Police Problems and Policy
11.0K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Are blacks to blame for cops' actions?

Are blacks to blame for cops' actions? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When a white cop kills an unarmed black man, many blacks see a pattern of prejudice that generates official suspicion, hostility and abuse based on skin color. Many whites, however, say it's the fault of blacks. If they weren't committing so much crime, they wouldn't get so much attention from police.
more...
No comment yet.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

You’ve Been Arrested. Will You Get Bail? Can You Pay It? It May All Depend On Your Judge.

You’ve Been Arrested. Will You Get Bail? Can You Pay It? It May All Depend On Your Judge. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Graphics by Ella Koeze Quantitative analysis by Mai Nguyen When Dawud Moore heard he’d been assigned bail, he felt relieved. It was January 2015, and Moore, a b…
Rob Duke's insight:

This is one of Muir's subtler points: coercive power is just one facet of power.  We tend to focus on the police, but the power associated with persuasion, which includes aspects of the prosecution and judicial systems, are just as problematic in terms of equality.  Muir's point is that whenever we analyze power, we must also include persuasive power and the power of reciprocity (trade or politics...or simply media influence), because these are often used in ways that are just as abusive as is coercive power.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

California Today: ‘This Is Not Your Grandfather’s L.A.P.D.’ - The New York Times

California Today: ‘This Is Not Your Grandfather’s L.A.P.D.’ - The New York Times | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It’s been a long time since Los Angeles was ruled by its Police Department, when its chief was more powerful than the mayor, when its officers were mostly white men who patrolled poor, minority neighborhoods in the style of an occupying military.

Even as police shootings in the city remain stubbornly high, and many poor black and Latino residents, especially young men, still complain about heavy-handed tactics, the force has become gentler in recent times, and its demographics more reflective of the city.

Much of that change can be attributed to the work of Connie Rice, a prominent civil rights lawyer who began suing the L.A.P.D. in the late 1980s and in more recent years has worked closely with chiefs to push forward reforms.
more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 19, 5:33 PM
That is cool Connie is trying to make a difference and make it more fair for the latino and black young men who may be victim to heavy-handed tactics simply because of their demographic. I like that the demographic of police has become more reflective of the city's demographic as well, I think that's important in preventing this in the future.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Supreme Court asked to shield Calif. deputy who killed 13-year-old carrying pellet gun | National | heraldcourier.com

WASHINGTON — It was an October afternoon when 13-year-old Andy Lopez, wearing shorts and a blue sweatshirt, walked down a sidewalk in Santa Rosa, Calif., loosely carrying at his side
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Are Traffic Stops a Pretext for Racial Profiling?

Are Traffic Stops a Pretext for Racial Profiling? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
What were the outcome of these types of searches?

Strangely—and this might initially appear surprising—populations who are more likely to be searched are also more likely to be let off with a warning or no action. And white, middle-class drivers are more likely to get a ticket. It would seem counterintuitive to most readers, but if you're objectively breaking the law—you're speeding or you run through a stop sign—you deserve to get a ticket. The officers will only pull you over after they observe you clearly violating the traffic code in an important way. Then they're going to give you a ticket and let you go on your way. And that's typically what happens to white drivers.

Black drivers are more likely to get warnings, overall. That seems like a good outcome, but the question in these cases is why did he or she get pulled over in the first place? Perhaps the reason was just that the officer had a vague suspicion and a desire to do a little bit of an investigation. So they stopped the person based on some kind of pretext, they investigated by starting a conversation with the driver, and [since nothing turned up], they said, “Well, thank you for your time. I pulled you over because you were speeding by five miles an hour. I just wanted to let you know to be more careful next time.”

So you’re saying that in the cases of white motorists, it might be that they are more often given traffic tickets because there's actually a concrete, observable evidence of a traffic offense. But in many cases of motorists of color, perhaps there is a less clear reason for the stop, so they may actually not end up being penalized through tickets.

