Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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NAACP partners with city police for community listening session

NAACP partners with city police for community listening session | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The city’s Illumination Project was launched last September to gain input from the community to find long-term solutions to strengthening the public perception of police. Since launching the initiative, the Charleston Police Department has participated in a series of listening sessions to hear suggestions and concerns from citizens. The information gathered from these meetings will be collected and analyzed by researchers at the College of Charleston’s Joseph P. Riley Jr. Center for Livable Communities, but Charleston Police Chief Greg Mullen says a few changes have already been put in place based on public input.

“We’ve heard a lot about getting more information out. We are now putting our policies online. We’ve done that as a result of what we’ve heard in the community,” said Mullen. “We’ve also started what we’re calling Policing 101, which is a condensed educational process. We’ve heard loud and clear that the community needs to know more about what the police do, what are our procedures, how do we respond to certain things.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's an example of micro processes to solicit more community participation in policing...
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Amina Terry's comment, September 19, 2016 2:39 AM
I think this is a good idea because it would bring the citizens closer to the police. I think recently the police officers have gotten such a bad reputation that all the good things they do is ignored on purpose. I think this is beneficial for both parties because we have never had this type of scheduled meetings to talk about concerns. This could improve communications and allow the citizens to be more involved.
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 2016 5:00 PM
Me too. As Ron Claassen is fond of saying: "agreements made, and kept, build trust"....
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Other passenger in van to testify for defense in Freddie Gray trial

Other passenger in van to testify for defense in Freddie Gray trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The man who was in the back of the police van with Freddie Gray on the day of his arrest has been called to testify for the defense of Officer William Porter, according to court documents.
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 14, 2016 7:57 PM
It is interesting to see that the other passenger is just now being called upon at this point in the case where you would normally suspect that a witness with such close proximity would be one of the first individuals to be called upon as a witness to this case. Now his testimony may be biased since he was also arrested or he may have been bribed to say certain things that would not convict the officers. It is more surprising that with all the technology today there was not a security camera placed in the back of the van to monitor the detainees.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 2016 8:24 PM
Yeah, there's some weirdness going on here too. It was reported at one point that Freddy may have revealed to him an intent to injure himself or fake an injury, but now we're not hearing that claim. Just one of many reasons why no one knows quite what to believe.
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A posse of steely retirees patrols the streets of Arizona

A posse of steely retirees patrols the streets of Arizona | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The looming elections worry Mr Isho. Though he believes the posse system would survive a change of sheriff, he fears that a new boss might reduce the volunteers’ powers: “castrating the programme”, as he puts it with some vehemence. The next sheriff might not feel that civilian volunteers should carry guns, and Mr Isho, for one, would not put on the uniform if he were not armed. A police uniform is a “magnet for trouble”, he explains gravely.

Encountered at the headquarters of the Arizona Republican Party in Phoenix, Mr Arpaio agrees that he has built up the role of the posse. He is proud of sending members out on raids to help catch criminals. “I don’t just send the posse out to rescue horses.” As it happens, Paul Penzone, a veteran Phoenix police detective trying to unseat Mr Arpaio as sheriff, calls himself a “huge fan” of the posse, which he would not disarm. “This is Arizona. This is a state with a lot of gun-owners,” he notes tactfully.

Still, he would make changes. The posse does not reflect the diversity of the county, which is almost one-third Hispanic. He says he has too often seen the posse, in common with county chain gangs, deployed on high-visibility missions in the most affluent bits of the county, where Arpaio-voters are thickest on the ground. Mr Penzone, who is running as a Democrat, would rather see extra patrols in public parks where children cannot play safely. Above all, he says: “I’m not going to send the posse to fly to Hawaii to investigate the president’s birth certificate.”
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 14, 2016 8:12 PM
This can be easily debatable from a wide view of angles, first off this is how community policing should be. If every city, county and state had this amount of dedicated volunteers the crime rate would drop over night. The community should be involved in the safety of ours and the safety of themselves no matter what age. We need to accept that this era of America's history is a very dangerous time where you are likely to get shot for just walking down the wrong street. Now with that being said you can not just have any individual carrying a gun and a badge, there needs to be proper training and selections done to decide who should be apart of such a group. Safety is a big issue and not just anyone can do it.
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LA Mayor nominates social change advocate to police commission

