Police Problems and Policy
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White House 'Does Not at All Regret' Botched Raid to Rescue Luke Somers

White House 'Does Not at All Regret' Botched Raid to Rescue Luke Somers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The mission to rescue U.S. hostage Luke Somers in Yemen ended with his death, but the White House says it should still send a message to militants that the k...
Rob Duke's insight:

I'm not at all throwing stones at the military personnel involved here, but isn't it interesting that the White House has no problem castigating cops with their 20:20 hindsight, but has no regrets about their own unfortunate and largely unforseen unintended consequences....?

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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Corrections Officer Armando Gallegos, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, California

Corrections Officer Armando Gallegos, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, California | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Corrections Officer Armando Gallegos succumbed to injuries sustained at approximately 3:30 pm on April 21st, 2018 when he was attacked by multiple inmates at the Kern Valley State Prison.
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Mental Health Expert to Join Colorado Police Force

Mental Health Expert to Join Colorado Police Force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Amid an increase in mental health, substance abuse, and transient-related calls across many police jurisdictions in Colorado, one agency is hiring a mental health expert who can better assist officers in the field.
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Uninformed Consent

Uninformed Consent | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A common approach is to require firms to give consumers information on the relevant costs and benefits of sharing and to tell them about data breaches. But as I’ve noted, research points to the limits of this approach. It’s unlikely to solve the problem given that users don’t read privacy policies and, despite the media uproar, don’t take much action when they learn of breaches. (Indeed, the majority of Facebook users stayed on the platform after the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke.)

A related approach is to use regulation to directly reduce risks to consumers by, say, placing specific restrictions on what personal data firms can collect and how they can use it, and handing out penalties for noncompliance. In the United States, there is no national law regulating the collection and use of personal data. Some basic ground rules do seem to be in order. In Massachusetts, for example, companies must encrypt personal data that flows over public networks. And California’s groundbreaking new Consumer Privacy Act imposes several rules on firms; for example, businesses that sell consumers’ data must allow users to opt out of such sales without penalty.

But a problem with this approach is that it can lead to the “whack a mole” problem, whereby firms find loopholes to wriggle out of while complying with the letter of the law. For example, California’s new privacy law forbids differential treatment of consumers who exercise their privacy rights — unless it “is reasonably related to the value provided by the consumer’s data” — a possible loophole for firms to exploit. And workarounds may be particularly easy to find in the digital space, where firms are quite nimble; a quick tweak in wording of a privacy policy can have enormous consequences.

So the real promise of government intervention may lie in giving firms an incentive to use consumers’ personal data only in reasonable ways. One way to do that is to adopt a tool used in the product safety regime: strict liability, or making firms responsible for negative consequences arising from their use of consumer data, even in the absence of negligence or ill intent. Relatedly, firms that collect our personal data could be deemed, as legal scholars Jack Balkin and Jonathan Zittrain have argued, “information fiduciaries” — entities that have a legal obligation to behave in a trustworthy manner with our data. Interventions such as these would give firms a sincere interest in responsibly using data and in preempting abuses and failures in the system of data collection and sharing (because otherwise they’d face financial penalties).

To be sure, many difficult questions need to be answered first. For example, how would damages be determined? Although the harm done by disclosure cannot be calculated with precision, it could be estimated. Terry Bollea (also known as “Hulk Hogan”) was awarded $115 million in compensatory damages when Gawker violated his privacy by posting a sex tape of him where millions could see it. (Full disclosure: I worked as a consultant to Bollea’s team on this case.)

The real promise of government intervention may lie in giving firms an incentive to use consumers’ personal data only in reasonable ways. One way to do that is to adopt a tool used in the product safety regime: strict liability.
Another challenge is proving harm; because this is hard to do in the privacy sphere, some have cogently argued, the courts would have to accept the notion of probabilistic damages. Also, what constitutes “reasonable” versus “unreasonable” data use? That’s difficult to articulate, but it’s often the kind of thing you know when you see it. And a key aim of regulation would be to serve as a deterrent and prevent irresponsible use of data in the first place.

A common concern with regulation is that it can reduce competition. The cost of compliance is disproportionately burdensome for small players, so the net effect of regulation can be greater market power for large incumbents. But there is reason to believe that this pitfall would be less likely if firms were given an interest in behaving in a trustworthy manner. First, companies with deep pockets would be disproportionately targeted by those seeking damages. Second, this approach is conceivably less restrictive to new entrants because it need not require the large up-front investment in compliance that direct approaches typically do.