Yes. There are two reasons for a traffic stop. One is a violation of the traffic law and the other, a desire by the officer to investigate a person because they they think that they might be a suspect. So if you're a person like me, a white middle-class male, there's no reason the officer is going to develop a suspicion. So the only reason why he might pull me over if he observes me violating an important part of the traffic code, like running through a stop. A traffic stop leading to a ticket is really what should occur if the traffic stop is being used to enforce the traffic code, not as a tool for a criminal investigation.
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, June 18, 12:16 PM
Gosh, you think? I do appreciate the way that this article lays out the numbers and statistics on this topic. I find it highly interesting that white drivers are more likely to get tickets due to there being a concrete infraction, as opposed to the warnings that minorities may receive due to the stop being based on race to begin with. I think that this is a massive problem, and one of the biggest reasons that officers should be able to genuinely back up the reasoning for a pullover, or have some type of oversight for this that helps to mitigate the number of racially-motivated traffic stops. I think that people are often shocked when white individuals on crime sprees make it "so far" into their crime careers, but it honestly makes sense; these are the people that officers are suspicious of, making their lives that much easier to continue and get away with.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Rock Hill police save man trying suicide on Facebook Live | The Herald

Rock Hill police save man trying suicide on Facebook Live | The Herald | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police in Rock Hill, South Carolina saved a man trying to commit suicide on Facebook Live on May 30, 2018, officials said. A person called 911 to report it and Facebook contacted Rock Hill police.
more...
Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, June 11, 3:45 PM

Thanks be to God and those working for Sherif Office.

Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 19, 5:24 PM
This is an incredible story of a community and organization and police coming together to save a person's life. I can't believe someone would try to commit suicide on FB live but to me it's a very evident cry for help and I'm so impressed with how the police handled it. Nice job!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

With Fewer Police Applicants, Departments Engage in Bidding Wars

With Fewer Police Applicants, Departments Engage in Bidding Wars | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Like many law enforcement agencies, the Utah Highway Patrol has lots of vacancies to fill as officers leave for higher-paying jobs. It also has a lot of competition. Salt Lake City recently announced plans to hire 50 additional officers for its police force. This prompted the city council in nearby Ogden to approve pay raises and extra bonuses for many of its officers as a preemptive measure to thwart departures to the larger department in Salt Lake.

Highway Patrol Col. Mike Rapich has observed what he calls a “wage war” among agencies competing for personnel. “We’re in a really aggressive recruiting effort,” he says, “probably more so than I’ve seen in the 25 years I’ve been with the agency.”
more...
Liam Short's comment, June 13, 2:06 PM
I've talked with many people my age who are on the lookout for where they want to start their careers. From what I have gathered, its not as much the pay that holds people back from pursuing a law enforcement career, but a fear or distrust, either personal or expressed by their parents, of the societal climate surrounding cops at the moment. It appears, or at least the media make it look that way, that is has become more dangerous to be a cop now a days and that even the people you are protecting might come after you. No one wants to work like that.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Sheriff’s Support Group of Altadena Electronic Informer: Los Angeles Sheriff Unveils New Mobile App to Connect with the Community

Sheriff’s Support Group of Altadena Electronic Informer: Los Angeles Sheriff Unveils New Mobile App to Connect with the Community | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is proud to unveil its new and innovative mobile application. The Department is the largest law enforcement agency in the nation to use a mobile application to connect the community with information and resources.

The app, available in the Apple and Android app stores, is free to the public and gives you access to the latest news, photos, videos, events, alerts, and crime information no matter where you are. In addition, the application allows two-way communications using social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. It also includes a special feature for submitting anonymous tips to the Department, and you can file a crime report from the convenience of your Smartphone.
more...
Liam Short's comment, June 13, 2:23 PM
If this became more of a mainstream way of interacting with the community among all police departments there is likely to be a very effective way if raising the views of the public towards police departments and thus increasing their legitimacy.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The policing of black Americans is racial harassment funded by the state | US news | The Guardian

The policing of black Americans is racial harassment funded by the state | US news | The Guardian | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When the police’s job is to uphold a racialized law and order, black people can be arrested just for living their lives
Rob Duke's insight:

As we become more rule bound, this problem gets worse.  Let me illustrate:

1. policy says that you respond to every call;

2. policy says that you treat everyone with respect;

3. policy says that you do everything possible to satisfy the caller.

If you discipline officers for violating these policies even when to do so violates the principles of reasonableness and human dignity, then you get incidents such as those the author notes.

That crusty old cop that tells you there's no way in hell he's arresting the person and that you're not being reasonable has disappeared and replaced by what? Robots that pedantically enforce the law?

