Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Black officers talk of troubled times

Black officers talk of troubled times | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Using their roles within the department to educate and engage, black officers uncover why acknowledging differences, community policing and racial equity continue to be a priority at BCPD.
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Slain officer's life celebrated in emotional and solemn memorial service

Slain officer's life celebrated in emotional and solemn memorial service | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Hundreds of law enforcement officers from all over the country are expected to converge on El Cajon today for the second of two services for the San Diego police officer who was killed in the line of duty last wee
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Ex-Los Angeles Sheriff Hit With Stiffer Corruption Charges

Ex-Los Angeles Sheriff Hit With Stiffer Corruption Charges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ex-Los Angeles Sheriff Hit With Stiffer Corruption Charges
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To Innovate, Think Like a 19th-Century Barn Raiser

To Innovate, Think Like a 19th-Century Barn Raiser | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The barn-raising approach purposely and actively elevates community, connection, and a diversity of viewpoints above ideas and individuals. Too often, new initiatives – especially in big organizations – are developed through a series of inward-facing brainstorming sessions, which are designed to capture the core team’s thinking on the subject. Too often, proposals that look great in PowerPoint turn out to be unappealing, unhelpful, or unworkable to the people whom the success of an idea ultimately depends. And, even when brainstorming initiatives succeed in launching, those in charge of executing the ideas must build out external channels and support systems from scratch.

Pitfalls like these can largely be avoided with a simple ecosystem-focused approach – as farming communities knew in the 19th century, and as the Kickstarter and CGI communities know today. All it requires are a few steps anyone can follow.

Curate. Deliberately seek out different perspectives and actively explore them. In your curating, recruit the people who will be affected by your new product or service, and pay special attention to second order and even third order stakeholders. These stakeholders represent those who provide support services or add-ons to your products or services. This will help to ensure your perspective is ecosystem-based. Having the right people is more important than having the right idea.
Convene. Bring this curated group together – either in person or virtually via a platform – to connect, share ideas, share perspectives, and contribute their input to the initiative at hand.
Commit. Ask participants to commit something toward the initiative. This could be something as small as a bit of their time and attention. It could be introductions. It could be expertise. It could even be resources, partnerships, or funding. What each participant contributes will give you information on how they perceive your initiative’s effect on the greater ecosystem of which they are a part.
Cultivate. After the convening, continue to cultivate relationships with those who have contributed and committed to the initiative. They represent your initial ecosystem.
Repeat. Once you’ve raised and launched your initiative, periodically check back in with the community by hosting other barn-raising events. As you do so, your initiative will grow, and the ecosystem and connections will grow with it.
By adapting an ecosystem mindset, you will capture more than ideas. You will bind people, networks, and resources together. And if you get those elements right, your initiative will have a better chance of being successful.
Rob Duke's insight:
In my experience, this is what it takes to be successful long-term in policing.
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VIDEO: Woman Calls Police, after Being Pulled Over - Calibre Press

From the Houston Chronicle: A Houston social worker charged with resisting arrest in March says she feels lucky to be alive after a traffic stop turned into a physical confrontation with a Metro police officer and a two-day stint in jail. Earledreka White, 28, was handcuffed and arrested while talking to a 911 dispatcher, asking …
Rob Duke's insight:
The "I'm really confused" person is one of the "best" calls to ever go on....
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San Diego Police Announce Protocol On Video Release

San Diego Police Announce Protocol On Video Release | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The heads of police departments around the county have announced a protocol on when they will release video from officer-involved shootings. That makes San Diego the first county in the U.S. to have a single standard for police shooting videos.
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Miami Police Have Terrible Rules for Body Cameras, Civil Rights Groups Say

Miami Police Have Terrible Rules for Body Cameras, Civil Rights Groups Say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The study also faulted Miami Police for not protecting victims "from being recorded without informed consent," because department policies do not force cops to tell subjects when the cameras are rolling.
Rob Duke's insight:
Um? so we must record all the time, but not if the victim withholds permission....
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How zero-tolerance policing pits poor people against poor people

