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San Bernardino police, firefighters seek to sue bankrupt city - Reuters

San Bernardino police, firefighters seek to sue bankrupt city Reuters RIVERSIDE, Calif., Feb 12 (Reuters) - San Bernardino's police and firefighters unions will ask a judge later this week to let them sue the bankrupt city over pay and benefit...
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Amy Carlson's comment, February 13, 2013 2:11 PM
The fact that the police officer’s salary and benefits have been cut is sad and must be hard to deal with. I know similar pay cuts are happening in police departments around the country. But I think this country is just so quick to sue; Americans sue for everything these days. If the city is bankrupt, what good is suing going to do anyways? The article says, “The bankruptcy could be a test case as to whether the pensions of government workers take precedence over other payments in a municipal bankruptcy." This city and how it’s ran sounds unorganized and messy. I personally would not want to be a police officer working in San Bernardino.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant

Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant
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IPRA report advises firing of 2 CPD officers involved in 2016 shooting

IPRA report advises firing of 2 CPD officers involved in 2016 shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A now-defunct Chicago police oversight agency says two officers who fired shots at a moving vehicle during a chase in 2016 that ended in the death of a black teen should lose their jobs.
Rob Duke's insight:
Yeah, pretty predictable.....not that these guys can't be cops again, but this department has to fire them.
Maybe they can rehab as volunteers somewhere for a couple years and then come back working in a more rural setting.
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Did ‘Repressed Memory’ Falsely Convict Jerry Sandusky?

Did ‘Repressed Memory’ Falsely Convict Jerry Sandusky? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Author Mark Pendergrast claims the former Penn State defensive football coach was a victim of “media frenzy” and a distorted use of repressed memory which led to his conviction for child sex abuse. In a conversation with TCR about his new book, he explains why he believes Sandusky should get a new trial.
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Watch the LAPD videos of a controversial police shooting on skid row that have been kept secret for years

Watch the LAPD videos of a controversial police shooting on skid row that have been kept secret for years | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Millions watched social media video of this controversial skid row police shooting. But The Times obtained never-before-released footage from Los Angeles police body cameras that show a new perspective.
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Inmate accused of killing corrections officers had homemade key hidden | Atlanta: News, Weather and Traffic

Inmate accused of killing corrections officers had homemade key hidden  | Atlanta: News, Weather and Traffic | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
WSB: Atlanta's News, Weather and Traffic
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A pat-down always includes an inspection of the hair and even the seems of garments where small objects, such as blades and keys, may be hidden.
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Jail Guards Found Guilty of Killing Inmate Receive Sentences

Three Santa Clara County jail deputies found guilty of second-degree murder in the beating death of inmate Michael Tyree have been sentenced to 15 years to life, a judge ruled Friday.
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Shuck the Police: Are We Done with Traditional Law Enforcement? - Los Angeles Review of Books

Shuck the Police: Are We Done with Traditional Law Enforcement? - Los Angeles Review of Books | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ultimately, however, though Vitale comes closer to getting it than Ferguson, both authors miss something central: the reason why a clearly injurious policing paradigm continues as it does isn’t because we don’t understand that it is broken. It’s because policing as an institution is working as fully intended, i.e., to suppress black, brown, and poor lives, contain their political emergence, channel public funds toward an array of favored private contractors, and perhaps to absorb surplus male aggression. Per the cybernetician Stafford Beer’s dictum that “the purpose of a system is what it does,” we evidently want our uniformed public servants to punish, to kick ass, and to look a certain way while doing it. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t tolerate any of this.

Which is not to say that there is no worth in supposing that things might be different. If at present the task of defending the public and keeping it free from harm falls to the constabulary force we call “the police,” a formation that is by heritage and conception poorly equipped to answer the challenges it now faces, Ferguson’s and Vitale’s books dare to at least sketch the contours of a different way of doing things.