I once received a call for a suspicious circumstance described in the call as "suspicious Black man driving up and down the street in a white Jeep, opening and closing mailboxes".  It was the middle of the day, so I suspected it was the mailman.  Sure enough, I patrolled the neighborhood circling in to the caller's address.  I talked to the mailman one street over who confirmed that he'd just been on the caller's street.  SMH.  I didn't tell him why I was there. 

more...
Liam Short's comment, June 8, 5:37 PM
In placing the blame the author has made a mistake. If, as the author admits, the officers are just doing their job, we must ask who they are doing the job for . The answer that the author arrives at is the answer of the system or the government. But that is not where the blame game ends. The government dictated by the will of the people. And the will of the people is that the police come to perform their job when they are called to do so. So if the blame is on the people we must ask why the people want to suppress the Black man. In a society based primarily on empirical evidence, we must then look no further that the logical system of statistics. Statistically it is more likely that a Black man is likely to be committing a crime. The counter claim for this argument would be that these statistics are a perpetuation of statistics from a more racist time, however I would counter that the only person we can change is ourselves and if the Black community wants to end this perpetuated stereotype they need to change the statistics in their favor. This is obviously not an overnight solution, but it is the only one that will end this situation in a just manner.
Devon Smale's comment, June 10, 12:38 AM
I would like to know how the black community goes about changing the statistics in their favor? You must not know what it is like to be treated unfairly solely based on the color of your skin. A clerk followed my daughter and her friend around a store today and told them that if they steal, then she is going to call the cops on them. The problem starts with the caller. The main problem is the caller unlike what the author said. You said that the police come to do their job when called to do so. Okay that is fair, however if the police took time to investigate the situation instead of assuming the worst, then maybe black people would not be a statistic and would start to feel more accepted by society and the police. Injustice is injustice regardless of how the system is made and when people actually take the time to realize that this is an actual problem and come up with a solution instead of mediocre suggestions, problems like this will always be an issue.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Body Cams Demolish the Bad Cops Narrative

Body Cams Demolish the Bad Cops Narrative | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Body Cams Demolish the Bad Cops Narrative ... Three years ago, I was handed a body camera and told to wear it from this day forward. I was one of the few officers that would wear the camera during the early testing phase for a department-wide rollout of body cameras.
Rob Duke's insight:

Not a completely unbiased source....but, I try to include all sides of these issues.

more...
Julia Fisher-Salmon's comment, June 7, 2:27 PM
I can see how this can feel demeaning for the officer, but it is a positive aspect for both parties. It holds both sides of the camera accountable for their actions. I think it also can ensure good behavior for those interacting with police officers, and for police officers themselves. It can be a learning opportunity for police officers to play certain footage back to see if they overreacted to certain situations, or if their behavior was appropriate. I don't know how long the body camera has been enacted but I think it should stay in use.
Kimber A. 's comment, June 10, 5:43 PM
While this obviously is not an unbiased source, it would appear that the trend in body cams showing completely legitimate (and truthful) actions and accounts from officers more so than illegitimate or illegal actions. Obviously, there are a number of factors that go into this (including the knowledge of being recorded in one's actions), but I can see how this maybe would improve some of the tensions between police and the public, even if just a minute amount. It is good to hear, even if the source has their own intentions.
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 14, 2:58 PM
I love this! What a great way to ensure corruption is less likely and benefit everyone- the police and citizens. I agree it is probably not unbiased but in my opinion I don't know who would have a problem with this, unless it's really invading privacy or incredibly expensive.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Jane Fonda Teams With Black Lives Matter Leader To Push Proposed Ballot Measure

Jane Fonda Teams With Black Lives Matter Leader To Push Proposed Ballot Measure | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Academy Award-winning actress Jane Fonda, also known for her decades of political activism, has teamed with a co-founder of Black Lives Matter to promote a proposed ballot measure that would fundamentally transform the largest sheriff’s department in the world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FBI agent accidentally fires gun while dancing at a Denver nightclub

An off-duty FBI agent accidentally fired his gun, striking another patron in the leg, at a Denver nightclub while he was dancing, police said.
Rob Duke's insight:

I hope the disco-DJ had the good sense to play "Staying Alive" as the next song after this one...