Mayor Eric Garcetti said Monday that he had nominated Shane Murphy Goldsmith to the five-person Police Commission. Goldsmith would fill a seat being vacated by Kathleen Kim, an attorney and law professor who focuses on immigrant rights, and has served on the panel since 2013.
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The Black Body Count Rises as Chicago Police Step Back

The Black Body Count Rises as Chicago Police Step Back | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Heather Mac Donald writes that in 2016 nearly 3,000 people have been shot Chicago, an average of one victim every two hours.
Rob Duke's insight:
The Coase Theorem at work: Assign the property rights (police power) wherever you wish and the market will work out the most efficient solution--you may not like it, but it will.
Is it coincidence that the gangs are taking over Chicago's streets?
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Reward tops $25,000 in shooting death of Shelby police officer

Reward tops $25,000 in shooting death of Shelby police officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SHELBY, NC (WBTV) -
The reward for information now tops $25,000 for information after a Shelby police officer died from his injuries after he was shot while serving a warrant early Saturday morning.

Shelby Police Officer Tim Brackeen was attempting to serve a warrant for 23-year-old Irving Fenner, Jr. in the area of Parkview Street, when Fenner allegedly shot Brackeen in the torso early Saturday morning.

Officials say Brackeen passed away Monday morning at Carolinas Medical Center, in Charlotte.

It is with a heavy heart that I send this release," Shelby Police Chief Jeff Ledford wrote in a statement. "Today at 11:42am Officer Tim Brackeen passed away at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte due to the injuries he received from the shooting on Saturday, September 10, 2016."

"At this time our department asks for everyone to keep Officer Brackeen’s family and the entire department in their thoughts and prayers," Ledford continued.

Ledford and other officers set up a makeshift memorial, putting blue ribbons and a wreath on Brackeen's squad car.

Throughout the afternoon and evening, neighbors placed flowers on the car to pay their respects.

"He was out here just trying to do his job, and we love the law enforcement officers," said Annie Harris, as she fought back tears.
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Linda Darnell's comment, September 13, 2016 11:52 AM
This a classic situation that illustrates how power can produce an awful result. I believe that the person responsible for shooting the officer was in part reacting to the lack of power and control he had at the present time considering the potentially heavy consequences the warrant can produce. His shooting of the officer could've been him acting out against what he perceived as lack of control and since the officer represented the power over him he sadly became the target.
Tyler Hytry's comment, September 16, 2016 11:00 PM
It is always unfortunate when these things happen. The individual was definitely reacting to the lack of control over the situation and just reacted with fear over what might happen to him, especially with what the warrant might have brought to light. This could be brought down to the reputation police have, they can easily frighten people and individuals that are hiding something can do things like this as a result of that fear.
Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 18, 2016 10:18 PM
This is another story that is played out far too often lately. I understand that he might have been reacting to his lack of power of control but that does not give someone the right to assault and ultimately kill someone. I was not there and do not know the entire story but there are ways to react and deal with a lack of control and this is not the correct way.
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Santa Clara Officers Condemn Kaepernick Protest, Threaten To Boycott Policing Levi's Stadium

Santa Clara Officers Condemn Kaepernick Protest, Threaten To Boycott Policing Levi's Stadium | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The union for police officers who work home games for the 49ers says its members may boycott policing the stadium if the team doesn't discipline Colin Kaepernick,
Rob Duke's insight:
Everybody's just exercising their rights....
Nobody has learned that life is a team sport....
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Bethany M's comment, September 12, 2016 7:41 PM