Where The Rise of Big Data Policing and The End of Policing agree is that we face a rupture in our approach to the maintenance of public order. For Ferguson, that rupture consists in the full-spectrum, persistent awareness afforded by the emergent technics of data collection and analysis, as well as the fact that those tools have been placed in the hands of an institution increasingly inclined to conceive itself as apart from, if not above, the people we suppose it to serve; for Vitale, in the utter bankruptcy of traditional policing methods when applied to social problems, the obscene violence which all too often results, and the all but total lack of accountability for it.
Rob Duke's insight:
The problem is not policing.  The book review suggests that the police were formed to suppress the masses, but this overlooks the view of the victim who lives with the "masses".  There will always be a problem of abuse of power.  The strong tend to prey on the weak.  We choose to institutionalize one body that we give the legitimate monopoly on the use of force because we can nominally and marginally control this power.  We cannot control the neighborhood bully (thug, gang, cartel, mob, etc.), but we can control the police.  I know there's a lot of hand waving here, but it's much easier to relieve an officer of duty than it is to relieve a gang member of command--even when arrested, they often still call the shots from prison.
These authors overlook a line of reasoning that comes down from Gordon Tullock (an economist) and PAJ Waddington.  Namely, that every few generations, we enlarge the definition of "we".  It's quite fine to use force against "them", but it's another to use it against "we or us".  Up til now, the underground economy, the drug addicts, the marginal poor, the excess labor pool, the mentally ill, and the homeless have been clearly defined as "them".  Perhaps because the third industrial revolution has made it easier to track underground economies, perhaps because opinions/norms have changed (white paper by me, 2016), but we're now more comfortable with economic controls on things like cannabis and prostitution and no longer see these as the sole domain of control for the police.
Whatever the cause, we no longer give police a complete monopoly on the control of these marginal members of society.
What seems clear to me is that we're at a major crossroads for reform.  What it looks like is still not clear.  Will it be a centralized police (not likely under our Federalism system)?  Will it be a ban of police as this article suggests (also unlikely as long as the strong prey on the weak)?
My guess is that we're going to continue to have a strong arm of the police that makes more rare appearances; and, at the same time, have the day-to-day police that are weaker and tend to be more representative of the marginal members of society.
What do you think?
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LAPD Officer Shot in 'Ambush-Style Attack': Police

LAPD Officer Shot in 'Ambush-Style Attack': Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles Police Department officer was shot in what police are calling an "ambush-style attack" Friday night in the Westlake District area of central Los Angeles.
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Law enforcement deaths down 10 percent in 2017

Law enforcement deaths down 10 percent in 2017 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
(WTXL) - The number of law enforcement professionals nationwide who died in the line of duty in 2017 dropped to its lowest level in four years, according to the National
Rob Duke's insight:
One year's data does not make a trend, but it's interesting how when our leaders stopped saying it was o.k. to harm the police, the rate at which it seems to be happening has also fallen.

We'll see what happens this year....hope for this trend to continue.
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The misplaced arguments against Black Lives Matter

The misplaced arguments against Black Lives Matter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

ON AUGUST 15th Donald Trump repeated his belief that “both sides” were to blame for the violence on August 12th at a white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia that left one woman dead. David Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan, thanked him for “condemn[ing] the leftist terrorists in BLM,” referring to the Black Lives Matter movement. David Clarke, the sheriff of Milwaukee County and a supporter of Mr Trump, has also called Black Lives Matter “purveyors of hate”, and urged the Southern Poverty Law Centre (SPLC), to include it among the hate groups it monitors. Many on the right share this belief. It is mistaken.

To be sure, some protestors who claim affiliation with BLM have said hateful things. A group outside the Minnesota State Fair chanted, “Pigs in a blanket; fry ‘em like bacon”. The previous night a sheriff’s deputy had been shot in Houston, for which some BLM opponents blame the movement—without evidence. Some have blamed BLM for the fatal car crash in Charlottesville last weekend, saying it happened because BLM supporters were throwing bricks at the car. The movement may have begun with honourable intentions, one argument runs, but it has been “hijacked by a group that hates white people and looks to burn down cities and towns”. And some seem to object to the name, hearing in the phrase “Black lives matter” the implication that other lives do not.

That argument is easily dismissed. Affirming one thing does not negate all else. Donating money to support, say, cancer research does not make one a cheerleader for tuberculosis. Someone who says that black lives matter does not imply that other lives do not—they are simply reminding people that for most of American history black lives have been valued less than white ones. The days of slavery and de jure segregation have mercifully passed, but black Americans remain poorer, less healthy and more likely to be killed by police than whites. You can agree or disagree with BLM’s platform, but nothing in it promotes hatred of any race or group.

Richard Cohen, who heads the SPLC, defines hate groups as “those that vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity”. BLM does not fit the bill: it welcomes white supporters, has condemned violence and addresses structural racial inequities. Jacob Levy, a political philosopher, argues that BLM is “one of the most significant political mobilisations in defence of freedom” in decades. Its supporters oppose police brutality, mass incarceration, America’s drug war, police militarisation and civil-forfeiture abuses. All of those are causes that liberals, libertarians and conservatives—anyone who fears unchecked state power—ought to cheer.