How zero-tolerance policing pits poor people against poor people | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Throughout my time on the corner, I marveled at the rigorous order the vendors maintained along the sidewalk. Of all the nearby activities they stepped in to regulate, none received a more concerted reproach than drug-related behavior. The vendors had become a powerful example of what urbanist Jane Jacobs famously called "eyes on the street." One afternoon, Jackson was sifting through a mound of wrinkled clothes in his baby stroller. I noticed that a small glass crack pipe had slid out of the pocket of a jacket that had been resting atop the other items. Keith, a round black vendor whom I had only met minutes earlier, saw me staring at the pipe and called Jackson over in a quiet voice: "You know you can't have that out here," he reprimanded in a hushed tone, gesturing behind Jackson toward the pipe. "Ain't no room for that out here." For the past year, Keith had tried to help Jackson get clean. He occasionally held onto Jackson's cash while they worked and constantly forbade him from "mixing business with pleasure."

As Keith lectured on, Jackson finally noticed the pipe. "Aw, shit," he said, clearly ashamed. He tried to reassure Keith. "I know, I know, I know. It's just, yeah, okay…I'll take care of it right now. Don't you worry. I got this."

Street vending allows even the most impoverished, addicted, and otherwise defeatist individuals a chance to "become innovators."
Jackson quickly walked back to the stroller, where he put on the jacket, shoved the pipe back in the pocket, and turned to me. "I go a run home real quick," he said. "Watch my stuff." Before I had a chance to respond, Jackson started walking in the direction of his SRO. He returned a half hour later without his jacket and, I assumed, without the pipe. Thus began a regular pattern in which Jackson would "run home" to "talk to Leticia" or "check on something" most days. In the lead-up to excusing himself, Jackson tended to grow irritable toward me and his fellow vendors and customers. He always returned noticeably energized, talkative.

But in a few months Jackson began to curb his addiction, and I realized that returning to the corner meant that he had to leave his stash and pipe back home. It meant that he was able to separate himself, if only for the duration of the day, from the dealers and addicts he complained were fixtures at his SRO building. It meant surrounding himself with vendors who not only demanded abstinence on the job, but who stepped in at the first glimpse of drug paraphernalia.

As conflicted as I felt about possibly enabling his addiction, I also realized that holding Jackson's place on the corner also helped maintain his exposure to what Princeton sociologist Mitchell Duneier, in his ethnography of street vendors in New York's City's Greenwich Village, calls the "rehabilitative forces of the sidewalk." According to Duneier, vending allows even the most impoverished, addicted, and otherwise defeatist individuals the opportunity to "become innovators—earning a living, striving for self-respect, establishing good relations with fellow citizens, providing support for each other."
Rob Duke's insight:
This work is a great example of how a formal vertical authority can encourage horizontal control in "the shadow of the law".  These street vendors aren't exactly legal, but they fill a need both economically and socially...
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Korryn Gaines is the ninth black woman shot and killed by police this year

Korryn Gaines is the ninth black woman shot and killed by police this year | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Baltimore County police shot mother, as 5-year-old son was in her arms. Police say she was also holding a shotgun.
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Tallahassee Police to answer all calls in pairs

Tallahassee Police to answer all calls in pairs | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Tallahassee Police Department makes changes for safety.
Rob Duke's insight:
Response times and costs will now increase in many big cities....
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How to Create an Exponential Mindset

How to Create an Exponential Mindset | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Build: Courage and Patience
These days, many companies are able to get through the launch phase with an exponential mindset. They manage their uncertainty, take the leap, and start the journey despite being unable to see around the bend. Fear of disruption and envy of unicorns can be a powerful motivator. But then something happens. Or more precisely, something doesn’t happen.

Take a look at the chart above. In the first part of the build phase, you don’t see a lot of change. It’s not until the second part when the line starts to bend. It’s simply the nature of exponential change. Things happen very slowly before they happen very quickly. If this was the only world we knew, it wouldn’t be a problem. But we were raised with an incremental mindset. So we can’t help but compare the exponential path to the incremental path. And this creates a problem.

We are accustomed to measuring progress linearly and incrementally. If 30% of the time has gone by, we assume that we should be 30% of the way there. That’s how things work in the physical world when we are traveling to a destination. But exponential models don’t work that way.

What happens is that businesses run into something I call the “expectation gap,” where the exponential strategy is at greatest risk from the incremental mindset. It’s where many companies abandon the exponential model for the incremental.