Regulation is not a panacea for the surveillance economy. It will surely introduce some new issues. There’s also more to gaining consumers’ trust than merely following the law. But if we draw on insights from behavioral science and accept that consumers are imperfect decision makers rather than perfectly rational economic actors, we can design better regulation that will help realize the benefits of data collection while mitigating its pitfalls — for both firms and consumers alike.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's not just surveillance by the police and it's not just the power of coercion that should worry us in this electronic age.

Fake news.  Targeted advertising.  Persuasion and Reciprocity are tools that can (and are) abused as much as, if not moreso, than is the power of the sword.

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CA police shooting | One killed, 3 injured Rancho Cordova | The Modesto Bee

Sacramento County Sheriff’s deputy Mark Stasyuk was killed and another deputy was injured during a shooting Monday afternoon in Rancho Cordova, according to the sheriff’s department. Suspect was shot and taken into custody.
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Kansas sheriff's deputy shot, killed in line of duty

Kansas sheriff's deputy shot, killed in line of duty | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A sheriff's deputy in Kansas was shot and killed in the line of duty on Sunday, investigators said.

Sedgwick County Deputy Robert Kunze III, 41, died Sunday after responding to a "suspicious character call," officials said. 

Kunze responded to reports of a black vehicle around 1:18 p.m., Sheriff Jeff Easter said at a news conference. Upon arrival, the suspect's vehicle had its hood open and another vehicle -- belonging to the witnesses who reported the "suspicious character" -- was parked in front of it. 

At 1:48 p.m., Kunze administered his emergency button to alert dispatch that he'd been shot.

When a responding deputy arrived, he saw Kunze laying on his side next to the suspect, who was laying face down on the ground next to a "40 caliber weapon."

"Robert was a great asset to the sheriff's office," Sheriff Jeff Easter said at a news conference. "Robert was an exceptional deputy who was loved by everyone he worked with."
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Red-Light Cameras Increase Accidents

Red-Light Cameras Increase Accidents | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A collection of media coverage reporting on the increase in accidents at red light ticket camera intersections.
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But not everyone agrees that red light cameras improve safety.

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Red light cameras can catch you speeding in Beaverton | kgw.com

Red light cameras can catch you speeding in Beaverton | kgw.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
According to state law, drivers can be ticketed if caught traveling 11 miles per hour or more over the speed limit during green or yellow light phases, or 21 mph over the speed limit during red light phases.
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Berkeley police posted activists' mugshots on Twitter and celebrated retweets, emails reveal

Berkeley police posted activists' mugshots on Twitter and celebrated retweets, emails reveal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A California police agency that published the names and photos of anti-fascist protesters on Twitter said it was creating a “counter-narrative” on social media and celebrated its high rate of retweets and “engagement”, internal records reveal.

The Berkeley police department (BPD) faced widespread backlash last month after posting the personal information of arrested activists online, leading to Fox News coverage and harassment and abuse against the leftwing demonstrators at a far-right rally. New emails have shown that the city has an explicit policy of targeting protesters with mugshot tweets, with the goal of using “social media to help create a counter-narrative”.

Officials have further praised the “unusually deep and broad publication and attention” to activists’ mugshots, saying it helped create a “narrative about the City’s ability to enforce the rule of law”.

The records have sparked fresh scrutiny of the northern California police department, with critics accusing law enforcement of aiding the “alt-right” by shaming anti-fascists online after making questionable arrests. City lawmakers, citing the Guardian’s reporting, have now proposed an ordinance that would ban police from posting mugshots on social media unless the arrested individuals posed an immediate public safety threat.
Rob Duke's insight:

Geez!  The counter-narrative with BPD is not that "right wing good: left wing bad", the counter-narrative that they're trying to influence is: "police ineffective--Berkeley is fair game if you want to be disruptive".

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Anthony Jaster's comment, September 15, 7:10 PM
I understand of wanting to show that your department is doing something in response to disruptive protestors by posting photos. This is only a little bit different than putting it in the paper.
Sierra Grimes's comment, September 17, 1:08 AM
Found it really interesting that neither this article or others it referenced mentioned weapons other than "poles for signs" causing arrests, but when I looked on the Berkeley PD Twitter, found that they posted photos of what was being confiscated. There were knives, pepper spray, rocks, and even a hammer besides the aforementioned poles (which the city had actually made a statement specifically banning use of at this protest). Also tried finding out how the group holding the original protest acted to see if the arrests/social media posts were truly one-sided, but couldn't find much. As useful as social media can be in terms of alerting the public of those who could be considered dangerous, there can also be a lot of negative repercussions, especially when it comes to alt-right and antifa groups clashing. With them, the internet and "doxxing" is heavily utilized, so posting personal info results in risks of threats to life and limb, actual harm, or things like "SWATing". I think that generally there needs to be more training for police when it comes to the use of social media in situations involving protests and arrests of those involved, as inevitably posting on social media will likely create some form of a narrative.
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Activism Chicago Style

Activism Chicago Style | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Activism Chicago Style ... Recently, we have had three major instances of activism; the shutdown of the Dan Ryan Expressway
Rob Duke's insight:

Thoughts?

