Police Problems and Policy
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5% Of NYPD Cops Responsible For 40% of ‘Resisting Arrest’ Charges (AUDIO)

5% Of NYPD Cops Responsible For 40% of ‘Resisting Arrest’ Charges (AUDIO) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Fire 5% of the NYPD, and cases of 'resisting arrest' will drop by 40%!
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Rob Duke's comment, December 8, 2014 6:19 PM
We once felt like we needed to chase everyone who fled, but we now recognize that some people are better caught later. Is there any wisdom in long-filing the guy who just won't go along with the program? Why fight when later the guy will probably realize that the warrant will still be there (suspending his license and causing other irritating effects).
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Man dead after officer-involved shooting in Wasilla | Breaking News | frontiersman.com

Man dead after officer-involved shooting in Wasilla | Breaking News | frontiersman.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
WASILLA — A man is dead following an officer-involved shooting in Wasilla Thursday morning.
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The shortcomings of India’s police are not entirely their fault - Politicians’ pets

The shortcomings of India’s police are not entirely their fault - Politicians’ pets | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
India’s 1.9m policemen do not, by and large, enjoy a good reputation. It is easy to understand why. A simple glance at recent news clips substantiates a range of complaints. Are police corrupt? Consider that public rage over extortion by traffic police has prompted the state of Uttarakhand to forbid its finest to carry more than 200 rupees ($2.85) in cash. Brutal? A high court has just ordered an independent investigation into the killing by police gunfire, including from sniper rifles, of 13 people at a peaceful protest against the pollution caused by a copper smelter.

 

Ineffective? In recent incidents of mob lynching that have shocked India, perpetrators have repeatedly explained that they had to take the law into their own murderous hands because the police were absent or unreliable. Callous and incompetent? When a seven-year-old boy was murdered in the bathroom of a private school last year, police in a Delhi suburb forced the lower-caste conductor of a school bus to confess and closed the case. Weeks later a court-ordered reinvestigation used previously ignored CCTV footage to reveal that the killer had been an older student.

Are police in the pockets of powerful politicians? Consider that Delhi police answer not to the city government but to the home ministry, run by the rival Bharatiya Janata Party of the prime minister, Narendra Modi. The city’s ruling party is Aam Aadmi. Since winning Delhi’s election in 2015 it has complained of continuous petty harassment. Among other things, police raided one official’s home and then charged him for possessing a bit more alcohol than is permitted by the arcane Delhi Excise Act. Courts have thrown out 19 out of 22 cases filed by Delhi police against Aam Aadmi’s senior members.

But while lurid press coverage makes it easy to spot police shortcomings, it does less to explain them. Talk to policemen themselves and the reasons for poor performance become clear. There are, to start with, too few of them. Excluding paramilitary forces and riot squads—and including only those in active service rather than the number that governments, for budget purposes, claim are working—India’s ratio of ordinary policemen per 1,000 people is just 1.2, about half the level recommended by the UN. By the government’s own reckoning, the country has 600,000 too few of them. Contrary to impressions of laziness, Indian police tend to be overworked. A national survey in 2014 found that 90% of officers worked longer than eight hours a day, and 73% got no more than one day off per week. Researchers say the recent introduction of eight-hour shifts in the state of Kerala and for city police in Mumbai has radically improved morale.

Police also spend much energy doing things other than fighting crime. Akshay Mangla of Oxford University reckons that in the state of Madhya Pradesh, election duties alone take up between a sixth and an eighth of all police time. This does not just mean providing security to campaign rallies, or protecting ballot boxes in endless rounds of polls. Rules intended to prevent corruption or political bias require that as many as half the higher-ranking officers in the state must be transferred to a new district before every major election.