Honestly, I think obsessing over Kaepernick not standing for the flag is ridiculous. EVEN as a military spouse I feel this way. I understand that the flag is symbolic, and what it stands for. However, to obsess over an inanimate object seems really silly to me. I’d really just like to ask these individuals to ignore it like they do climate change, world hunger, species extinction, fresh water contamination, habitat destruction, amazon deforestation, etc. In my opinion, there are far more important things to spend my time obsessing and worrying about. At the end of the day, the flag is an inanimate object and there ARE more important things to stress about. You don’t have to agree with his actions, and you can believe they are disrespectful while simultaneously choosing not to obsess over it. Whether you like it or not, our military did not die to force people to stand for the anthem. This is a free country and our military died protecting the right to sit OR stand. As for the police officers who are refusing to police the stadium over the actions of a single individual, shame on them.
Tyler Hytry's comment, September 16, 2016 10:50 PM
Interesting I had heard about the incident of Kaepernick refusing to stand for the anthem, but accusing officers of murdering people. I know that there have been some unfortunate situations involving police officers and colored people recently as there has always seem to have been, but not all officers have the same mind set. Overall I don't think that this is something that should have been taken personally by the officers of Santa Clara, Kaepernick is just exercising his rights.
Leah Haskell's comment, September 18, 2016 2:53 AM
I wonder if the cops are going to boycott women's soccer as well. This is an example of cops trying to exercise their power. They think they have enough power to demand punishment for a NFL player who has the right to kneel in exchange for their services. Their job is to protect their community, if the incident is causing issues why would they leave their community to fight for themselves.
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http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/2016/0910/Why-two-police-departments-stopped-using-body-cameras

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UP Police launch Twitter-based grievance redressal service

UP Police launch Twitter-based grievance redressal service | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Uttar Pradesh Police are launching a Twitter-based grievances redressal service, the first such initiative by any police force in the country.
“UP will be the first state in the country, where Twitter will be used at all its police stations to redress grievances of people and to have better connect with them (people),” additional superintendent of police, DGP office, Rahul Srivastava said, adding that such a service was launched in Bengaluru earlier but it was for a limited area.
Srivastava said the service was a Twitter-based customer relation management platform where, through a software, complaints would be forwarded to concerned districts a serial code will be generated for a complaint. “(The code) will also help the command centre (in Lucknow) to know about the status of complaints with the click of a mouse.”
With a view to have a better connect with people and help them air their grievances and also to keep a tab on the action taken by the police, DGP Javeed Ahmad had issued directives to all the police stations to open Twitter accounts.
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's a great idea from India.  This sounds similar to the process we used with Zen Desk.
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The FTO's Role: "I've Got You on Camera!" - Calibre Press

We’ve spoken previously on the “3 Dominoes of Field Training,” in which we recognize that a failure to perform can be traced back to a lack of self-confidence.  In the past, officers would act with good faith, and if things didn’t go to plan, they had the opportunity to explain themselves and the process they went through.  Now, however, cellphone footage is being posted and Monday morning quarterbacked before the officer is putting her report on paper.

The incident can be reviewed frame by frame—with personal bias, assumptions, and perceptions tossed in to the mix from all corners of the globe. Knowing this, the sight of a camera or the announcement that an officer is being recorded can cause hesitation, second-guessing, or the use of ‘kid gloves’ with actively resistant or aggressive suspects.

And the public knows this.

When your detainee’s wife screams that you’re being recorded, she isn’t hoping that you’ll straighten your gig line or use “please” and “thank you.”  She’s hoping that you’ll doubt your actions, hesitate, make an error, and give her husband the opportunity to escape, evade, or attack.

Unfortunately, hesitancy on the officers’ part can cause a flare of self-confidence on the suspect’s.  It gives them time to plan, think, and act—a luxury we can’t allow someone who is trying to hurt or evade us.  How do we overcome this moment?
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Troopers: Man shoots police officer in Chevak, then kills himself

Troopers: Man shoots police officer in Chevak, then kills himself | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man in the Western Alaska village of Chevak shot and wounded a police officer Wednesday evening before committing suicide, according to Alaska State Troopers.
Rob Duke's insight:
Prayers for the VPSO....
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Ferguson activist Darren Seals found fatally shot in burning car - Charpolice

Ferguson activist Darren Seals found fatally shot in burning car   - Charpolice | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Wen Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer two years ago, Darren Seals was one of the most vocal activists leading protests across the city From Charpolice
Rob Duke's insight:
Not good for anyone...
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Graphic This Is Why You Shoot Someone Advancing With A Knife

Graphic This Is Why You Shoot Someone Advancing With A Knife | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

All too often people like to question why cops use lethal force against people armed with only a knife. This video is the answer.
Rob Duke's insight:
Warning: Very graphic.  One guy with a knife takes on 5 cops.  Kills 2 before they can begin firing at him.