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Fatal shooting: Could police have done more to defuse confrontation?

Fatal shooting: Could police have done more to defuse confrontation? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

The police officer who fatally shot a man armed with a knife on the Fox Cities Trestle Trail bridge on May 23 did little to de-escalate the situation before opening fire, a civil rights attorney said after reviewing videos of the shooting.

Attorney Jon Safran of Milwaukee said police departments historically haven't done enough to train officers how to use de-escalation techniques, such as giving troubled suspects some space, informing them police don't want to hurt them or asking them to talk through their problems.

"This cop doesn't do anything in attempt to do that," Safran told USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin.

Fox Crossing police officer Seely Moe responded to Fritse Park for reports of a man acting erratically and threatening people with a knife. Moe grabbed his AR-15 rifle, ordered bystanders to get away and confronted 25-year-old Joshua M. Gomoll on the bridge. Moe aimed his rifle at Gomoll and repeatedly ordered him to get down on the ground or he would shoot. Gomoll didn't comply and walked toward Moe with a knife, resulting in Moe shooting him three times.

Moe shot Gomoll a fourth time as he tried to get up. Other officers later used a Taser on Gomoll before sliding away the knife, handcuffing him and giving aid.

Gomoll died on the bridge from gunshots to his chest and abdomen, according to an autopsy report.

The Wisconsin Department of Justice investigated Gomoll's death, and the Winnebago County District Attorney's Office decided the shooting was justified.

Rob Duke's insight:

The shooting looks good to me.  He's chasing people on the bridge and then turns coming towards the officer refusing to obey orders.

These knife situations can go bad too quickly, see this video for a graphic illustration.  In seconds a man with a knife kills several officers--warning it's not pretty, so don't watch if you have a weak stomach:

https://www.full30.com/video/9030f86490b70a13d01f3244842a91c2

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Christa Lynch's comment, September 9, 9:22 PM
Sometimes I wonder if there is more that could be done. I am not an officer in that situation, but I do question if deadly force is always necessary. To have this kind of power is a great responsibility. It is unfortunate that it has been abused and as a result every shooting is put on display in the media
Ashley von Borstel's comment, September 11, 6:25 PM
I just watched the video you shared with us and it allowed me to understand further why I think the shooting was appropriate. In just one opening, the man could have hurt someone or the officer, just like in the video. Sometimes situations cannot be defused. Shooting the suspect sometimes happens and, in this article, he warned the individual to get on the ground or he'd shoot. I find it understandable for the officer to shoot because the man started to approach him and was a threat to the bystanders.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 8:31 PM
You don't always shoot the person with a knife, but it is often justified. In one case my partner and I had a d.v. with one party in the kitchen and still operating at "defcon 1" and ready to go nuclear. We call her out and she emerges from this kitchen on a "shotgun" house (situated so one hallway goes down the middle of the house--I guess that's why it's called a shotgun house--compact, but the hall dumps out in the dining living area and it can be difficult to decorate and create "feng shui". In this house, they had the table partially blocking the kitchen door, then you had to further navigate all the way to the other side of the room to get around the couch, then dodge a chair, then shimmy sideways past the coffee table for the length of the couch, then stumble over the dog, etc...you get the idea. By the time she gets to us with butcher knife in hand, she's exhausted and we're kind of giggling. This was before tasers, so it was PR-24 baton to the wrist and the fight was over. But you don't get that lucky most of the time.
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Cincinnati police release video showing officers engaging gunman who killed 3 at downtown bank

Omar Perez, 29, was killed after four Cincinnati police officers fired 11 rounds at him.
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Nikki's comment, September 19, 11:47 PM
These types of incidents are becoming all too common. I hate to admit it, but when I was living abroad I barely batted an eye at the stories of gunmen attacking defenseless people. I hate to think that I have become desensitized to this type of violence, but its seems as though every tragedy these days follows the same pattern (e.g. we mourn, we blame, and we forget until the next incident). Its crazy to think that you have to look over your shoulder 24/7, but that is the world we are living in. You can be attacked at a movie theater, a church, a bank, within your own home, etc., so there is no real safe space. The officers in this situation acted swiftly and did a wonderful job subduing the gunman. The reference to the gunman's lawsuits and paranoia about being surveilled is something we see more often these days. Mental health is a serious issue in this country, but I only really see it discussed in relation to mass shootings.
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Why a black police group issued a stirring defense of Colin Kaepernick