I see this consistently on a micro scale in my own work. My workshops are designed with an exponential mindset to generate new ways of thinking about marketing, culture and strategy. Somewhere around a third of the way into a workshop, the leader invariably says something like “so when are we going to get something done?” The reason is that they are still operating with an incremental mindset. A third of the time has passed, but it seems like they are only 10% of the way to our destination. In fact, most of the progress happens once the curve starts to bend. Invariably by the end of the day the same people are remarking that they can’t believe how much we got done in such a short period of time.

In your exponential journey, pay attention to when people get the most impatient for results. It’s the point in the chart where there is the largest gap between incremental and exponential paths. This expectation gap is a risk to the business strategy because the impatience can be used by opponents or skeptics to convince stakeholders to jump from the exponential to the incremental. You will have the immediate relief of having “line of sight” once again and see steady progress. But you will also have given up the possibility of accelerating returns and the opportunity to keep up with customers and competitors. The exponential mindset helps you have the courage to persevere and the patience to see it through.

Grow: Agility and Control
In the third phase, you have managed the uncertainty of the early days, the impatience of the middle phase, and now you are firmly “in the curve.” Growth is happening faster than you can handle. At this point, the incremental mindset is to try to rein things in and get things under control. But that would be a mistake. To sustain the accelerating returns, you need to shift your mindset about how to mobilize and manage resources.

The incremental mindset assumes that it takes more inputs to produce more outputs. So as growth starts to accelerate, teams start to look for more resources in proportion to the growth. But the addition of too many people or too many resources can “flood the engine” of growth. You need an exponential mindset to figure out how 1X additional input can create 10X additional output.

You also need to apply an exponential mindset to how you manage the resources you have. The incremental mindset about management is like creating a line of dominos. Everything needs to be highly coordinated with active oversight to make progress one step at a time. The exponential mindset is like this demonstration with ping pong balls in which things happen in parallel with a focus on the interactions among participants.

As I’ve written about separately, there is a way to let go without losing control. In the exponential mindset, managers replace control of people with control of principles. The use of doctrine to guide decision-making generates alignment, consistency and empowerment. But most leaders are accustomed to making decisions rather than empowering decisions. The anxiety from a loss of control can easily push companies off the exponential path back onto the incremental path. The exponential mindset helps to grow output faster than input, and empower teams to achieve both alignment and autonomy.

To summarize, digital business models require a shift from incremental to exponential. At the start, it takes vision and a leap of faith to commit to the unknown. In the early days, it takes courage and patience to build the foundation for growth even when results aren’t yet apparent. When growth kicks in, agility comes from empowering others and letting go without losing control. In all of the stages, the challenge is to “unlearn” familiar ways of thinking and embrace the unfamiliar. But with a shift from the incremental to exponential mindset comes the opportunity for real innovation.
Rob Duke's insight:
This idea of the Exponential Mindset is just in time for the type of change we need within law enforcement.  Instead of thinking about the way the mission has been accomplished in the last 100 years, we need to take some risks.  For one, we need to examine the underpinnings of professionalism.  When Woodrow Wilson arrived at the Politics-Administration Dichotomy, we were trying to find a remedy for political influence of law enforcement (and government).  Because of this, we set up barriers where the police outside influence.  Even Community Policing, which is supposedly built on community input, reserves most major decisions for the police administrators, which nearly always produces incremental change.  Egon Bittner has gone so far to suggest that the velvet glove of community policing merely hides the "iron fist" of policing.  I think he's right.  If we change our foundational beliefs (about professional policing being insulated from outside control), with an ethical model, I think we'd see these type of exponential returns on investment.

What does that mean?  We now rely on professionalism and discretion to find what we find to be reasonable in most cases under the rule of law.  I know you're thinking that that seems like a pretty good model, but the problem is that it creates a mindset where I can choose to enforce the law and I choose which laws to enforce.  There's a certain pragmatism in that it is the cops who are enforcing the law at 2 A.M., so they are the practical "deciders".  Which, frankly, is all the entire Justice system does is decide....I heard a judge last month tell a class this stark reality.  She said: "we don't find the truth and we don't deliver justice.  We're deciders.  We have a set of rules for sorting through all kinds of information and then we decide based upon what's left." (my paraphrasing).   At least the courts have rules so that they can defend their decisions, but the police are more "seat of the pants", which looks capricious and sometimes malicious.  It also contributes, as I said, to real and imagined cases of abuse and corruption.  Sometimes that corruption is for a noble-cause (in our minds) to correct the injustices that we think arise within the legal system, but the community doesn't always see these the same way as the police.

