders grow.
David Hain's insight:

Nice article on a really exciting new initiative to build a coalition of transformational change agents!

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Design for Your Strengths

Design for Your Strengths | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My biggest failure, just like my biggest weakness, has now become a source of success. As I share my story, I connect on a human level with people around the world. People everywhere relate to the narrative of fighting a system and forging a new path — not for the sake of bucking the status quo, but because everyone needs to find his or her own distinctive path to success. It is not easy to know your strengths, and it is even more difficult to put them to use and build on them. It may require you to look outside standard approaches to getting things done. But if you can step back, accept your weaknesses, recognize your specific strengths, solve the right problems, and design your own way of winning, you too might find your life has changed. This way of going through life is not for everyone, perhaps. But neither is the struggle many of us put ourselves through — the struggle against our own innate capabilities.
David Hain's insight:

Persuasive tale of how to turn strengths to your advantage.

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5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today

5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Interpersonal skills – such as managing time and positively interacting with others – are important for overall success
David Hain's insight:

Since the soft stuff is the hard stuff, any tips on how to develop your human interaction skills are worth spending 3 minutes on!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 11, 6:51 PM
5 Ways to Improve Your Soft Skills | Duke Today
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Show your map

Show your map | Positive futures | Scoop.it
‘What do you do?’ is a conversational gambit that many people dread hearing. How to respond? What if you consider yourself hyphenate, a multifaceted individual who, for pleasure or for income, does many things? What if you find it difficult to communicate this in a digestible way? What if your personal sense of identity and self-worth is founded upon the avoidance of neat labels and the impulse to categorise? Do you filter and select, presenting just part of who you are? Often this is the most convenient path to take.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughtful piece on identity and how we project it for different audiences by @richardmartinwriter. Well worth also reading his book, co-authored with Kenneth Mikkelsen @LeadershipABC, The Neogeneralist, for a wealth of material on how we express who we are.

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Tool to understand the important role of emotion in everyday life

Tool to understand the important role of emotion in everyday life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The main way a dysfunctional amount of emotion works
against people is that it causes them to react tothe events of
their lives instead of respond to them in the best possible
way.  It makes them less response-ABLE.  It makes it harder
to access and act on helpful advice and information they've
received.  People are less likely to consider consequences
before acting.  They are less likely to learn from their own or
others experiences.  They are more likely to violate their own
morals and values.  It's harder to function at levels people are
capable of, or might want to.  In all these ways, a dysfunctional
amount of emotion makes it harder to make the best possible
behavioral or lifestyle choice.
David Hain's insight:

Useful tool from Ray Mathis on how to diagnose and manage emotions, rather than being managed by them.

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Why Aren’t More Men Working? - The New York Times

Why Aren’t More Men Working? - The New York Times | Positive futures | Scoop.it

With unemployment at 3.8 percent, its lowest level in many years, the labor market seems healthy.

But that number hides a perplexing anomaly: The percentage of men who are neither working nor looking for work has risen substantially over the past several decades.

The issue, in economist’s jargon, is labor force participation. When the Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys households, every adult is put into one of three categories. Those who have a job are employed. Those who are not working but are searching for a job are unemployed. Those who are neither working nor looking for work are counted as out of the labor force.

David Hain's insight:

Bad news for unskilled workers in latest US labour statistics!

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Why You Should Stop Being So Hard on Yourself 

Why You Should Stop Being So Hard on Yourself  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We’re all our own worst critics.” Ever heard that one before?

Yes, it’s an obnoxious cliché, but it’s not just self-help fluff. Evolutionary psychologists have studied our natural “negativity bias,” which is that instinct in us all that makes negative experiences seem more significant than they really are.

In other words: We’ve evolved to give more weight to our flaws, mistakes and shortcomings than our successes.

“Self-criticism can take a toll on our minds and bodies,” said Dr. Richard Davidson, founder and director of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he also teaches psychology and psychiatry.

“It can lead to ruminative thoughts that interfere with our productivity, and it can impact our bodies by stimulating inflammatory mechanisms that lead to chronic illness and accelerate aging,” he said.
But that’s not the end of the story. There are ways around our negativity bias, and it is possible to turn self-criticism into opportunities for learning and personal growth. (Really!) But first, let’s talk about how we got here.

David Hain's insight:

Practise self-compassion - you know you're worth it! And science provides the rationale....

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How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful 

How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Let’s be honest: For many people, work sucks. 

But for others, work is an adventure. The difference doesn’t always lie in the nature of the work. Two different people can have two very different responses to the same job—but my research has also shown that organizational culture makes a huge difference in how we feel about, and perform, at work.


I spent eight years measuring brain activity while people worked in order to identify the components of workplace culture that make work an adventure. This was preceded by a decade of doing laboratory studies to understand the brain basis for effective teamwork. 

I discovered that teams needed two key components to perform their best: trust among team members and an understanding of the purpose of their work. We found that both of these have a shared neurologic foundation, providing a framework to identify best practices when creating or modifying work cultures.

Trust and purpose do not magically arise in companies. Rather, they are strategic assets that can be measured and managed for high performance. My analysis showed that trust and purpose improve the triple bottom line: They are good for employees, improve organizational performance, and strengthen communities.
David Hain's insight:

Bosses and staffers making their way need to read this. Have you delivered/got trust in your team? Have you given/do you have an understanding of the purpose of your work? Huge impacts on energy, engagement, alignment and productivity are proven when both are present!

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An Ambitious Person’s Brutally Honest Take On Work-Life Balance

When asked what surprised him about humanity the most, the Dalai Lama replied:
“Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”
David Hain's insight:

Interesting life story that helps bring the quote from the Dalai Lama to life, and illustrates the balancing challenge that lucky people have.

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How Can We Become Better Humans? 

How Can We Become Better Humans?  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For decades now, psychologists have found that if there is an emergency but no one else is doing anything to help, then we are very unlikely to help ourselves. In their famous “lady in distress” study, for instance, Columbia psychologists Bibb Latané and Judith Rodin report that when participants heard cries of pain from a woman who had fallen in the next room, only 7 percent did anything to help if they were with a stranger who was not helping.

This is just one illustration of the darker side of our character, but there are others. Studies have found that we are quite willing to cheat for monetary gain when we can get away with it. We also tend to lie to about 30 percent of the people we see in a given day. And most disturbing of all, with encouragement from an authority figure, a majority of people are willing to give increasingly severe electric shocks to a test-taker—even up to a lethal jolt.

Yet there is also much more encouraging news about character. For instance, Daniel Batson has done more than thirty years of fascinating research on how empathy can have a profound impact on our desire to help others in need. In one study, after Batson got students to empathize with a complete stranger experiencing a terrible tragedy, the number of students willing to help her dramatically rose to 76 percent, compared to 37 percent in a control group.
David Hain's insight:

We all have a dark side, but a new book suggests that we can do something positive about that.

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