Why a black police group issued a stirring defense of Colin Kaepernick | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sonia Y.W. Pruitt, the national chairperson of the National Black Police Association and a police lieutenant in Maryland, was watching the drama unfold this week and said she was upset by the reactions of the other police organizations. She disagreed with their messages and thought that they didn’t fully reflect the full breadth of political views held by police officers around the country.

So on Wednesday she wrote a letter on behalf of her organization that served as a stirring defense of Kaepernick and sharp rebuke to the harsh words issued by the other police organizations.

“On the contrary,” Pruitt wrote, “NBPA believes that Mr. Kaepernick’s stance is in direct alignment with what law enforcement stands for — the protection of a people, their human rights, their dignity, their safety and their rights as American citizens.”

“That NAPO has chosen this matter to take a stance, only perpetuates the narrative that police are racist, with no regard, acknowledgment, respect, or understanding of the issues and concerns of the African American community,” she wrote.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Pruitt said her organization was motivated to respond to add an alternative police perspective into the debate.

“As black officers, we often find ourselves riding the wave with other officers, but no one has asked us what our opinion is,” Pruitt said. “On many of these social issues we disagree, but nobody knows that, because the assumption is that if you’re a police officer that you all think the same way.”
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Julia Fisher-Salmon's comment, September 11, 3:05 AM
I fully agree with Sonia Pruitt. There needs to be a change in how police treat people of color. I understand that socioeconomic conditions and the lack of opportunities that are present in primarily black and Hispanic communities increase the odds of criminality. I understand that there are dangerous communities ridden with gangs, drug cartels, and dangerous people. However, that does not give police the right to put that suspicion on every person of color. Young black men should not be targeted for what they’re wearing, point blank period. Police are trained to deal with dangerous people, it is there job and I understand that everyone has their own biases and reflexes to dangerous situations. Police officers should not be intimidated by the mere presence of black men. Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem for all of the lives lost at the hands of those who protect and serve. For every case of a black person losing their life and the officer gets paid leave as punishment. Kaepernick’s intention was not to disrespect the military or the American flag, which is obvious. Why would he protest a flag? He’s protesting the injustices that has been brought to surface recently, and ALL of those before the Black Lives Matter movement.
Madi Janes's curator insight, September 17, 2:16 AM
I think the most interesting part of the scandal/debate around Kaepernick civil rights fight is not how divided people are but how so many try to speak generally for a population that can not be generalized. I have seen many who have serve say its a disgrace to kneel while others say they find kneeling respectful way to protest. 
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Nike shares dip as Kaepernick ad spurs boycott

Nike shares dip as Kaepernick ad spurs boycott | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Shares of Nike Inc fell 3 percent on Tuesday as calls for a boycott of the sportswear giant gained traction on social media following its choice of Colin Kaepernick as a face for the 30th anniversary of its "Just Do It" slogan.

Rob Duke's insight:

This one might be too hot to handle....

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Christa Lynch's comment, September 9, 9:50 PM
This is all anyone has talked about all week. What did Nike expect? I feel that to support one protest and not the other is hypocritical. I believe in the right to protest peacefully. If you use your status and power to bring awareness to an issue, good for you. If you want to burn perfectly good items (I wish they would be donated to a shelter) that’s your right. I just can’t believe Nike could be so clueless to what kind of backlash they might receive.
Ashley von Borstel's comment, September 11, 6:43 PM
Of course they knew there would be a backlash. How could they not? Sometimes when change needs to happen, it's brave people like Kaepernick and the Nike company that have to shake things up. If idiots want to burn their clothes, that's their problem. They spent their own money on the clothes, so it's really the person who is burning the clothes that is losing. I just can't believe how long this "issue" about kneeling in front of the flag has gone on. When I was in high school, we were supposed to stand in first period to the pledge, but to be honest, we were too tired and just sat there listening to the intercom. Teachers didn't even care to make us or even do it themselves. Everyone has different opinions and that is expected.
Matt Mertes's comment, September 15, 9:41 PM
If I were Nike I would probably do the same thing, yeah their shares for right now have gone down, but like you said it's all anyone is, or wants, to talk about right now and brand recognition is what they want and they are certainly getting that. I wouldn't be surprised if they are planning a line launch soon. Everything is planned at that high up. You don't "accidentally" choose one of the most controversial public sports figures right now to be the face of a new ad campaign, and a doubt Nike executives are surprised at the consequences.
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2 Deputies Wounded, Suspect Killed in Shootout at East L.A. Park: Sheriff’s Officials

2 Deputies Wounded, Suspect Killed in Shootout at East L.A. Park: Sheriff’s Officials | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies were struck by gunfire and a suspect was dead following a shooting incident in an East L.A. park Wednesday evening, officials said.