This is why we shoot.
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 8, 2016 1:31 AM
Should have just used a taser.just kidding. This video should be played over and over to reinforce the 21' rule and just how dangerous a knife can really be. Scary business.
Rob Duke's comment, September 8, 2016 2:58 AM
Yeah, tasers have been a game changer. Saved me from shooting a few times.
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New Report Finds Strong Potential for Foot Patrol as a Policing Change Agent

New Report Finds Strong Potential for Foot Patrol as a Policing Change Agent | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Arguably, nothing is more important in policing today than gaining and holding the trust of the community, particularly those most affected by crime and violence. Today, the Police Foundation, with generous support from the Charles Koch Foundation, is releasing a new report that provides real-life examples and optimism for how foot patrol can help law enforcement officers and agencies reconnect and build strong, mutually supportive relationships with their communities.
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 18, 2016 10:08 PM
I like to see stories like this talking about ways that police can relate to the communities they serve. I often conduct foot patrols in the villages I work in and I often stop and talk to people and I think it is good to talk to people when it is not law enforcement related. I am guilty of being in a hurry and not taking the time to visit or interact with the community members.
Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 18, 2016 10:09 PM
I also think this type of behavior can add to the legitimacy the police.
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Timeline: The Freddie Gray Investigation - Baltimore Sun

Timeline: The Freddie Gray Investigation - Baltimore Sun | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Six police officers were charged in the death of Freddie Gray, a man that died in police custody on April 19, 2015.
Rob Duke's insight:
Older news this year, but relevant to the course.  See July: Prosecutor attempts to withhold evidence that Mr. Gray tried to injure himself during an earlier arrest.  This is probably where the prosecution begins to unravel....
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3 Phoenix police officers injured after car hits them, crashes into gas station

3 Phoenix police officers injured after car hits them, crashes into gas station | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three Phoenix police officers were injured after a car crashed into a gas station early Tuesday morning.  
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Sober as a Judge; Drunk as a Lawyer

Sober as a Judge; Drunk as a Lawyer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Whoever is suffering with addictions can be helped by your intervention. Help is available and that the sooner someone intervenes, the better.
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 14, 2016 8:20 PM
I personally think that this level of alcohol and drug consumption in lawyers is due to high stress, case work, and the mental affecting of having to deal with the cases of others. Seeing criminals get off free or simply receiving a low level sentence can have a burden upon the mind creating such negative habits as alcohol abuse and other substance abuse.
Austyn Hewitt's comment, September 18, 2016 7:23 PM
If I was a lawyer I would probably drink too. Their jobs are so stressful because if they lose a case the person can go to prison even if they shouldn't. Should drinking be a method of coping? No, and I think that if anyone has an issue they should get help but I can definitely see why they drink as a way to de-stress themselves.
Amina Terry's comment, September 19, 2016 2:45 AM
Being a lawyer would be a stressful job and some may be lucky enough to find other outlets but alcohol is easily accessible and you don't necessarily need to cut time out of your day to drink which is convenient in a way. Lawyers and police officers are both tough jobs and I think they just do best they can with what they got. Police officers are known for their donuts and after-duty-beer at a bar near work because they don't have time to stop by a restaurant and eat and at the end of the day, day just want to relax. I have had drink after a "tough day" in a business setting. I can't imagine what their tough day is.
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NYPD's Bratton Says: War on Terror may never end....

NYPD's Bratton Says: War on Terror may never end.... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Even so, Bratton said on CNN’s “New Day Sunday,” the possibility of another attack remains high. ADVERTISEMENT | ADVERTISE ON NEWSDAY “Not necessarily in the near term,” he said. “But this is not something that is going to end today, next month or next year.” Bratton said “the enabling, the inspiring, the directing” of terrorists since the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, surfaced, “have made this a very different set of initiatives that policing, and certainly federal government law enforcement, has to deal with.” Asked if there were any current threats to New York City, Bratton said there were none.
Rob Duke's insight:
We can't start accepting this stance.  Even the IRA was converted to a political party....
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Calgary Police Officer Presented With Minister of Justice Award for His Work With Indigenous Youth