The administrative structure of the force has changed little since the British Raj. Some two-thirds of police are lowly constables, typically with little training, limited equipment and no powers to arrest or investigate. At the pinnacle stand the 5,000 members of the Indian Police Service, a national corps that before 1920 was staffed only by British officers. Selected via competitive exams, these elite officers rarely stay in a post more than two years, but enjoy housing, transport and other perks. Between them and the lowest-ranking policemen are officers in various state police forces who hold full responsibility for everyone junior but enjoy no influence over their pampered superiors. “Basically they have not invested in middle management,” says Mr Mangla.

One frustrating result is that police stations are often reluctant to issue First Information Reports (FIRs), the necessary beginning to most legal action in India. Mr Mangla explains that since the performance metric that gets reported upwards is the proportion of FIRs that a station investigates and closes, “there is every incentive to keep this denominator low.”

Complaints about India’s police are nothing new. Successive national commissions since the 1970s have urged a range of reforms, which have largely been ignored. A report in 2018 by the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative, an NGO, measured compliance by Indian states with six separate directives on police reform issued by India’s Supreme Court in 2006. Not a single state had fully complied. Small wonder many Indians have concluded that politicians are unwilling to reform the police, because the force serves the interests of politicians perfectly well. The police agree. One state’s police chief recently asked officers to rank their top three problems. In ascending order, they were poor communications inside the force, lack of manpower or resources—and meddling politicians.

Rob Duke's insight:

The same problems crop up over and over again around the world.  It's a matter of scale, but the animal shares the same DNA.

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Stephon Clark shooting | Sacramento police have new policy on foot chases | The Sacramento Bee

Foot pursuits in risky circumstances like the one that ended Stephon Clark’s life in Sacramento may be discouraged. Instead, police officers will be asked to weigh different safety factors when deciding to pursue suspects on foot.
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm....I don't know what I think yet about this.

 

My guess is that this isn't a big deal, but it's political theater to seem to be doing something....

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LAPD Union: 'The ACLU Wants Cops Prosecuted And Jailed'

LAPD Union: 'The ACLU Wants Cops Prosecuted And Jailed' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“Reasonable will now be insufficient,” explains Robert Parry, a Southern California-based consultant to law enforcement officers. “Actions that would now be deemed legal because they are reasonable may soon result in jailing cops because they were not ‘necessary.’”

The bill would allow prosecutors and courts to scrutinize police officers’ split-second decisions, examining whether they might have had other options to address a perceived threat that did not require lethal force. A more restrictive use-of-force policy would entail reviewing the “totality of the circumstances” after the fact. If the measure is passed, police departments can discipline or fire a cop who uses deadly force that is later determined to have been unnecessary, and in some cases, the local District Attorney could file criminal charges against law enforcement officers.
Rob Duke's insight:

States can have more restrictive standards than the Federal Government, but this is probably unworkable creating uncertainty where we need more certainty.

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Terminal Kids Tell Doctor What Gave Their Lives Meaning —

Terminal Kids Tell Doctor What Gave Their Lives Meaning — | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Dr. Alastair McAlpine saw negativity in the world wherever he turned, so he decided to tweet some of the wisdom he'd learned from his terminally ill patients. These kids were all between the ages of four and nine years old, but they still managed to pinpoint exactly what it is that made life worth living for them -- and their answers might surprise you.
Rob Duke's insight:

Just because....

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‘Use of force’ simulator sparks conversations between law enforcement and Richmond residents

‘Use of force’ simulator sparks conversations between law enforcement and Richmond residents | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The question of when it is okay for police officers to fire their weapons has intensified over recent years, both in Richmond and around the country.
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Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In his July 31 column, “Study: ‘Cooling-off periods’ don’t help cops remember officer-involved shootings,” he writes about the practice by some agencies of letting officers calm themselves, sometimes for days, before giving a formal statement. To Balko, this is an outrageous abuse of power.

He cites some research that involved police officers who were put through deadly force “simulation” scenarios. The study concluded that, after these roleplaying (not at all deadly) experiences, the participant’s memories were basically best—or no better—immediately after the incident rather than after a few day’s rest.