So, when I advocate Exponential Thinking what do I mean?  First, we need to build on an ethical model that searches for reasonableness and human dignity (see my mentor, Chet Newland for more on that); but not willy-nilly without rules.  That's why I put Nas, Price, and Weber in the readings.  I think they've hit on a brilliant set of standards for determining when to set aside rules/law/policy.  1. when this case would result in clear injustice for this individual; 2. when, as a whole, a group has little understanding for, or a lack of access to the levers of powers and thus cannot defend their position or assert their interests in the legal/political arena (clearly this is only for the Mala Prohibita laws that we pass to uphold dominant norms not the Mala Per Se laws, which themselves are built on the universal laws, such as "thou shalt not kill").; and/or, 3. When community norms have moved more quickly than have laws.

This ethical stance now opens both the micro discretion to more flexibility; but also means that we have the ability to respond to more direct community control with our own set of foundational principles that limit the extent to which a corrupt element might attempt to hijack the justice system for its own purposes.

With this foundation in place, now we can adopt the soft power principles outlined in the readings by Joseph Nye.

Summary:
Change ethics to allow discretion under conditions when we can make findings that individual, group, or systemic injustice has been improved in some fashion by not enforcing the law.  This allows us to build community capacity so that the community truly controls its police.  What this captures is that hidden social energy that now is largely used to resist (or at least question) police activities.....And, that's where the Exponential returns/improvements will be realized.

Let me know what you think.
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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 27, 2016 2:08 PM
Summary:
Using Joseph Nye's idea of Soft Power that attracts and builds on the Social Energy of consensus, we can capture the power of the Exponential Mindset without the dangers of returning to the partisan politics of the early 1900's.  To do this, we also need an ethical system that is greater than: use discretion to find justice.  The problem with discretion is that it's a slippery slope and soon becomes easy to ignore any rule/law/policy that we don't like.  Instead, Nas, Price, Weber (see below) offer a 3-prong set of rules that could allow discretion without jeopardizing the entire system and exposing it to corrupting (or at least the accusation of corruption).

This idea of the Exponential Mindset is just in time for the type of change we need within law enforcement. Instead of thinking about the way the mission has been accomplished in the last 100 years, we need to take some risks. For one, we need to examine the underpinnings of professionalism. When Woodrow Wilson arrived at the Politics-Administration Dichotomy, we were trying to find a remedy for political influence of law enforcement (and government). Because of this, we set up barriers where the police outside influence. Even Community Policing, which is supposedly built on community input, reserves most major decisions for the police administrators, which nearly always produces incremental change. Egon Bittner has gone so far to suggest that the velvet glove of community policing merely hides the "iron fist" of policing. I think he's right. If we change our foundational beliefs (about professional policing being insulated from outside control), with an ethical model, I think we'd see these type of exponential returns on investment. What does that mean? We now rely on professionalism and discretion to find what we find to be reasonable in most cases under the rule of law. I know you're thinking that that seems like a pretty good model, but the problem is that it creates a mindset where I can choose to enforce the law and I choose which laws to enforce. There's a certain pragmatism in that it is the cops who are enforcing the law at 2 A.M., so they are the practical "deciders". Which, frankly, is all the entire Justice system does is decide....I heard a judge last month tell a class this stark reality. She said: "we don't find the truth and we don't deliver justice. We're deciders. We have a set of rules for sorting through all kinds of information and then we decide based upon what's left." (my paraphrasing). At least the courts have rules so that they can defend their decisions, but the police are more "seat of the pants", which looks capricious and sometimes malicious. It also contributes, as I said, to real and imagined cases of abuse and corruption. Sometimes that corruption is for a noble-cause (in our minds) to correct the injustices that we think arise within the legal system, but the community doesn't always see these the same way as the police. So, when I advocate Exponential Thinking what do I mean? First, we need to build on an ethical model that searches for reasonableness and human dignity (see my mentor, Chet Newland for more on that); but not willy-nilly without rules. That's why I put Nas, Price, and Weber in the readings. I think they've hit on a brilliant set of standards for determining when to set aside rules/law/policy. 1. when this case would result in clear injustice for this individual; 2. when, as a whole, a group has little understanding for, or a lack of access to the levers of powers and thus cannot defend their position or assert their interests in the legal/political arena (clearly this is only for the Mala Prohibita laws that we pass to uphold dominant norms not the Mala Per Se laws, which themselves are built on the universal laws, such as "thou shalt not kill").; and/or, 3. When community norms have moved more quickly than have laws. This ethical stance now opens both the micro discretion to more flexibility; but also means that we have the ability to respond to more direct community control with our own set of foundational principles that limit the extent to which a corrupt element might attempt to hijack the justice system for its own purposes. With this foundation in place, now we can adopt the soft power principles outlined in the readings by Joseph Nye. Summary: Change ethics to allow discretion under conditions when we can make findings that individual, group, or systemic injustice has been improved in some fashion by not enforcing the law. This allows us to build community capacity so that the community truly controls its police. What this captures is that hidden social energy that now is largely used to resist (or at least question) police activities..... Let me know what you think.
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BODYCAM: Officer Rescues Wounded Woman & 3 Children Under Gunfire - Calibre Press