Both deputies were in serious but stable condition at the hospital following a shootout involving at least three suspects at Ruben F. Salazar Park, on the 3800 block of Whittier Boulevard, according to Sheriff Jim McDonnell.
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UC-Berkeley Banned Cops From Using Public Restrooms To Protect Student Feelings

UC-Berkeley Banned Cops From Using Public Restrooms To Protect Student Feelings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Berkeley, CA – Police officers who worked the protests against conservative speakers at University of California – Berkeley in 2017 were asked not to use the public restrooms on campus.

Young America’s Foundation (YAF) obtained a copy of a letter via a public information request that revealed University of California Police Department (UCPD) officers were told they couldn’t use the restroom nearest to where they were staging because “it was upsetting some students.”

The letter was written to the university’s chancellor, Carol Christ, by an unnamed UCPD security patrol officer.
Rob Duke's insight:

Last week the Berkeley cops were somehow in league with the conservative protesters, but this week we see what kind of politically correct hell they really live in.....

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Nathan L Smoot's comment, September 19, 8:57 PM
It is so sad to see how these police are being treated by those that the are there to serve! Not able to use a public bathroom because it was “upsetting students”? How did it get to the point were a public servant can’t use a public restroom. I guess I’m just shocked and baffled.
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Starved for recruits, Alaska police pin blame on retirement system

Starved for recruits, Alaska police pin blame on retirement system | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
They’re battling an opioid epidemic, rising crime, slashed budgets and thinned ranks.
Rob Duke's insight:

Low unemployment; low public opinion of officers (at the moment); salaries that haven't kept pace as the rest of the economy rebounds....just a few more reasons why....

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Nikki's comment, Today, 12:07 AM
The Army just implemented a new blended retirement system in January 2018, so I am interested to see how this will affect our ranks. It is estimated that 80%+ of soldiers exit the service without receiving any retirement benefits, and that was due to the strict 20-year minimum that was imposed prior to this new system. I think the retirement system for Alaskan police officers may play a role in the thinning of their ranks, but it may not be as significant as the police chief in the article was saying. Many of the reasons that were listed in the insight section can contribute to the lack of recruits and retention. There are numerous factors that can be attributed to job satisfaction, and the 401k style retirement plan is just one of them.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 12:17 AM
Nikki: that's a great point. L.E. tends to think of themselves as a full career, but I've known about 30-40% who never work even close to the 20-30 years. For them, that old system doesn't provide much benefit. Even those who stay for 20 plus may be better served to have something more portable. Instead of staying past the point healthy for oneself and family, maybe more would go back to school or shift over to a different career. What we see as a "bad" thing might actually be a good thing.
Nikki's comment, Today, 2:09 AM
Thank you for the response Professor Duke. I didn't even take into consideration the career shifts and opportunities for progression that are available to LEOs, so thank you for providing that example. Some of the leaders who may be concerned about the thinning ranks may not be taking into account the fact that a good portion of officers don't want to be on patrol for the majority of their careers. Everyone has to work their way up in the organization, so it should be expected that some will stick around just long enough to gain experience before moving on to higher paying positions in different organizations, transferring within the agency, and/or requesting specialty assignments. My friend's mother was recently promoted to Lieutenant in the LAPD and she has worked for the organization for more than 27 years (with 18 years as a sergeant). During her career, the newly minted Lieutenant has worked as an agency funeral coordinator, probationary sergeant, probationary detective, supervisor in the Emergency Operations Division, and she has taken part in numerous task forces and special assignment as well. When I first heard about her professional experiences I was surprised that there were so many different avenues available to police officers, because I always thought of the career field in terms of beat cops and homicide detectives (as seen on TV). I now know that I had an extremely limited view of what professional opportunities are available to law enforcement officers. In the Army we have the ability to change career fields as well, but we are limited by our time in service (TIS), rank, special considerations relevant to the job (physical ability, age, test scores), and most importantly the needs of the Army.
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Ninth Circuit Reinstates Action by Man Taken From House, Handcuffed, Forced to Ground

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed a summary judgment in favor of four Fresno sheriff’s deputies who, responding to a woman’s claim to a dispatcher that her husband was drunk and breaking things, made a warrantlless entry into the couple’s house when the man would not come outside, brought him out, handcuffed him, forced him to the ground, and later arrested him.