more...
Liam Short's comment, June 8, 6:01 PM
Personally I believe handling a firearm while intoxicated ought to have similar penalties to driving while intoxicated and I would be interested in knowing how drunk this agent was. According to the article he didn't even seem to realize that the gun had discharged. Law enforcement agents are made aware of how they ought to handle situations outside of work and how to handle guns. Handling a gun while intoxicated is obviously a very risky thing to do and he knew better.
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 9, 4:28 PM
Hah that's funny Rob! No kidding! I can't believe this happened! It seems obvious that it would not be the best idea to try doing a back flip and dancing with a gun attached to your waist, but maybe that's just me? Glad it wasn't a worse injury in the end!!
Kimber A. 's comment, June 10, 5:46 PM
Oh my gosh, I saw this circling around social media and could not believe the decision-making processes that went into this incident taking place. Firearms and alcohol do not mix, and improperly secured weapons are probably a bad idea as well. All of this is exacerbated by the shooter being an FBI agent- whether real or perceived, there is a certain amount of prestige associated (publicly) with the FBI and their agents, making this incident the cherry on the sundae that has been the FBI's very public and political mistakes in the last year.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Caught On Tape: News Channel Shows Horrific Footage Of Man Stabbing & Killing 2 Policemen In Nicaragua With A Knife! (Both Officers Were Carrying Ak 47's) | Video

Caught On Tape: News Channel Shows Horrific Footage Of Man Stabbing & Killing 2 Policemen In Nicaragua With A Knife! (Both Officers Were Carrying Ak 47's) | Video | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An angry man with a knife, killing and injuring several policemen who carried their weapons like AK 47, after the man kill 2 police officers so they killing the man, the incident took place in a police station in Chontales Nicaragua. - Nicaragua News
Rob Duke's insight:

And, here's why de-escalation is such a bad idea....

It's a graphic video...fair warning.

more...
Devon Smale's comment, June 3, 3:14 PM
I could not tell what was happening as far as why the man was being interviewed with a knife in the first place. Then it looks like the police are trying to stop the man but nobody thinks to use their weapon to stand the man off with a knife. I think that police training went out the window at this point and lack of common sense kicked in because the police were not using their weapons at first and were running away from the man with the knife.
Rob Duke's comment, June 3, 3:19 PM
This is what happens, though, when you don't recognize the threat of a knife. In the U.S., we're trained to de-escalate, but also contact and cover. In C-and-C, there is one contact officer who does the talking and negotiating (usually behind some kind of concealment), then there are at least one "cover" officer that does nothing, but monitor the threat and take action if it looks like it's going to escalate. In the early 1980's, in San Diego, we finally figured out why we had so many officers being killed by suspects--it was because both (or more officers walked up and began talking...often distractedly...until the suspect(s) got the drop on them.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Gregory Hill: Florida jury gives 4 cents to black man killed by police | Miami Herald

Gregory Hill: Florida jury gives 4 cents to black man killed by police | Miami Herald | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
At first, the jury gave the man's family $4. That includes a single dollar for each of Hill's children — aged 7, 10 and 13 — and another dollar for the man's funeral expenses, NBC reported. But the jury found that Hill, who had been drinking at the time, was 99 percent at fault for his own death.

So that $4 was then reduced to just four cents.

Monique Davis, the fiancee of Hill, told NBC that the decision left her feeling shocked.

"My heart just dropped," she said.. "It was like, are y'all serious?"

Phillips lamented that the jury sent the message that they "viewed these childrens' pain as virtually worthless."