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CHP officer's wife waited until children opened Christmas presents to tell them dad had died

CHP officer's wife waited until children opened Christmas presents to tell them dad had died | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
 California Highway Patrol Officer Andrew Camilleri  lived a life of faith and service in his hometown of Tracy. Not long ago he fulfilled a dream to become a CHP officer
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Swatting case poses legal challenges for police, prosecutors

Swatting case poses legal challenges for police, prosecutors | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Tyler Barriss, 25, was arrested Friday in Los Angeles in connection with the Wichita incident on a fugitive warrant by Wichita police, said Los Angeles Police Officer Mike Lopez. Authorities have not said why they took Barris into custody and what charges, if any, will be filed against Barriss, nor have they said what led to his arrest. They have not publicly identified him as the caller or said if others may be charged.
Authorities said he'd been convicted of phoning in multiple bomb threats to a Los Angeles television station in 2015. Sources have told CNN he was active in the gaming community. Efforts to determine whether Barriss has an attorney were not successful Saturday.
CNN legal analyst Paul Callan said Saturday federal authorities will be involved in the case because the 911 call crossed state lines.
No federal swatting laws exist, but a number of federal charges could be filed, such as obstruction of justice, attempted obstruction and wire fraud. Wire fraud, Callan said, is "a catchall statute for these new crimes that haven't been anticipated."
State authorities could file a homicide charge, he said.
"It might be a reckless homicide because when you do something like this to set up a raid by a SWAT team on an innocent family, you're putting people's lives in danger," he said.
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Activist Erica Garner, 27, dies after heart attack

Activist Erica Garner, 27, dies after heart attack | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Erica Garner -- an activist for social justice and the eldest daughter of the man who died from a police choke hold in New York in 2014 -- died on Saturday morning days after suffering a heart attack, her mother Esaw Snipes said.
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Nationwide, police shot and killed nearly 1,000 people in 2017

Nationwide, police shot and killed nearly 1,000 people in 2017 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Experts said they are uncertain why the annual total shows little fluctuation — the number for 2017 is almost identical to the 995 killed by police in 2015.
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Police Release Video Of Deadly Shooting After Officers Receive Death Threats - Law Officer

Police Release Video Of Deadly Shooting After Officers Receive Death Threats - Law Officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After social media exploded in North Little Rock (AR) over the weekend following an officer involved shooting, Chief Mike Davis released video of the incident. 
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Police Officers Union Ad Rips SFPD Over Leaving Terrorism Task Force

Police Officers Union Ad Rips SFPD Over Leaving Terrorism Task Force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Francisco’s police officer union is running radio ads blasting the police department and city for pulling out of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), claiming the SFPD was not involved in the recent FBI investigation into the alleged Pier 39 terror plot.

San Francisco was the the only big city police department to drop out of the JTTF last February amid concerns the Trump administration would increase surveillance of Muslim communities like the New York City police did after Sept. 11, 2001.
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Colorado pairing police officers with mental health experts 

Co-responders, or behavioral health clinicians, ride with police when they respond to 911 calls and provide follow-up services when officers leave the scene. They also can be a resource for police in deescalating situations before they end tragically, such as the fatal New Year's Eve shooting of a Douglas County deputy responding to a domestic disturbance call.

Maigan Oliver, director of acute and forensic services with Mental Health Partners, which partners with Boulder police to send mental health professionals out on 911 calls, said the Boulder county attorney's office is a big backer of the program.

Sending mental health professionals with police helps defend against litigation over any potential use of force, the county attorney has pointed out, according to Oliver. "If there is ever a case, there is always the question of, 'Did you use every resource available to you?'" Oliver said.

In another strategy, case managers canvass targeted high-crime areas and establish relationships with drug users and prostitutes, even going so far as to sit down with them over coffee. These case managers work with police to keep these offenders off the streets and out of jail.

Mental health and substance-use disorders are growing problems in Colorado, which has the sixth highest suicide rate in the nation. Colorado also consistently ranks in the bottom half of per-capita funding levels in state surveys on behavioral health spending. Colorado's own studies show that nearly 40 percent of Colorado's inmate population needs mental health services and 74 percent needs substance-use disorder services. The state spent more than $94 million in 2013 incarcerating nonviolent drug offenders, according to the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The hope of the new diversion philosophy is to start addressing problems before people become enmeshed in the criminal justice system. Police and clinicians and case managers try to avoid arrests. The thinking is that incarceration disrupts employment and tears families apart, ultimately setting up a cycle of failure that can cause a person to slide even further into crime.
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Man shot, killed by deputies after 911 call claiming woman was trying to kill family

Man shot, killed by deputies after 911 call claiming woman was trying to kill family | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When Mark Parkinson, who lives in the house, finally heard the commotion outside, he got out of bed to see what was going on.

He was armed, looking through a window, and that’s when deputy John Chandler fired a fatal shot.

The victim’s wife, Diana Parkinson, said her husband would have never had the gun out if he had known there were police officers on the property. She said they didn’t know who was there.

“By the time I got into the kitchen, which probably was 30 seconds after he got up, he was already on the floor and had been shot,” Diana Parkinson said.