 Reversal of the judgment by Magistrate Judge Sheila K. Oberto of the Eastern District of California came in a memorandum opinion filed Thursday.

The plaintiff, Dennis Maric, sued Fresno County sheriff’s deputies Jon Alvarado, Todd Burk, John Robinson, and Fernando Maldonado. After Oberto granted summary judgment to the defendants on most of Maric’s claims, the plaintiff’s excessive force and assault and battery claims went to jury trial, which Maric lost.

He appealed the summary judgment as to unlawful entry unlawful arrest, in violation of the Fourth Amendment, as well as unlawful entry and false imprisonment, under California law.
Rob Duke's insight:

This will test the validity of Ramey v. California (1976).  In Ramey, the court defined exigent circumstances in which officers could enter a home to make an arrest without a warrant:

1. Hot pursuit

2. imminent threat to a life or physical danger;

3. destruction of evidence;

4. significant destruction of property (someone threatening to burn down the building); or

5. of course, consent.

https://law.justia.com/cases/california/supreme-court/3d/16/263.html

http://le.alcoda.org/publications/point_of_view/files/RAMEY.pdf

 

It seems in this case that the deputies had:

#5 and also maybe #4, so it will be interesting to see what the court rules.

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Demonstrators demand white police officer be 'locked up' for killing Botham Jean

Demonstrators demand white police officer be 'locked up' for killing Botham Jean | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Demonstrators on Friday night demanded that a white police officer, Amber Guyger, who shot and killed a 26-year-old St Lucian national in his apartment last week, be “locked up” and fired from the Dallas Police Department.
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Boan White's comment, September 19, 2:19 AM
Ok I'm confused if officer Amber Guyger is already being charged with manslaughter why are there the protestors marched through downtown Dallas chanting “lock her up,”. Should protests not be saved for if officer Amber Guyger might not be sent to prison.
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Is Red-Light Camera Decline Causing More Driving Deaths? Yes and No | News

Is Red-Light Camera Decline Causing More Driving Deaths? Yes and No | News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
July 25, 2018 - While other factors are at play, as more cities have shuttered their red-light
camera programs, red-light-running crash deaths have been on the rise.
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Sierra Grimes's comment, September 17, 12:04 AM
I wasn't aware that there was actually a decrease in red-light cameras, if anything, I figured they'd be increasing considering the current digital climate. I can see how utilizing these devices does have the potential to have more negative effects in certain situations, like drivers trying not to run the light when they are driving at a speed where it would actually likely be safer for them to proceed through the intersection to avoid a ticket. I like how this article highlighted the necessity of finding a good balance in using these cameras, as they do have a certain effect on how drivers behave wherever they are placed. Instances of running through red lights is also heavily dependent on environment and conditions, like when the roads get slick in Fairbanks and oftentimes people can't quite make the full stop on a red light, so that's a major consideration for camera placement and enforcement.
Boan White's comment, September 19, 2:39 AM
The fact that people are doing such things is not only stupid can considered by some to willfully committing a crime. Afterall a decline in Red-Light Camera would Causing More Driving Deaths. Part of this is because people have a tendency to do things if think they can get away with it.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 12:21 AM
I think much of the increase in injuries comes from that situation where you decide to "go for it", but the guy ahead of you "chickens out". This has increased the rear-enders and, in some cases where that lead car is then pushed out into cross traffic.
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Police: Capital murder charges likely in Texas cop's death

HOUSTON — Two men arrested in the fatal shooting of a North Texas undercover police officer during a bar robbery are expected to face capital murder charges, police said Saturday.

Samuel Mayfield and Timothy Huff remained jailed Saturday on bonds totaling $850,000 for each individual. Each suspect has been charged with 10 counts of aggravated robbery and two counts of criminal attempted capital murder.

Police said that Mayfield and Huff, both 33, and another suspect, Dacion Steptoe, 23, were confronted by Officer Garrett Hull and a team of undercover and uniformed officers after the trio robbed a Fort Worth Bar early Friday morning.