He goes on to document other opinions and studies that, he contends, further support the theory that officers should not get rest after being involved in deadly force events. He believes officers should be forced to give a statement immediately, just as, he maintains, citizens must.
Rob Duke's insight:

The other side of the "cooling-off" period debate.

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Video: Louisiana man dies after officers put him in choke hold; experts disagree on excessive force or not | Crime/Police | theadvocate.com

Video: Louisiana man dies after officers put him in choke hold; experts disagree on excessive force or not | Crime/Police | theadvocate.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A criminal justice expert says Avoyelles Parish law officers who wrestled a Marksville man off a tractor while serving an arrest warrant last year used too much force, needlessly escalating
Rob Duke's insight:

A LVNR (Lateral Vascular Neck Restraint) is useful tool, but it's not foolproof and can be applied incorrectly:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLGZFuGYlqE

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El Cajon Officer Attacked With Hammer, Suspect Arrested

El Cajon Officer Attacked With Hammer, Suspect Arrested | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An El Cajon police officer was beaten with a hammer multiple times and rushed to the hospital, officials told Telemundo 20. 

The attack happened at approximately 11:20 a.m. at Van Houten Avenue and West Main Street.  

Officers were called to a fast food restaurant for a man acting irrationally. The suspect was armed with a hammer, police were told, and the man was bashing out windows and threatening people. 

The man, identified by police as Robert Dille, 30, left the restaurant but was found by officers several streets away. 
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Video: Police allegedly left a “bait truck” filled with Nike shoes in a black Chicago neighborhood

Video: Police allegedly left a “bait truck” filled with Nike shoes in a black Chicago neighborhood | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A partly open truck loaded with Nike Air Force 1 sneakers and Christian Louboutin shoes reportedly showed up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago last week. Local activists say it was a “bait truck” placed by law enforcement to lure would-be thieves to their arrest. The truck was parked near a basketball court and traveled to other sites in the predominantly black community on the city’s southwest side, according to Charles Mckenzie of the crime prevention group God’s Gorillas. 
Rob Duke's insight:

More de-policing of American neighborhoods.

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Police receive new training for a new era through Claremont Graduate University program –

Police receive new training for a new era through Claremont Graduate University program – | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It wasn’t the stuff of viral videos or the kind of action that grabs headlines. But this course, now in its second year, promises to become a significant step forward in helping this nation navigate out of our quagmire of disbelief, disgust and distrust.

“The image of the police has changed from being people who help you to people you are afraid of,” acknowledges Lipman-Bluman, author of “The Allure of Toxic Leaders.” “These are people who truly made a choice to devote their lives to public service.”

Participants included officers from Los Angeles, Tustin, San Bernardino County, Hermosa Beach, Newport Beach, Pomona, Ontario, Ventura, Palm Springs, Santa Monica, Westminster, Beverly Hills, Alhambra, Montclair.

The list goes on and takes in Northern California as well as Arizona. Next year, it is expected to be even more widespread.

Rather than having what Lipman-Bluman calls “authoritarian leadership,” police — and the world, she adds — need what the professor calls “connective leadership.”
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Deputy's graphic Facebook post describing fight with suspect goes viral

Deputy's graphic Facebook post describing fight with suspect goes viral | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A West Virginia sheriff's deputy has posted a harrowing account of her fight with a suspect on Facebook in order to, as she puts it, to give a swift kick in the ass to a lot of cops.
Rob Duke's insight:

A lot of veteran cops are thinking, you should have shot this guy.  And, just because you didn't, doesn't give you a right to castigate those who have done so in similar situations.  The photos of her condition after the fight are horrifying and go way beyond objective reasonableness in terms of justification for the use of deadly force.  It looks like she was lucky to be alive.