GBI agents are working to determine whether the 911 call was fake. Right now, they said, they have no evidence to validate an emergency.
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The police won't solve Chicago's violence problem

The police won't solve Chicago's violence problem | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The only way to end the bloodshed is through community strength, ownership and involvement.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a problem with professionalism in policing: we begin to think we have a monopoly on solutions.  In reality, it's always been about building community capacity.  The Chicago sociologists of the 20th century got that right.  If you have an engaged public with good schools, activities for kids and families along with a great jobs-housing mix, then your crime will improve.
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Family of 'swatting' victim wants Kansas officer who fired fatal shot charged

Family of 'swatting' victim wants Kansas officer who fired fatal shot charged | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Justice for the Finch family constitutes criminal charges against the shooting officer and any other liable officers as well as damages against the city of Wichita for the policies and practices of its Police Department," Stroth said.

But criminologist B. Remy Cross at Webster University in Missouri said criminal charges are highly unlikely.

"It is sort of a fact of the world we live in now that it is very difficult to bring charges against police officers unless there is glaring negligence and misconduct," Cross said. "While I certainly sympathize with the family — and I think there was probably not the necessary due caution exercised in this incident — I don't know that they are going to necessarily be very successful in pushing for charges to be brought against the officer."

Police spokesman Charley Davidson said the department has not received Lisa Finch's letter and cannot comment on it. He said police have provided all the information they can at this point, and that the investigation remains active.

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The Latest: Iran news agency says officer slain at protest

The Latest: Iran news agency says officer slain at protest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Latest: Iran news agency says officer slain at protest
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Baltimore pastor on the city's homicide rate: We need police to come back - Hot Air

Baltimore pastor on the city's homicide rate: We need police to come back - Hot Air | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Baltimore had 343 homicides in 2017, a number which set a new record for the most murders per capita in the city’s history. Today NPR published an interesting interview with a Baltimore pastor named Rev. Kinji Scott who says the problem is that police in the city have pulled back in the wake of the Freddie Gray case. Interviewer Lauren Prayer asks Rev. Scott, “After the death of Freddie Gray, yourself, families of victims, didn’t you want police to back off?” Scott replied:

No. That represented our progressives, our activists, our liberal journalists, our politicians, but it did not represent the overall community. Because we know for a fact that around the time Freddie Gray was killed, we start to see homicides increase. We had five homicides in that neighborhood while we were protesting.

What I wanted to see happen was that people would be able to trust the relationship with our police department so that they would feel more comfortable. We’d have conversations with the police about crime in their neighborhood because they would feel safer. So we wanted the police there. We wanted them engaged in the community. We didn’t want them beating the hell out of us, we didn’t want that.

It’s interesting that Scott blames progressives and liberal journalists for demanding police back off but says that’s not what most people in the community really wanted. You sometimes hear that argument from conservatives but it never seems to carry much weight when they say it. Now that Scott is saying it will anyone listen?

Rob Duke's insight:
This pastor was in a no-win situation as the activist playbook is to undermine existing power sources in order to create a vacuum of leadership, which they plan to exploit and fill.  Were he not to have joined the marches, he, too, would have been marginalized.  Thus, he smartly participated and bided his time until a majority of the people are finally ready to demand that the police return.

See Saul Alinsky's "Rules for Radicals".
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In Sacramento, a Plan to Strengthen Miranda Rights for Juveniles

In Sacramento, a Plan to Strengthen Miranda Rights for Juveniles | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Lawmakers will vote on a bill that would require youth 15 and younger to consult an attorney before an interrogation.
Rob Duke's insight:
Bad facts make bad case law.  This was a terrible set of facts that don't happen every day, but I'm sure the legislature is thinking "not even once".....
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Does the LEOSA Carry Law Apply to You?

Does the LEOSA Carry Law Apply to You? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In law enforcement, a lot of the recent scuttlebutt focuses on off-duty and retired officer carry laws, covering what you can and cannot do under the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA).
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Judge rejects settlement for man fatally shot by Pasco police

Judge rejects settlement for man fatally shot by Pasco police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

PASCO, Wash. (AP) — The family of a man shot to death after throwing rocks at police can't agree on who should receive a $750,000 settlement.

So, the Tri-City Herald reports , a judge has rejected the offer and placed the civil case on hold for four months while the lawyers of Antonio Zambrano-Montes' family work out an agreement.

Court documents say Zambrano-Montes died in February 2015 after officers shot at him 17 times. Zambrano-Montes, who was high on methamphetamine, was throwing rocks at police and passing cars.

An autopsy found he was shot five to seven times.

The lawsuit was filed against the city of Pasco, the Pasco Police Department, Chief Bob Metzger and officers Ryan Flanagan, Adam Wright and Adrian Alaniz.

It is not clear in court documents who will pay the settlement.

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