The 40-year-old officer was shot by Steptoe during a foot chase. Hull was taken to a hospital where he died late Friday night. Steptoe was killed at the scene by another officer who returned fire.
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Madi Janes's curator insight, September 17, 2:07 AM
I wish I could stay unbiased in these situations but coming from a blue family its always hard to not see things in a personal light. I still find the death penalty in need of a update not only on procedure but on what is deserving of it. In this case I can't argue against it and I give my thoughts to the officers family. The family thanks you and your service will not be forgotten. 
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Officer fired due to social media posts related to Sterling Brown arrest

Officer fired due to social media posts related to Sterling Brown arrest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
One of the police officers involved in the January arrest of Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown has been fired as a result of Facebook posts he made concerning the incident. The officer was identified as Erik Andrade by Milwaukee police chief Alfonso Morales during a speech at Marquette University on Thursday, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Ashley Luthern and Mary Spicuzza. Morales revealed Andrade was terminated fo
Rob Duke's insight:

There must be more to it....I don't see how making posts in poor taste make the officer useless to testify.  If he lied about the posts, then that's another story, but I don't see that here....

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Tatum Upchurch's comment, September 16, 10:39 PM
I can understand this actually. For instance on my volleyball team if a teammate poste something that is out of line or raunchy she is just not representing herself but she is representing our team and school. when this officer posted things that brought controversy and negativity he is not just representing his name but the whole police department and if it wasn't benefiting them they have the ability to take action.
Sierra Grimes's comment, September 17, 1:27 AM
I completely understand the actions of firing the officer as he violated a social media policy and generally showed distasteful public action, but I'm also confused as to why he is now considered useless for testimony. Unless they believe that because of his comments he can no longer be held as credible, maybe that's why.
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Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
KTLA.com reports:  Videos showing the moment a man begins firing at two Los Angeles Police Department officers in North Hills — before he’s shot multiple times by one of them — were released by LAPD on Monday after the shooting left him dead and another officer injured. The man seen shooting at officers, 32-year-old Richard Mendoza, …
Rob Duke's insight:

Even when they appear to be cooperating, they may not be...this looks like a textbook stop right up until the split second when the guy decides to attack.

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Morgan Erickson's comment, September 12, 2:07 PM
Honestly I did not see that coming, he was so quick pulling out that pistol...it is a good thing she had a partner or this could have turned out a lot worse. Props to the male officer for thinking so quickly and shooting directly through the car!
Matt Mertes's comment, September 15, 9:25 PM
I feel this is one of the biggest reasons that we see younger officers being nervous. When you're out there anything could happen. That thought could be making them jittery and sometimes react poorly. I think the two officers here responded to this threat reasonably, but these instances prove the dangers faced by police are very real.
Madi Janes's curator insight, September 17, 2:12 AM
I think this is one of those moments that people say you will never understand or truly know how you would react until it happens. Crazy how in that quick second he went from being cooperative to firing his gun. This is what they mean when they say you don't have time to second guess. 
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Trial date set in killing of Fairbanks police sergeant | Local News | newsminer.com

Trial date set in killing of Fairbanks police sergeant | Local News | newsminer.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Fairbanks man accused of gunning down a Fairbanks police sergeant on a downtown street in 2016 will go to trial March 18.

Sgt. Allen Brandt was shot four times in his legs and hip and once in the chest while responding to a report of shots fired on Oct. 16, 2016. Brandt initially survived the shooting but died several days later from complications of surgery to remove shrapnel that had lodged in his left eye. 

Brandt’s dashcam captured footage of Anthony Jenkins-Alexie, 30, as he approached Brandt’s patrol vehicle and started firing a pistol at him. 

Anthony Jenkins-Alexie, 30, is charged with two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of second-degree murder, first-degree assault, first-degree vehicle theft, second-degree theft of a firearm, second- and third-degree weapons misconduct and two counts of tampering with physical evidence.
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Julia Fisher-Salmon's comment, September 11, 2:51 AM
The killing of this police officer is horrible. I can’t imagine working a job to serve and protect just to be murdered, I pray his family is okay and that this trial will rule in favor of Sgt. Allen Brandt.
Catherine Sample's comment, September 16, 4:18 PM
While it is encouraging to see that Brandt's family is closer to seeing justice, it must be extremely hard for them to have waited so long for it. I understand that there is Due Process and many contributing factors, it should not take two and a half years for the family and community to see justice for a life that was taken from them. Tragedies such as this are a reminder to us that police problems are not just something that happen in large cities with high crime rates, they happen here at home too.
Tatum Upchurch's comment, September 16, 10:33 PM
I have heard a lot of good things by family and friends of this officer and I am happy to see that the guy who did this is finally going to trial and getting the punishment he deserves and hopefully this family will have a little bit of closure.
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Cop mistakes apartment for her own, kills her neighbor –

Cop mistakes apartment for her own, kills her neighbor – | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police issued a news release Friday saying the shooting happened around 10 p.m. Thursday. The officer, who has not been identified, had arrived at her apartment complex in uniform after working a shift.