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Ninth Circuit panel unanimously backs lawsuit against San Jose police who stood by and watched attacks on Trump supporters

Ninth Circuit panel unanimously backs lawsuit against San Jose police who stood by and watched attacks on Trump supporters | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Normally, suing police for failing to prevent crime is not allowed by courts.  But a three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has just allowed a lawsuit against the City of San Jose and its police department to proceed, despite this general presumption (called "qualified immunity") that police cannot be held responsible for failing to prevent crime.
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Ohio police chief champions heroin epidemic in U.S. and abroad

Ohio police chief champions heroin epidemic in U.S. and abroad | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police Chief Tom Synan of little Newtown has captured the world stage taking on the opioid epidemic. Here's who he is and how he's doing it.
Rob Duke's insight:

The sub-headline reads: He's a Marine; He's a cop's cop; but he's willing to break the rules to save lives.

 

This IS the "Big Question" of the class.  Should cops be allowed to "break" the rules?  Is that just part of discretion, or is it part of the definition of corruption that one breaks the rules?

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Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Highland Park, Mich., police responded to reports that a woman was threatening people and breaking windows at the Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church on June 24. Upon arrival police officers learned that the woman also assaulted a 13-year-old girl visiting from Virginia. The officers met with the church’s pastor, the Rev. David Bullock, in the …
Rob Duke's insight:

I can see both sides of this issue--what do you think?

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LAPD sent 5 officers to provide security for the wedding of Wesson's son

Staffers for two of L.A.’s most prominent politicians were united in marriage last year, celebrating the occasion with dozens of others at the historic Ebell of Los Angeles.

The groom was Justin Wesson, son of City Council President Herb Wesson, who employs him as an aide. The bride was Alexis Marin, a staffer for Councilwoman Nury Martinez, who serves on Wesson’s leadership team.

Turns out taxpayers were involved as well, paying $2,768 to have the Los Angeles Police Department provide security at the September 2017 event, according to information provided Thursday by the LAPD. Four police officers and a sergeant spent a combined 38 hours staffing the event, said Josh Rubenstein, an LAPD spokesman.

The city was not reimbursed for the security costs, Rubenstein said. The LAPD spokesman also issued a statement saying the officers were sent to protect the politicians who went to the wedding — a group that included Mayor Eric Garcetti and other elected officials.

“Upon learning of the event involving Justin Wesson and Alexis Marin, the Los Angeles Police Department decided to provide a small contingent of on-duty personnel to ensure the safety and security of a number of prominent elected officials, who were attending as guests,” the statement said.

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Eyewitness Identification Reform

Eyewitness Identification Reform | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mistaken Identifications are the Leading Factor In Wrongful Convictions
Mistaken eyewitness identifications contributed to approximately 71% of the more than 350 wrongful convictions in the United States overturned by post-conviction DNA evidence.
• Inaccurate
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Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
From LehighValleyLive.com:  The video released to lehighvalleylive.com of the shootout between Daniel Clary and two Pennsylvania state police troopers shows how quickly a routine traffic stop can turn into a life or death struggle. Daniel Clary, left, and Seth Kelly Northampton County First Deputy District Attorney Terence Houck released the video to demonstrate exactly that point. He released it …
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Fredericton shooting: 2 police officers among 4 killed in Canada city

Fredericton shooting: 2 police officers among 4 killed in Canada city | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two police officers were among four people killed in a shooting in Fredericton, New Brunswick, police in the Canadian provincial capital said Friday.
Rob Duke's insight:

Criminal behavior and the way the police react to it is surprisingly uniform across time and space.  What does this tell us?  It might be institutions that dictate behavior (norms, rules, culture, etc.) and not as much individual intentions as we might like to think....

 

This very tragic case from Canada could be a headline drawn from the U.S.

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Two Newark Police Officers Suspended for Failing to Act

Two Newark Police Officers Suspended for Failing to Act | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two Newark police officers have been suspended after a video of a teen jumping on a police car went viral over the weekend.
Rob Duke's insight:

Ug! What are officers to do?  Taze the guy and get sued and on Youtube; wait for him to come down and get suspended....

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How to Tell Your Team That Organizational Change Is Coming

From time to time, every leader has to deliver news that is hard for employees to hear. Even when businesses are doing well, organizational and structural change is to be expected, and acquisitions, reorganizations, or policy changes can affect people’s jobs in ways that create feelings of fear, anger, or sorrow. Each employee wonders, “How will this change affect me?” or assumes, “Oh, this won’t be good! How am I going to get my work done?”