From the Volusia County Sheriffs Department: The two adults involved in today’s domestic violence-related shooting are as follows: Victim:           Victoria Rosado, age 26 Defendant:     Emmanuel Rosado, age 26 (DOB: 6/4/90) Based on statements from the victim as well as one of the children who witnessed the shooting, the investigation has concluded that the defendant shot his wife …
Rob Duke's insight:
Chances are that whichever direction the cops are running, it's good advice to run the opposite way....These officers run into the maw of the beast to rescue the mom and 3 kids.
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Top cop Q&A: Are Newark police really reforming?

Top cop Q&A: Are Newark police really reforming? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new FRONTLINE documentary casts a shadow of doubt on whether or not the Newark Police Department will be able to truly reform in accordance with a federal mandate to do so. 

But, the city's top cop says the questions highlighted in the film got it all wrong.

"We already are," Newark Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose said of when the force will change to address issues brought up in the documentary.

In a one-on-one interview with NJ Advance Media, Ambrose said the questions highlighted by the documentary, "Policing the Police," which debuted on PBS last month, are already being addressed. And, although he acknowledged that changes -- which were initiated by a U.S. Department of Justice report condemning police behavior -- are still in the midst of happening, he echoed Mayor Ras Baraka's comments that PBS missed the mark.

"The show gave no justice to what we are doing," Ambrose said.
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Blue ribbons decorate Coalinga in support of law enforcement

Blue ribbons decorate Coalinga in support of law enforcement | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The event was to show local police officers and their chief that the city of Coalinga stands with them in a time when tensions are running high across the country.
Rob Duke's insight:
My old stomping grounds: tri-cities, Avenal, Coalinga, and Huron.
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Video of Fatal Shooting Shows Chicago Officers Firing at Car

Video of Fatal Shooting Shows Chicago Officers Firing at Car | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The footage was recovered from police body and dashboard cameras.
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California lawmakers move toward limiting police seizures of property without a criminal conviction

California lawmakers move toward limiting police seizures of property without a criminal conviction | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Major law enforcement groups and state Sen. Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles) have reached a deal on legislation to limit police in California from permanently seizing property without a conviction
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Police video cameras can be a game-changer — if they're working

Police video cameras can be a game-changer — if they're working | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chicago police have expanded the use of dashboard and body video cameras. That's good. Now make sure they use them.
Rob Duke's insight:
I outfitted my department with Motorola's lapel cameras when they first emerged in about 2006.  I made wearing them optional and most officers readily checked them out for use (who wouldn't want a recording of controversial calls?).  Motorola is a great company and always does a great job engineering their radios and computers, but despite this reputation, fully half of the body cameras had failed within a year.  In the political climate of 2006-2007, that was no big deal, but today any of of those failures would certainly be viewed as "the officer turning of the camera to cover up wrongdoing".  The reality is that electronics don't do well when toss around or made to be wet.  The life of the beat cop is rough and tumble.  Hope they're making them tougher these days.
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Trump vs. Hillary. Battle of the signs. Social Experiment