"I'd have rather seen a zero," he told NBC, "than have to tell the children that their pain and suffering for losing their father is only a dollar."
more...
Devon Smale's comment, June 3, 3:21 PM
It is hard to really know what happened when there is not video of the actual scene. The police say one thing and the fiance says another so who really knows what happened. I think that the jury is this situation was being cruel for no reason. Even if they did not agree with the finance they did not have to issue $4 dollars and then turn around and make it 4 cents. Regardless of what really happened those children are the ones suffering so the jury did not need to add insult to the injury of those kids being fatherless.
Rob Duke's comment, June 3, 3:29 PM
One idea would be to have malpractice insurance. The courts used this strategy with bedroom fires. The mattress and pillow manufacturers very aptly point out that fire resistant material and soft-cuddly material with which you want to cuddle up and sleep are really pretty incompatible. They suggested the remedy were those mattress tags (under penalty of law do not remove, etc.) warning that mattresses are pretty darn flammable, so be careful. At first the legislature and courts bought this argument, but then the courts started suggesting that if companies could insure for a foreseeable circumstance, then they should do so, especially when the cost of insurance only added a few dollars to each mattress sold. We might try having a high deductible ($200k) policy where cities would pay awards for anything below $200k (so as not to encourage turning cases over to insurance), but also cap policies at something like auto insurance umbrella (or homeowners' policies) with the max payout being $1M per person per incident and $2M total per incident. This would encourage an insurance company to negotiate with this family, for instance, to settle for maybe a million or risk having a jury award $2M. We know from past experience that creating an insurance market increases our data gathering and analysis capabilities and helps us determine what limits risks, then we can reward departments that adopt these "best practices", thus inserting some much-needed self-reflection and risk management in policing.
Jessica Warnement's comment, June 3, 7:30 PM
This article is frustrating in that both the title and the content scream "click bait". It's difficult to ascertain what really happened on the day that Mr. Hill was shot and killed by St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office. Some articles suggest that the jury must have been confused by their jury instructions to have awarded only $4 in damages. Apparently the instructions stated they could award $1 in “nominal damages” to the family, if Mr. Hill’s injuries weren’t clearly the result of unjustifiable force. The Complaint filed by Mr. Hill’s mother, Viola Bryant, sought $15k in damages, alleging in count 22 that “St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office effectively and needlessly employed excessive force to subdue Hill and also effectively destroyed his home”. Confusion by the jury or not, they only found the officers to be 1% responsible for Mr. Hill’s death, determining Mr. Hill to be 99% responsible due to his level of intoxication as reported by the toxicologist. Ultimately, I think the lack of information provided in this article, as well as others, was done intentionally to provoke controversial responses. I would however, like to see how this case fares in the federal appeals process.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

SF man shot a second time by police - by m_barba - June 11, 2018

SF man shot a second time by police - by m_barba - June 11, 2018 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The man shot by police in North Beach minutes after midnight on Saturday had previously been shot by an undercover sergeant who four years later become the acting chief of »
more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 19, 4:52 PM
It's kind of crazy that the same guy would be shot by police more than once, but it sounds like he was dangerous and not innocent in this situation. Had he been innocent this would be ridiculous. I do think the second time called for being shot since he had a gun visible.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

California Judges Association Decries Recall of Judge Aaron Persky

A fair and impartial judiciary free of outside influences is a cornerstone of our democracy. Yet, in response to an intensely politicized and very well-funded campaign, motivated by a visceral reaction against a criminal sentence in a highly charged case, on June 5, Santa Clara County voters recalled Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky. This marked the first recall of a California judge in 86 years since three judges who exploited their positions for personal political and monetary gain were recalled in 1932.

The outrage expressed by recall proponents, over a sentence imposed in 2015, sparked nationwide anger and publicity that overwhelmed reasonable debate about whether a judge who made a lawful but unpopular decision should be subjected to a recall by the voters. The California Judges Association believes that no sitting judge should be exposed to a recall petition under such circumstances, even when the case involves an issue as important as sexual assault on a college campus.

Judges must make decisions every day that are unpopular with one group or another or with politically powerful individuals. Recall by the electorate must be reserved to remedy those rare situations where a judge has committed malfeasance while in office, whether it be unethical or criminal behavior. Judge Persky followed the law, a law which allowed for a probationary sentence. This law troubled the Legislature and now it has been amended to require a state prison sentence.
Rob Duke's insight:

Unfortunately, this is public life.  The cop who uses force knows that their job is on the line every time--the difference?  The cop can lose their job in a matter of days.  At least judges must be subjected to a lengthy recall process.

It's just part of the checks and balance system that all positions with power be reminded from time-to-time that their power can be removed for egregious misconduct.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Dancing FBI agent Chase Bishop charged with 2nd-degree assault, booked into jail over back flip gunfire - CBS News

Dancing FBI agent Chase Bishop charged with 2nd-degree assault, booked into jail over back flip gunfire - CBS News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
DENVER – An FBI agent whose gun appeared to accidentally fire in a video showing him dancing at a Denver nightclub and doing a back flip before dropping the weapon has been booked into jail. Chase Bishop, who is based in the bureau's Washington Field Office, was charged Tuesday with one count of second-degree assault, the Denver District Attorney's office said.

Bishop turned himself in to the Denver Sheriff Department on Tuesday morning after a warrant was issued for his arrest, according to Denver police.


Chase Bishop DENVER POLICE DEPT.
Denver Police had previously said they were awaiting the results of alcohol and drug tests before making an arrest. The district attorney's office said in a statement investigators are still awaiting the tests to determine Bishop's blood alcohol content at the time of the incident, and additional charges may be pending.