Announcements like these can be daunting. And they go awry if they’re insufficiently planned or poorly delivered. But by attending to the following crucial components, leaders can be ready to communicate the news in ways that will help recipients adjust well and recover as quickly as possible.

Plan more time than you ever thought necessary to prepare the content, the delivery, and the necessary follow-up. Typically, you should expect to hold not just one initial “all hands” meeting or videoconference, but also a series of smaller team and individual conversations as follow-ups. As one of my clients was going through a series of organizational changes, a valued middle manager reacted negatively in each town hall, asking inappropriately detailed questions as if it was a game of “gotcha,” to show that the ramifications hadn’t been fully considered. Once his boss made clear that he would have the opportunity for continuing formal and informal discussions, the manager kept himself in check and was able to offer specific suggestions to improve implementation.

Also, take pains to coordinate announcements so that no one is caught flat-footed if the news is being released at different intervals by individual managers and organization-wide outlets. It may feel like you’re overinvesting in planning, but it will save you time and pain in the long run. Giving people multiple opportunities to take in and process the announcement is essential for thorough understanding; receiving the information from the right sources in the right sequence is crucial for credibility.

Equip all levels of management to explain the context. Provide training and rehearsal or role-play time to everyone who will need to communicate the message; don’t assume they’ll have the right instincts. Otherwise, to escape their own discomfort, they may dump the news or blame management, either directly or indirectly.

One client’s executive team had to do significant repair when frontline managers announced to their teams that there would be a cutback in bonuses because “they said you didn’t do enough,” rather than explaining the reasons for the results and the plans already under way to improve those results for the future. Employees who had worked as hard as they could were frustrated and resentful, and were untrusting of senior management for some time thereafter.

Describe the organizational pain, and how the new solution alleviates it. Instead of just announcing a disruptive change, give the background of what’s not working today and why the new plan is the best way to get to the desired outcome. Focus on how customers have been hurt, how the business is incurring extra expense, the negative brand impact — and how the change will help mitigate those problems. When one client had to consolidate multiple operations to increase efficiency and reduce time to market, it was clear that there wouldn’t be room for all the incumbent leaders. It helped to review the shared history and the acknowledged pain points.

Personalize both the impact and the resolution. If you don’t, employees may not understand which specifics apply to them, or even how the company is providing support or services to help them cope. For example, in the small group or individual meetings, come prepared with all the necessary details to be able to answer personal questions immediately, rather than creating even more anxiety and aggravation while you assign someone to work out the specifics you didn’t research in advance. When one client changed its health plans to keep costs down, it helped covered employees research their doctors’ eligibility and find new practitioners when necessary. The employees were grateful for the individual attention and support, and were subsequently less resentful even though items such as deductibles and co-pays had gotten more expensive.

Give the affected people as many options and as much participation as you can. When they have choices — and the necessary information or support to make them — employees feel more respected and maintain more pride and autonomy. The closer people are to the work, the more likely it is that they’ll generate practical ideas. At one organization that was having some financial difficulties, we facilitated a series of meetings about cost-cutting measures that let everyone look for ways to help out — even though they were adversely affected by some of the very measures they proposed.

And don’t assume you know what’s best for each individual or what they might choose. When a client company was absorbed into a larger operating unit, some deeply committed HR executives stayed till the bitter end, providing outplacement for their colleagues despite knowing that by the time they looked for jobs themselves, the best opportunities would already have been filled.

Demonstrate humility and responsibility, not just authority. Many leaders mistakenly believe that they’ll be given a pass for shaking up people’s lives if they say they’re suffering over the decision or the disruption themselves. Even treating the problem as a shared responsibility can backfire and feel manipulative to employees. Instead, say things like, “I’m sorry I didn’t anticipate…” or, “I was too enthusiastic about x…” to show that you take seriously the impact of the situation on others. You can’t prepare for every curveball, so if you don’t have the answer to a question, say something like, “Wow, that’s a question we didn’t think about, but it’s a good one. We’ll get back to everyone with an answer early next week.” Don’t try to fake your way through.

