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How to Weigh Your Options and Decide Wisely: Benjamin Franklin’s Pioneering Pros and Cons Framework –

How to Weigh Your Options and Decide Wisely: Benjamin Franklin’s Pioneering Pros and Cons Framework – | Popular Science | Scoop.it
A worksheet for the moral mathematics of decision-making from America's original prophet of self-improvement.
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Lake Lazarus: the strange rebirth of a Californian ecosystem

Lake Lazarus: the strange rebirth of a Californian ecosystem | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Amy Maxmen lauds a study of the bold project to rescue Owens Lake.
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Scientists say mysterious 'Oumuamua' object could be an alien spacecraft

Scientists say mysterious 'Oumuamua' object could be an alien spacecraft | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Avi Loeb, chairman of Harvard's astronomy department, has co-written a paper that argues the mysterious space object Oumuamua could be an alien spacecraft.
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Engineering yeast endosymbionts as a step toward the evolution of mitochondria

Engineering yeast endosymbionts as a step toward the evolution of mitochondria | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Endosymbiotic theory suggests that mitochondria evolved from free-living prokaryotes which entered the host cell and were retained as endosymbionts. Here, we model this earliest stage of the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondrial evolution by engineering endosymbiosis between two genetically tractable model organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae . In this model system, we engineered E. coli strains to survive in the yeast cytosol and provide ATP to a respiration-deficient yeast mutant. In a reciprocal fashion, yeast provided thiamin to an endosymbiotic E. coli thiamin auxotroph. This readily manipulated chimeric system was stable for more than 40 doublings and should allow us to investigate various aspects of the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondrial evolution.

It has been hypothesized that mitochondria evolved from a bacterial ancestor that initially became established in an archaeal host cell as an endosymbiont. Here we model this first stage of mitochondrial evolution by engineering endosymbiosis between Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae . An ADP/ATP translocase-expressing E. coli provided ATP to a respiration-deficient cox2 yeast mutant and enabled growth of a yeast– E. coli chimera on a nonfermentable carbon source. In a reciprocal fashion, yeast provided thiamin to an endosymbiotic E. coli thiamin auxotroph. Expression of several SNARE-like proteins in E. coli was also required, likely to block lysosomal degradation of intracellular bacteria. This chimeric system was stable for more than 40 doublings, and GFP-expressing E. coli endosymbionts could be observed in the yeast by fluorescence microscopy and X-ray tomography. This readily manipulated system should allow experimental delineation of host–endosymbiont adaptations that occurred during evolution of the current, highly reduced mitochondrial genome.
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Revealed: the extraordinary flight of the dandelion

Revealed: the extraordinary flight of the dandelion | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The floating of a seed shows how appreciating the wonders of the Universe can begin with a new look at the everyday.
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The Potato Whisperer - Gastro Obscura

The Potato Whisperer - Gastro Obscura | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Manuel Choqque Bravo’s delicious, colorful creations are adored by world-class chefs.
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CRISPR May Help Make the Groundcherry Fruit as Common as Strawberries

CRISPR May Help Make the Groundcherry Fruit as Common as Strawberries | Popular Science | Scoop.it
With new research coming out of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on the groundcherry fruit, the benefits of CRISPR continue to take notice.
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CRISPR gene editing relieves muscular dystrophy symptoms in dogs

CRISPR gene editing relieves muscular dystrophy symptoms in dogs | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have used CRISPR’s molecular scissors in beagle puppies to repair a genetic mutation that causes muscular dystrophy.
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Rhododendron? Hydrangea? America Doesn’t Know Anymore

Rhododendron? Hydrangea? America Doesn’t Know Anymore | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The country has a growing case of ‘plant blindness’—a term used by botanists to describe the inability to identify basic plants. Even biologists struggle. ‘Imagine a medical doctor who didn’t know how to identify the correct body parts.’
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How Crispr Could Transform Our Food Supply

A new technique has the potential to change the foods we eat every day, boosting flavor, disease resistance, and yields, and even tackling allergens like gluten—and scientists say they're working only with nature's own tools.
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Oldest Evidence for Life on Land Unearthed in South Africa

Oldest Evidence for Life on Land Unearthed in South Africa | Popular Science | Scoop.it
These ancient fossils may be the oldest documented evidence of life on land, pushing back direct evidence for terrestrial life by about 500 million years.
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Lake Hillier: Australia's Pink Lake and the Story Behind It

Lake Hillier: Australia's Pink Lake and the Story Behind It | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Framed by luscious Eucalyptus forests and the Indian Ocean, Australia's pink lake really looks out of place on Middle Island in the Recherche Archipelago. But why is it pink?
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Mail-Order CRISPR Kits Allow Absolutely Anyone to Hack DNA

Mail-Order CRISPR Kits Allow Absolutely Anyone to Hack DNA | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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Rare microbes lead scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life | CBC News

Rare microbes lead scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life | CBC News | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Canadian researchers have discovered a new kind of organism that’s so different from other living things that it doesn’t fit into the plant kingdom, the animal kingdom, or any other kingdom used to classify known organisms.
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Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections

Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Hanging in front of the abdomen like an apron, the depot of visceral fat known as the omentum helps regulate immune responses.
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To Learn, Students Need to DO Something

To Learn, Students Need to DO Something | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Too often, we're expecting students to learn material without asking them to do much of anything with it. Why is this a problem? Where did it come from? And how can we fix it?
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Da Vinci’s possible vision disorder may have influenced his art

Da Vinci’s possible vision disorder may have influenced his art | Popular Science | Scoop.it
An outward turn of the eye would have helped with 3D to 2D perspective.
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Chances DNA can be used to find your family? Sixty percent and rising

Chances DNA can be used to find your family? Sixty percent and rising | Popular Science | Scoop.it
If you're of European descent, there's a good chance that you can be found.
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Domesticating tomatoes took millennia - we can now redo it in 3 years

Domesticating tomatoes took millennia - we can now redo it in 3 years | Popular Science | Scoop.it
With CRISPR gene editing technology we can now rapidly domesticate wild plants to create tasty and healthy food
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The first footholds for land plants may have been much smaller than imagined «

The first footholds for land plants may have been much smaller than imagined « | Popular Science | Scoop.it
A polysaccharide found in the cell walls of land plants has now been found outside the cell. This chemical, Xyloglucan, could be one of clues as to how plants moved onto land.
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A Blended Family: Her Mother Was Neanderthal, Her Father Something Else Entirely - The New York Times

A Blended Family: Her Mother Was Neanderthal, Her Father Something Else Entirely - The New York Times | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Genetic analysis of bones discovered in a Siberian cave hint that the prehistoric world may have been filled with “hybrid” humans.
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USDA Unveils New Gene-Stacking Tool to Prevent Plant Diseases

USDA Unveils New Gene-Stacking Tool to Prevent Plant Diseases | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The European Union says no thanks.
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Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants

Combining on and off switches, one protein can control flowering in plants | Popular Science | Scoop.it
New research has discovered a previously unknown mechanism for controlling cellular decisions, one which combines an on-and-off switch in a single protein, either promoting or preventing the transition to flowering in plants.
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That’s Not Algae Swirling on the Beach. Those Are Green Worms. - The New York Times

That’s Not Algae Swirling on the Beach. Those Are Green Worms. - The New York Times | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Researchers demonstrated that plant-worms rotate in circular congregations along Atlantic beaches. But nobody is certain why.
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Botanical life in close-up – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Botanical life in close-up – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Colin Salter’s new book is a selection of extraordinary electron microscopic images of the plant world around us, including seeds, pollen, fruiting bodies, trees and leaves, flowers, vegetables and fruit
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