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Oklahoma families getting health care rebate

Oklahoma families getting health care rebate | Politics & your health | Scoop.it
TULSA — Thousands of Oklahoma families and businesses are receiving rebate checks averaging $126 per family from their health insurance companies because of the Affordable Care Act.
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What journalists need to know about this week’s Supreme Court Health Care Ruling | Poynter.

What journalists need to know about this week’s Supreme Court Health Care Ruling | Poynter. | Politics & your health | Scoop.it

Standing for journalism, strengthening democracy | Journalism training, media news & how to's...

 

 Just about every citizen and business will be affected by the Supreme Court’s decision on the Affordable Care Act, which will likely be made public Thursday, when the Court returns to announce the rest of this session’s rulings. The health care ruling, which may have been reached in March, will be posted on the Supreme Court website and liveblogged starting at 9 a.m. ET by SCOTUSblog. The decision will immediately be a national story, a legal story, a political story, a business story, a health care story and a local story. Let’s make sure you are ready to cover it.

The public has said that journalists spend too much time covering the politics of the story and not enough time and space covering what the health care plan does and how it affects them. Let’s fix that.

The Washington Post has an easy-to-use tool that shows how the Act would affect you.

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Families USA releases statistics on number of Americans dying due to lack of health insurance

June 20, 2012, posted by Andrew Koch, WGMD News

 

With a Supreme Court decision on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act looming, Ron Pollack, the executive director of healthcare consumer advocacy group “Families USA,” was joined by Dick Woodruff, Vice President of Federal Relations for the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network, in a conference call to release statistics about just how many Americans die prematurely due to a lack of healthcare insurance. The numbers update the 2002 report on the same topic by the Institute of Medicine, “Care without Coverage: Too Little, Too Late,” and are based on statistics from the 2010 Census.

According to Families USA, 26,100 people between the ages of 25 and 64 died in 2010 due to a lack of health insurance. That number is up from 20,350 in 2005. In 2010, Vermont had the fewest number of deaths, with 28. California had the most, with almost 3,200, and was followed (in order) by Texas, Florida, New York and Georgia. Regionally, 398 people in Maryland between the ages of 25 and 64 died early due to a lack of healthcare coverage. Pollack pointed out that the numbers vary widely on a state-by-state basis because of the varying demographics of each state. Families USA says there are about 50 million people, or one out of every 6 Americans, who don’t have health insurance. Pollack says for them, the lack of health insurance is a very serious matter that can have “enormous” consequences. He says that for those unable to afford health insurance, the Affordable Care Act would be their only option if it’s allowed to be fully implemented in 2014.

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Health care ruling: Change to continue

Health care ruling: Change to continue | Politics & your health | Scoop.it

Transformation of the way Americans get medical care will continue, advocates say, regardless of which way the U.S. Supreme Court rules later this month on the Affordable Care Act.

 

 by Cliff Peale, cincinnati.com

 

Transformation of the way Americans get medical care will continue, advocates say, regardless of which way the U.S. Supreme Court rules later this month on the Affordable Care Act.

As the nation’s highest court considers the future of the landmark 2010 health care reform law pushed through by President Barack Obama, doctors, hospitals and other providers say they’re going to keep pushing for local reforms.

“Even if the Supreme Court blows the whole thing up, we believe the health care system will be transformed in ways most consumers can’t even imagine,” said Doug Spitler, president of Episcopal Retirement Homes, which operates nursing homes and other long-term care facilities in Ohio and serves about 1,300 people.

The ACA has cut Medicare payments to nursing homes by about 11 percent, Spitler said. He said, though, that it also has “spawned a lot of experimental work in the field.”Doctors and hospital administrators say the experiments they’ve started won’t end even if the Supreme Court invalidates the law.

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House GOP Blocking Abortion Access for Raped Soldiers

House GOP Blocking Abortion Access for Raped Soldiers | Politics & your health | Scoop.it

By Kate Sheppard

 

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) wants to expand access to abortion for servicewomen who are raped. Only a few Republicans are willing to help.

 

 Republican Senators John McCain, Scott Brown, and Susan Collins all support an effort by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, a Democrat from New Hampshire, to expand abortion access for military women who are raped. But despite bipartisan support in the Senate, Shaheen's proposal may not make it into the final version of the 2013 defense authorization bill—because House Republicans oppose it.

 

If Shaheen's measure passes, military families will finally have the same access to abortion that other federal employees already receive. Unlike the rest of the federal government, the Department of Defense currently only provides abortion coverage if the life of the mother is at stake. Under current law, if a State Department employee is raped, her government health insurance plan will pay for an abortion if she wants one. But if an Army medic serving in Afghanistan is raped and becomes pregnant, she can't use her military health plan to pay for an abortion. If she does decide to get an abortion, she will have to pay for it with her own money. And if she can't prove she was raped—which is difficult before an investigation is completed—she may have to look for services off base, which can be dangerous or impossible in many parts of the world.

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10 Things You Get Now That Obamacare Survived

10 Things You Get Now That Obamacare Survived | Politics & your health | Scoop.it

By Andy Kroll & Nick Baumann, Mother Jones

 

Your guide to the ways the Affordable Care Act impacts the lives of regular Americans.

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For-profit healthcare doesn't necessarily take better care of patients

For-profit healthcare doesn't necessarily take better care of patients | Politics & your health | Scoop.it
When developing countries try to boost their health care systems, people often advocate letting the free market take care of it. After all, isn't the private sector meant to be a model of efficiency compared to the public sector?
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Distaste for health care law reflects ad spending

Distaste for health care law reflects ad spending | Politics & your health | Scoop.it

About $235 million has gone to advertisements attacking the health care law, which most Americans want overturned, and $69 million to ads supporting it.

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

updated 6/21/2012 12:32:48 AM ET2012-06-21T04:32:48

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DOYLESTOWN, Pa. — Erika Losse is precisely the kind of person President Obama’s signature health care law is intended to help. She has no health insurance. She relies on her mother to buy her a yearly checkup as a Christmas gift, and she pays out of her own pocket for the rest of her medical care, including $1,250 for a recent ultrasound.

Other political news of note

Obama camp: We're going to be outspent Top Obama campaign officials today said they would be outspent by Mitt Romney and allies, especially when you include all the various outside groups.

House Republicans vote to cite Holder for contempt in 'Fast and Furious' scandal Contempt: Now what? With docket filling for the fall, high court looms over 2012 election NYT: Distaste for health care law reflects ad spending

But Ms. Losse, 33, a part-time worker at a bagel shop, is no fan of the law, which will require millions of uninsured Americans like herself to get health coverage by 2014. Never mind that Ms. Losse, who makes less than $35,000 a year, would probably qualify for subsidized insurance under the law.

“I’m positive I can’t afford it,” she said.

Story: Poll: Just 1 in 3 backs Obama health care law A Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of the health care law is expected any day now, but even if the Obama administration wins in the nation’s highest court, most evidence suggests it has lost miserably in the court of public opinion. National polls have consistently found the health care law has far more enemies than friends, including a recent New York Times/CBS News poll that found more than two-thirds of Americans hope the court will overturn some or all of it.

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The Supreme Court's Ruling on the Accountable ... - MTS Healthcare

The Supreme Court's Ruling on the Accountable ... - MTS Healthcare | Politics & your health | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court's Ruling on the Accountable Care Act and It's Impact Upon Healthcare Information Technology. Many people are anxiously waiting for the Supreme Court's ruling on the Accountable Care Act (often referred to as ...
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