Calgary Police Officer Presented With Minister of Justice Award for His Work With Indigenous Youth | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND--(Marketwired - Sept. 10, 2016) - Department of Justice Canada Every day, police officers across the country interact with youth who have been in conflict with the law. Canada's youth justice legislation, the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), gives police officers the tools they need t
Rob Duke's insight:
Awards for this kind of behavior are a good idea since it may improve this officer's chances for promotion.  Right now you need to be a drug team member or maybe on SWAT.  But, it's important to promote the Restorative officer.
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Linda Darnell's comment, September 13, 2016 11:49 AM
It is situations like this that foster trust between the community and the police officer, and it encourages the officer to utilize the power he is given in a way that benefits himself and his community.
Tyler Hytry's comment, September 16, 2016 11:04 PM
This is a pretty good example of community style policing, getting to know the community, building relationships, and creating a better image.
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Residents Air Grievances About Law Enforcement Conduct

Residents Air Grievances About Law Enforcement Conduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The forum in Lancaster, convened by the Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission, was the first of six that will be held throughout the county as part of a review of police and community relations launched last year on the 50th anniversary of the Watts riots. The agreement between the county and federal officials was approved a year and a half ago and requires the department to collect more data on stops and searches to determine whether minorities are being disproportionately targeted. It also set new rules for deputies, including barring the practice of routinely detaining people in the back seat of patrol cars.
Rob Duke's insight:
Share your insight
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Linda Darnell's comment, September 13, 2016 11:53 AM
This article illustrates the concept that even though the police have the power, they are given the power by the community and when the community feels they are abusing that power or slacking on their job, they can pull together to pull the power and drive change within the organization.
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 2016 1:34 PM
Nah, yes, but which "public" do we represent? Is it the member of the growth machine business community who calls the mayor? Or the victim's family? Or the people who operate the underground economy? Or is it the rest of us? We're probably something like what Kierkegaard calls the chimney sweeps and chamber maids....not the elite, not the soldiers, but don't we count too? So what processes do we shepherd to ensure that the proper mix of the "public" is being consulted?
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New technology will record interviews at Richmond Police Department - News - Voice News

New technology will record interviews at Richmond Police Department - News - Voice News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Voice is your source for all northern Macomb & St. Clair counties 24-hour breaking news, local news, sports, entertainment and more. View weather updates, watch videos and photos. Keep up with News and local Sports. Find restaurants, entertainment, cars, homes and jobs at Voice News.
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Law Enforcement Staffing in California (PPIC Publication)

Law Enforcement Staffing in California (PPIC Publication) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Research shows that increased police staffing is a cost-effective way to prevent crime.
The most recent credible research finds that an additional police officer reduces crime by 1.3 violent crimes and 4.2 property crimes per year. Other recent evidence estimates that the crime-reducing benefits of hiring an additional police officer exceed $300,000 per year, much more than the annual cost of an additional officer. With California’s incarceration rates declining since the implementation of public safety realignment and Proposition 47, adding law enforcement staff is one cost-effective strategy to look at.
Californians share national concerns about community-police relationships.
Community-police relationships have recently become a focus of national attention, as incidents across the country have brought concerns about the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities by law enforcement to the forefront. According to the January 2016 PPIC Statewide Survey, 61% of Californians think that blacks and other minorities do not receive equal treatment relative to whites in the criminal justice system, up 6 percentage points from the January 2015 survey. This opinion is held by majorities across racial/ethnic groups (Asians, blacks, Latinos, and whites), from 55% of whites to 92% of blacks.
Almost half of California’s law enforcement officers work for municipal police departments.
In 2015 there were more than 118,000 full-time law enforcement employees in California; roughly 77,000 were sworn law enforcement officers (with full arrest powers) and 41,000 were civilian staff. About 48% of sworn officers were municipal police officers, 39% were county sheriff officers, and almost 10% were with the California Highway Patrol (CHP). About 3% were employed by other agencies, such as university, port, and transportation districts and the State Department of Parks and Recreation.
Sworn officers are predominately non-jail employees, and most are male.
In 2014, there were roughly 66,500 non-jail (patrol) and 10,500 sworn jail officers. Of the 77,000 total sworn officers, 67,000 (or 87%) were males. In 2014, there were 29,500 non-jail and 11,500 jail civilian staff. Of the roughly 41,000 civilian staff, only 15,000 (or 37%) were males.
Staffing has not fully rebounded since the Great Recession.
The number of law enforcement staff began to decline in California at the onset of the Great Recession. Between 2008 and 2015, the state lost 4,051 sworn staff and 1,293 civilian staff—5% and 3% of 2008 totals, respectively. The number of sworn officers per 100,000 California residents dropped from 221 in 2008 to 198 in 2015. Looking at the numbers across agency types for 2008 to 2015, we see that police officers are down almost 7%, sheriff’s deputies are down 4%, and other officers are down almost 3%. The number of highway patrol officers was slightly higher in 2015 than it was in 2008, but that is because the CHP did not experience drastic cuts until 2010. Between 2010 and 2015, the CHP lost 6% of officers.
Rob Duke's insight:
Hmmm....more cops reduce crime....interesting and not really surprising....
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Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals?

Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In interviews Wednesday, more than a dozen prominent St. Louis-area activists and organizers recalled Seals as an energetic yet polarizing figure within the protest movement. Not in the business of earning goodwill, Seals was scorned by many prominent activists yet beloved by a cadre of local activists who regarded him as a brave truth-teller. This week he is being mourned by both groups.

“He was a frontline solider, a warrior,” said Anthony Shahid, a longtime St. Louis activist, himself known as a sharp-tongued firebrand, who knew Seals well. “I loved that young brother, and I loved how he fearlessly stood up for our people.”
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Four Oakland PD officers fired in wake of sex scandal

Four Oakland PD officers fired in wake of sex scandal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Four police officers in Oakland, California, have been fired for involvement in a department-wide sex scandal, Mayor Libby Schaaf said in a press conference Wednesday.
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Bethany M's comment, September 12, 2016 7:51 PM
I grew up in Sacramento, California so this is especially shocking to me that this happened so close to my home. It makes you realize that instances like this can happen and DO happen anywhere and everywhere. However, it isn’t surprising to me that instances like this DO happen especially since the average police academy is 18 weeks and 60 credits of college. You need more training to be a teacher than you do to be a police officer in the United States. I’ve always believed that training to become a police officer wasn’t long enough. I think they should at least be required to have bachelor degrees. I know the actions of these few corrupt officers shouldn’t directly reflect every police officer in the United States but I do believe that requiring more training can help weed out corrupt individuals.
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Councilwoman: Most Dangerous With Guns Are Cops

Councilwoman:  Most Dangerous With Guns Are Cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A city councilwoman in North Carolina is walking back an explosive statement she wrote Monday on her personal Facebook page in which he said that the “most dangerous people with guns” aren’t criminals, but police officers and soldiers.
“I am all about keeping guns away from dangerous people, but I feel like more of us should be pointing out that the most dangerous people with guns are cops and soldiers, and that the no-fly list and FBI anti-terror efforts are seriously corrupted by entrapment, racial profiling and Islamophobia,” Durham City Councilwoman Jillian Johnson posted.
The post, which was later deleted, ignited an online firestorm that resulted in Johnson issuing a “clarifying” statement Wednesday:
“I believe that state-sanctioned violence causes more harm, and is therefore more dangerous, than non state-sanctioned violence. I believe this is true both because the approval of those in authority and often the general public gives a veneer of acceptability to actions we would otherwise condemn, but also because states have the capacity to spend huge resources equipping and funding people to use force in defense of their interests.  We should not ignore these facts, or wrongly assume that those who believe that this situation is fundamentally unjust and should not continue are harboring a hatred for police and soldiers,” Johnson continued. “I certainly find a great many of the actions taken by militaries and police forces here in the US and around the world extremely troubling, and I also respect the humanity of those who do not share this disagreement.”
Rob Duke's insight:
A bit dated, but still part of the story going on this summer....
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Thomas Antal's comment, September 8, 2016 2:33 PM
What’s hard to grasp is the fact that the soldiers and police officers are the ones helping ensure chaos and war don’t take place on American Soil. It’s sad how many people don’t fully understand the daily lives of both police and military service members. In profession where these brave men and women put their lives on the line for the people on a daily basis it’s hard to come back and be met with this type of criticism. If only they could do their job for a day maybe they would see more than what’s put on the news or social media.