I held a I love Hillary sign in front of the Republican convention. Then I held a I love Trump sign in front of the Democratic convention. Follow me o
Rob Duke's insight:
I try to stay away from the blatant political posts, but I think this one is interesting because this is similar to what cops face...you can be doing something accepted by mainstream society but called out for ridicule by some groups.
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Denver City Council considering move to strengthen police watchdog

Denver City Council considering move to strengthen police watchdog | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Safety and Well-Being Committee will hold a discussion and accept public comment on securing the monitor’s office within the city charter.
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BODYCAM: Deadly Ariz. OIS of Woman Armed with Scissors - Calibre Press

From AZCentral.com: Body-camera footage released by the city of Winslow on Wednesday shows the seconds leading up to the fatal shooting of a 27-year-old Navajo woman by a Winslow police officer, with the woman advancing toward the officer with a pair of silver scissors in her left hand. The video footage from March 27 shows the encounter between Loreal …
Rob Duke's insight:
New info emerges on this Officer Involved Shooting (OIS): the suspect had scissors and was threatening the officer with them.  The law can't require someone to be "brave" in these situations and we teach officers not to be "John Wayne" or have "Tombstone" courage, but the community is demanding that officers use more restraint: What do you think?

**Tombstone courage=like Wyatt Earp, but we might also write those words on your tombstone...it's a way to make officers be smarter about the danger they accept on a routine basis.
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NYPD Top Cop Bill Bratton Resigns, Critics Say Good Riddance

NYPD Top Cop Bill Bratton Resigns, Critics Say Good Riddance | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After a long and storied career in law enforcement, New York City police Commissioner Bill Bratton on Tuesday announced his resignation.
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Loreal Tsingine Shooting: Navajo Woman’s Death By Police Under Scrutiny By Feds

Loreal Tsingine Shooting: Navajo Woman’s Death By Police Under Scrutiny By Feds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
According to the Associated Press, Officer Austin Shipley shot Loreal Tsingine on March 27 in the small town of Winslow, Arizona, just outside the Navajo Nation reservation. The Justice Department says its civil rights division will review the investigation made by local authorities, which concluded that Shipley was justified in the shooting and would not be charged.
Rob Duke's insight:
There's video, but it only shows the altercation and not the shooting.  It looks like she's zombie-like (maybe under the influence of PCP.  If so, their perceptions slow down and they can become agitated and fearful.  Once that happens, they can become violent, seem impervious to pain, and have super-human strength.  The best way to deal with PCP induced violence/resistance is to back off and try to calm the person...but that's easy to Monday-morning quarterback).
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Fla. Police Mistook Krispy Kreme Doughnut Glaze for Meth

Fla. Police Mistook Krispy Kreme Doughnut Glaze for Meth | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An Orlando man who was arrested after police officers mistook Krispy Kreme doughnut glaze for crystal meth has been cleared.

Daniel Frederick Rushing, 64, was arrested on a possession of methamphetamin
Rob Duke's insight:
And now, for something completely different....

Here's the Monty Python skit to go with that in case I'm too old...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGK8IC-bGnU
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Lydia Weiss's comment, August 2, 2016 2:45 AM
Do I really need to make the obvious joke that's up in the air here? I can't help but wonder if the person writing this article was trying to not laugh. I would probably be seeking damages from the city as well if I got caught in that predicament, but as an outsider I can't help but chuckle a bit.
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Freddie Gray case: Charges against three remaining officers dropped

Freddie Gray case: Charges against three remaining officers dropped | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Prosecutors dropped all remaining charges against three Baltimore police officers accused in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in a downtown courtroom on
Rob Duke's insight:
Not unexpected, but there's many who will be unhappy by this turn of events.  Mr. Gray's case was far from perfect in the first place.  See earlier stories for how he contributed to his own demise.
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Houston man armed with pellet gun shot after ignoring police

Houston man armed with pellet gun shot after ignoring police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Houston man was shot multiple times by police after ignoring orders and reaching for a pellet gun in his waistband, cops said.
Rob Duke's insight:
This type of call has no winners.  It places officers in an impossible situation....
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