You can use this kind of planned approach to get the most mileage out of your organization’s good news, recognizing that everyone won’t necessarily perceive the good news as being good for them personally. It can feel unnecessarily painstaking to take the time to plan and then work through all the details with your employees. But knowing you’ve done everything you could to help them withstand challenges and move ahead will make it much more satisfying when you finally achieve the desired results.

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Please, son, don't grow up to become a cop

Please, son, don't grow up to become a cop | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
People have decided the problem isn't thugs and crime and disrespect and non-compliance. They've decided the problem is the police.
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LA Sheriff Says He Won't Tolerate 'Renegade Cliques.' Here's The Backstory On Secret Societies

LA Sheriff Says He Won't Tolerate 'Renegade Cliques.' Here's The Backstory On Secret Societies | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Sheriff's Department has long been the target of allegations that some of its deputies belong to secret, racist cliques. The sheriff has pledged to get to the bottom of it.
Rob Duke's insight:

Young cops like to get tattoos and they often get matching tattoos and call themselves stupid names like "the warriors".  In my mind that is not the same as having secret Klan meetings.  My advice is don't put that type of tattoo on your skin, but I understand why it happens.  This is the reason why it's a bad idea.

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Police usually wait days before interviewing officers in shootings. A new study says they shouldn’t. - The

Police usually wait days before interviewing officers in shootings. A new study says they shouldn’t. - The | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In the hours after a police officer shoots someone, here’s something investigators usually don’t do: interview the officer.

For years, the accepted wisdom in the police community has been that the officer should be given time to calm down from the traumatic event and that full sleep cycles once or twice before an interview will enhance his or her recall of the episode. Some jurisdictions have rules or laws mandating a waiting period, and some departments have reached similar agreements with police unions.

“Officers should have some recovery time before providing a full formal statement,” the International Association of Chiefs of Police states in its “Officer-Involved Shooting Guidelines.” The guidelines say, “An officer’s memory will often benefit from at least one sleep cycle prior to being interviewed leading to more coherent and accurate statements.”

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But a new study of 87 veteran police officers, some interviewed immediately after active-shooter training and some two days after the training, could start to change that thinking. “We did not find any evidence,” wrote criminologists Geoff Alpert, Louise Porter and Justin Ready, “that delay improves either recall or cognitive capability that could indicate enhanced ability to respond to questioning.”
Rob Duke's insight:

I was always interviewed right after my shootings.  I'd say waiting until the next day is better, but this is another one that goes back and forth.

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As deputy faces manslaughter charges, there’s debate over policy of shooting at cars | The Modesto Bee

As deputy faces manslaughter charges, there’s debate over policy of shooting at cars | The Modesto Bee | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Deputy Justin Wall will make his first court appearance Monday on charges of voluntary manslaughter for fatally shooting a woman who led deputies on a pursuit in 2017.

Wall shot Evin Olsen Yadegar as she began to drive around a patrol vehicle after briefly stopping in a Ripon neighborhood.

Wall is far from the first law enforcement officer, including a handful in Stanislaus County in the past decade, to fire upon a suspect in a moving vehicle. But many experts agree shooting at or into a vehicle is dangerous and ineffective.

In fact, it is the policy of the Sheriff’s Department and other local law enforcement that officers should move away from the vehicle instead of firing at its occupants.
Rob Duke's insight:

Training has gone back and forth on this, so I can see it being a confusing area for officers.  The bottom line is that if he can articulate feeling fear for himself or someone else, then the jury will probably acquit, but it will be critical to know why all those other cops didn't fire their guns.  Maybe they were inclined to do so, but didn't due to cross-fire fears or background housing, etc., but maybe they didn't feel threatened--those factors will also influence a jury.

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