"We are filing this charge now rather than waiting until the [blood alcohol content] report is received, which we understand could take another week, because sufficient evidence has been presented to file it," Denver District Attorney Beth McCann said in the statement. "If an additional charge needs to be filed after further evidence is received, we can file those charges then."
more...
Steph McGillivray's comment, June 13, 7:24 PM
This incident just shows how quickly a careless accident can change your life dramatically. I honestly feel bad for this guy because his career and reputation are now compromised. At the same time, he must be held liable for his actions because someone was injured and they could have died if the shot was fired differently. I believe he should at least be suspended or terminated. Reprimanding him is not enough. The agent was careless not to have the gun in a proper holster or have the safety on.
Michael Annunziato's comment, June 16, 1:22 PM
This very unfortunate innocent is nothing more than an accident. Accidents happen. I don't agree at all with Steph or Liam. Mr. Bishop should not be suspended or terminated from the FBI. Agent Bishop was simply having a little fun and unfortunately his service pistol fell from his holster and discharged accidentally. The fact that he was dancing and doing a back flip is not a reason to ruin his career and charge him criminally. He could have been walking down the street and leaned over to pick up a pencil he dropped and his firearm could've slipped from his holster and discharge just like it did in the night club.
Kimber A. 's comment, June 18, 12:11 PM
Michael, while I understand the point you are making regarding it being an accident, I think the alcohol and nightclub factors are what Liam, Steph, myself, and the rest of the world are really focused on. The article openly states that Chase was on vacation, off duty, and those who carry firearms know the legalities of doing so while intoxicated or in places serving alcohol. There was no reason for the agent to be carrying his weapon, especially if drinking, and it will be very interesting to see how the FBI handles everything from here on out. The FBI has been in some pretty hot water in the last year and change, so I think that a lot of eyes are focused on their next moves in light of this recent misadventure. Interestingly, I wonder what societal feedback on this would be if the race or gender of the agent were changed, if not both.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Black Lives Matter Activists Criticize Selection of Moore as LAPD Chief

“This is all pun intended, it’s more of the same. Michel Moore, from our perspective, is another Chief Daryl Gates sort of trained officer within the LAPD that sort of still holds on to this old-school culture that Los Angeles doesn’t need,” Pete White of Black Lives Matter and the Los Angeles Community Action Network told City News Service.
more...
Michael Annunziato's comment, June 16, 1:34 PM
Moore, based on the article, seems to be the best candidate for the job. He has extensive experience, Swat leadership time, and a long distinguished record. BLM is nothing more than a hate driven racially bias cult of people with the mission to divide and disrupt. They have no premise to object to this possible appoint. They cite an innocent that Moore was involved in that led to the shooting death of a minority but they fail to mention that that suspect had shot and killed Moore's wife and then tried to kill Moore. BLM needs to go away. We shouldn't be listening to anything they have to say. They have completed destroyed all their integrity and logical reasoning skills.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

L.A. Police Use of Deadly Force Up, Killings Down

L.A. Police Use of Deadly Force Up, Killings Down | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Despite new policies to reduce police shootings, use of deadly force by Los Angeles police increased slightly in 2017 from the previous year, but the number of fatal shootings continued a downward trend, reports the Los Angeles Times. The number of shootings by L.A. officers increased to 44 from 40 in 2016, said a report to the Police Commission. Of the 44 incidents, 31 people were hit by gunfire. The 17 people who were killed by police represented a slight decrease from 19 in 2016. Officers killed 21 people in 2015. Last year, Latinos represented 58 percent of those shot by police and whites 29 percent. African Americans were 13 percent of those shot, a significant drop from 2016, when nearly a third of police shooting victims were black. Nearly half of those shot by police last year were armed.
Rob Duke's insight:

An increase of 4 in one year is probably a matter of chance.  We'd need more time to determine what impact policy and training is having.  You have a long-term study in your articles that suggests that a focus on policy by Administration, does cause officers to change their behavior.