Authorities say the officer called dispatch to report the shooting. She told responding officers that she believed the victim’s apartment was her own when she entered it.
Rob Duke's insight:

How does this happen?

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Tatum Upchurch's comment, September 16, 10:27 PM
I think that this was very wrong of the officer, yes she thought that it was her apartment but people just dont go guns blazing when the hear an intruder, they usually call the cops while it is happening. being a police officer they have been in a lot of situations and I think yes its human nature to pull out a gun for protection but not shoot blindly at somone. I do think that she should be charged for this.
Anna Givens's comment, September 18, 1:48 PM
I am not sure we can come to this officers defense. Was she tired after her shift? Possibly. I also can understand being on the wrong floor, especially because I have read reports that she is a newer tenant there. But, I have seen individuals posting on social media who live in those apartments and showed on video that those doors don't stay ajar like the officer previously stated. They are heavy doors that slam shut on their own and don't just stay open. Witnesses say they heard a lot of police talk such as 'Open up, Open up' which leads me to believe the door was in fact locked and she was forcing her way into his home. I wonder if she was given a sobriety test following the incident. If the door was locked and your keypad code wasn't working I think most individuals would look at which door they are trying to get into while dealing with being locked out--also, while screaming open up, open up--again, look at the door--it must of had a number on it to indicate the apartment number. Doesn't sound very police officer to me, to lack this much common sense. While I would hope a police officer wouldn't intentionally cause harm on someone, this story sounds very conspicuous. I also wonder did they ever have run ins prior to this? Why didn't she administer first aid after shooting him? I am also upset that the media is trying to smear him as a druggie because he had marijuana. He is the victim here, she isn't.
Rob Duke's comment, September 18, 2:53 PM
There are certainly a lot of questions. I remember an attorney telling us during a liability training to not stop saying "stop resisting", even after you'd already had to use force. His reasoning was because witnesses memories were so blurred that you had to keep saying "stop resisting" so that someone would remember. Our comment was "won't they remember that we were saying it afterwards" and he replied "nope, during these incidents memories get jumbled, so we just need someone to remember that you were telling the person to comply; and we need you to remember how important it is to a jury, so you just keep saying it over and over." Having been in a few "life or deaths", I can attest to the fact that memories are jumbled, so I'm not yet willing to say she lied when she might have been trying to get help after the shooting, then it'd be reasonable to demand "open up, open up". I'm not saying that's what happened, but the complete investigation will hopefully clear up these questions when it is finally released.
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A Modoc County deputy slain alone shows problem of policing rural California | The Sacramento Bee

A Modoc County deputy slain alone shows problem of policing rural California | The Sacramento Bee | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Modoc County in Northern California lost its first deputy in the line of duty in 2016, highlighting the scarcity of law enforcement in rural counties, where answering calls alone is common.
Rob Duke's insight:

My first chief job straddled the Modoc and Siskiyou County lines.  I didn't know the Deputy, but can attest to the "tombstone" courage aspect of policing where your backup was often more than an hour or two away.

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Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 8:22 PM
We had a saying in rural California: "one ranger: one riot"...more often than not--there's no choice but to handle "it" alone. In some ways it's a proverb that is told and a mantra that is repeated to remind you that you can never depend on the radio to save you--even when backup is minutes away--first you must use good tactics and react--then call it in...or in this case...wait to meet your backup with the suspect in custody....
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 8:24 PM
Note: I'm not saying in any way that this deputy could have done something differently...sometimes the odds are just stacked against you. From what I heard from reports in the area, that was the case here....
Anna Givens's comment, September 18, 2:03 PM
So many problems within this story. First of all, Breiner had such a long history of trouble that they dealt with him frequently. Why hasn't he been put away by now? Surely he was a felon and shouldn't of even had guns let alone an illegal weapon in the state of CA. It is frustrating that police have to waste their time constantly dealing with the same trouble makers causing mayhem. Second, $13 an hour? McDonalds employees in some states are making that much or more. And in California?! While patrolling state+federal lands? Also, this cop should of waited for experienced backup prior to entering or going near their ranch. What happened after he was shot and killed, shows that the experienced cop could of drastically changed the outcome of that situation.