more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 14, 2:28 PM
That is a good point, hard to judge based on just a year worth of evidence/stats. I guess its good they are killing less people but still deadly force is being used which is still not ideal. I hate to see anyone innocently killed or treated forcefully if not warranted.
Michael Annunziato's comment, June 16, 1:42 PM
First of all, there isn't enough data to show any real difference is being made. The lack of data and time is cause to disregard these findings as a whole. I don't believe officers are looking to use their service pistols as a first option to resolving situations. I believe, based on some first hand experience and knowing officers personally, that officers use every option available and every way they can to resolve potentially dangerous situations without using deadly force. This data also shows that what we constantly hear in the main stream media is not accurate. Whites are shot at more than twice the rate as blacks and latinos are twice as whites.
Kimber A. 's comment, June 18, 12:21 PM
I definitely agree that there is not enough data in general to support any claim; I am taking Research Methods this semester as well, and can pretty much guarantee this study would not hold up in that class either! I would like to see a long-term study as well as a comparison to the other stats that may not be considered when generating headlines like this, or other more inflammatory article titles.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

California officer gets 7 years in sex assault while on duty | The Sacramento Bee

A former Southern California police officer has been sentenced to more than seven years in prison for sexually assaulting three women while on duty — forcing each of them to expose themselves and fondling two of them during traffic stops.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office says a judge sentenced Israel Sanchez to seven years and eight months in prison on Tuesday. Sanchez also must register as a lifetime sex offender.

In March, a jury deliberated for less than five hours before finding the 42-year-old Sanchez guilty of 14 felonies, including sexual battery, assault under color of authority and false imprisonment by violence.
Rob Duke's insight:

Corrupt cop? Burn them down....when one tarnishes the badge, it impacts us all.

more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 14, 2:35 PM
This is appauling! Unfortunately there is corruption in this world but I'm glad they are not taking this lightly. It's messed up he used his power and authority to do such an act, I sure hope this is rare! I agree though it
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Homicide Survivors need support as violent crime rates hit 20-year high in Alabama

Homicide Survivors need support as violent crime rates hit 20-year high in Alabama | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - More violent crime is happening in Alabama now than in the past two decades. That means a lot more people hurting others, but also more victims than there has been for a while. We are used to seeing convicted criminals in the news after they receive their sentences.
Rob Duke's insight:

File this under Moral Panics and Folk Devils:

 

When you see a headline like this, always ask:

1. How much was the change?  Time-forecasting is an inexact probability calculation, so unless it's a big jump, be skeptical.

2. What other factors might explain the change?  Did ambulance, fire, or medical services or insurance change in some way?  In the past, we've had to abandon theory, such as the idea that there was a "Southern" culture of violence, when we compared the level of medical care.  In other words, what would be an assault in Los Angeles, might result in a murder in a rural area simply because they have fewer trauma centers.

 

A free media is fine, but they have incentives to sensationalize headlines and only need to verify with one primary source and a second source (that could remain anonymous), or even a couple "sources close to the administration".  That's why we treat these sources of info as inferior to edited books and peer-reviewed journals (law, medical, academic journals).

more...
Julia Fisher-Salmon's comment, June 7, 2:17 PM
It's interesting to see how society is locking people up at the rate they are, yet are still working towards getting widespread mental health clinicians accessible to everyone. I think it's a positive step towards recovery for the victims of this heinous issue in Alabama, yet it makes you wonder why behavioral health aides aren't more accessible to those in prison. I've never worked in that kind of atmosphere where I'm sure it's very hostile and violent, but my optimism let's me believe that it might be effective to have clinicians in the prisons.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How data-driven policing threatens human freedom - Open Future

How data-driven policing threatens human freedom - Open Future | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“Minority Report”, a 2002 film directed by Steven Spielberg, features a squad of police officers who arrest people for murders they are predicted to commit. The film was science fiction; yet police departments around the world increasingly use predictive analytics to identify people who might become perpetrators or victims of crime.
Rob Duke's insight:

I read the book over Spring Break and wasn't impressed that anything new had been revealed.

There are problems taking any data at face value, but to say that crime victims are reporting their crimes in a manner that drives biased policing is a stretch.

more...
Liam Short's comment, June 8, 6:16 PM
I'm not entirely sure how the calculations are performed for these particular sets of numbers, however it seems wrong to be able to simply be able to predict a large number of peoples actions based on other people's past deeds. One of the tools that police officers have is the ability to actually go out and talk and interact with the public and get a feel for individuals. Numbers can't do that they can tell you the likely hood of someone becoming violent, however it is based on so many factors that this can hardly be that accurate. Accuracy of this system is another answer I would want answered about this system.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police Transparency Bill Sails Through California Senate

Aiming to pry open law enforcement records, California lawmakers on Wednesday passed a measure that would improve public access to information about officers guilty of wrongdoing and those involved…
Rob Duke's insight:

California, Michigan, New York, and Texas are the indicator states of trends in Justice.  When you see one of these 4 states make a major policy change, look for that change in your state within the next few years....

more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 9, 4:11 PM
Oh I did not realize those 4 states have such an influence. I think this bill makes sense in some ways but also the amount of money it would cost almost doesn't seem worth it. I mean it is too bad if police are in the wrong and do not get caught but there are also lots of other problems we could put our money and energy into that may be more beneficial in the end.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Berlin Cathedral: Police officer shoots 'rampaging' man in leg

Berlin Cathedral: Police officer shoots 'rampaging' man in leg | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A knife-wielding 53-year-old Austrian man is shot in the leg during a rampage in the building.
more...
Sabrina Hallmark's comment, June 9, 4:20 PM
I think it's interesting you just quoted the part about a knife-wielding man being shot in the leg because I think it's an example of possible extreme measures on the part of police. On one hand the police officer was just taking precautionary measures but on the other hand it seems a bit much to use a gun when the Austrian man didn't have one.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Georgia Cop Fired After Video Shows Him Hitting A Suspect With His Car

Georgia Cop Fired After Video Shows Him Hitting A Suspect With His Car | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police Officer Taylor Saulters claimed the suspect ran into his car and bounced off.
more...
Devon Smale's comment, June 3, 3:16 PM
Honestly I have seen several videos were it is clearly obvious that the police were in the wrong but with this video it is hard to tell whether the man jumped on the car because it was coming at him or if the police car actually hit him. I wish that someone was recording this video from the other side, so that I can clearly see what happened. Either way it did seem excessive for the minor infractions that the suspect had.
Rob Duke's comment, June 3, 3:21 PM
I also didn't see what the suspect was being sought for...if this is a minor offense, then it's too much force, but if the guy were fleeing a murder scene, that bump would probably be reasonable.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Starbucks Anti-Bias Training “Missed the Mark Completely,” Say Two Philly Baristas –

Starbucks Anti-Bias Training “Missed the Mark Completely,” Say Two Philly Baristas – | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two local employees of color say Tuesday’s training served only to make them uncomfortable and increase racial tensions.
more...
Dalston's comment, June 4, 3:26 AM
I am honestly not surprised that they completely missed the mark because it takes more than a day to teach someone how not be racist. This was actually more infuriating than it was a relief because they never spoke about it as a wrong doing and thought they could sooth people with a pointless class. To make people sit down and watch videos that make them uncomfortable is just disrespectful and whoever was in charge of that idea needs to some disciplinary action because that does not ensure that a situation like this won't happen again.
Julia Fisher-Salmon's comment, June 7, 1:21 PM
I'm not surprised by the way Starbucks chose to handle the situation. It's very similar to how most American's deal with the "uncomfortable" history of people of color. Which is through looking at issues other than the one at hand, and reversing the blame unto the people of color. Making it seem as though there was no wrong actually done, it's just the people of color dramatizing the situation. Look at the entire history of Native Americans, genocide? No of course not, it was just what was happening in the world at the time.. colonization is normalized for this era of history yet entire populations were mass murdered. It's that blatant white supremacist mentality, in which Starbucks is guilty of in this situation. They should have taken the responsibility that they felt unsafe in the store because of the color of those men's skin color. All around disappointed, but not surprised.
Devon Smale's comment, June 10, 12:57 AM
Even though Starbucks missed the mark completely, at least they were attempting to do something about the situation. It was not at all what needed to take place, but other companies where racial issues have been in the press, do nothing. Doing nothing is just as bad as what happened at this training, but I think that if those people who were interviewed expressed their concerns to the women who were holding the meeting, then maybe things could have turned around. If I was a Starbuck's employee, I would have been outraged, but my complaints would not have been kept a secret. I would have let the women, who were leading the meeting, know that what they are doing is not acceptable and that the focus needs to be on the situation at hand and not videos of police brutality. I would have also expressed my concerns to the CEO who was all over the news over the outrage of the Philadelphia situation, and let him know that while his attempts to change racism does not go unnoticed, the training missed the mark completely and something else needs to be done. If nothing changed then I would not work for Starbuck's. People do not want to get uncomfortable to deal with racial issues because it doesn't happen to them. If white people became a daily target of injustice and prejudice, then things would start to change, but since that doesn't happen often, we need to keep making people uncomfortable until that change happens.