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Police stops dramatically down in Oakland - San Francisco Chronicle

Police stops dramatically down in Oakland - San Francisco Chronicle | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Francisco ChroniclePolice stops dramatically down in OaklandSan Francisco ChronicleOakland police officers are stopping roughly 75 percent fewer drivers and pedestrians this year than they did just three years ago, a steep drop in enforcement...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Officers involved in multiple shootings - bad cops or just doing a risky job?

Officers involved in multiple shootings - bad cops or just doing a risky job? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When police officers get involved in multiple shootings over their career, are they bad cops, or does it just happen? The answers aren't easy.
Rob Duke's insight:
In my mind, there are too many variables and too many data points to come up with "the" answer.  As in most things that involve social, political, and economic relationships, the answer is "it depends".

I will say that what I saw were two things: 1. stuff happens randomly, but some officers seem to be more "shit magnets" than others; and, 2. having been a shit magnet and observing other shit magnets, the commonality that I saw was extreme commitment to following up on the little things.  In other words, if you saw something move out of the corner of your eye; or a car that was somewhere when it shouldn't have been, the shit magnets always ALWAYS turned around and did another check.  999 times out of 1000 nothing happened, but that 1 other time, that was when you uncovered the felony in progress where the guy/guys want to run or fight.

So, no I don't think officers who have been in multiple gunfights are bad cops.  On the contrary, I think they're doing the best they can just like everyone else....
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 10:29 AM
I do believe that reason certain officers are involved in multiple shootings depends primarily on the type of officer they are and the job or task they are assigned to. I was told repeatedly that being a K-9 handler I was the most likely officer to be involved in a shootout statistically speaking. It makes sense when you are a patrol dog handler, you are actively using the dog to track suspects or conduct building searches to find the suspect. You really are the officer that is most likely to come in contact with the fleeing suspect. Because you are more likely to have contact with the suspect and you are always going on suspect apprehension calls, you would then be the most likely person to encounter a dangerous suspect. It makes sense to me yet I never was involved in a shootout as a K-9 handler. Even though I was most likely involved it does not guarantee I would be involved in a shootout. Other officers may have high performing tasks like SWAT or gang units and they tend to gravitate towards higher conflict areas or riskier calls for service.
The second factor that needs to be addressed is the type of officer you are. The more curious you are and the more proactive you are as a cop then the more likely you are to apprehend a suspect, possibly getting involved in a shootout. A cop who works the midnight shift will often encounter vehicle and foot traffic that may appear suspicious. Most businesses are closed at night so an occupied vehicle in the business’s parking lot after hours raises the question as to what the vehicle is doing at the business. Some cops will dismiss the vehicle as belonging to a cleaning crew and drive away. Other cops are more curious and even though they know it is probably a cleaning crew they will still investigate and verify by contact the vehicle. It seems simple enough that most people who are not police would say that contacting the vehicle to verify their purpose is what the cops should do. The issue is that cops have many different responsibilities that weigh on them. They may have five reports to finish and they still have to police in their assigned patrol area. Cops are hesitant to go looking for more trouble when it means that they may end up writing more reports when they’re already behind. If they see an obvious crime then they will jump on it, they just avoid looking for trouble otherwise. A good cop always investigates and looks to catch criminals in the act of the crime. These type of officers are again more likely to have contact with the suspect and therefore more likely to get involved in a shootout than other cops who avoid conflict.
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How Cultures Across the World Approach Leadership

How Cultures Across the World Approach Leadership | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
They vary in deference and decision making.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a great video topic about management styles.  Not specifically about Justice, but still appropriate...

Hope you find it useful.
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Social media allows law enforcement and community to work together

Social media allows law enforcement and community to work together | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Facebook pages and web sites can sometimes create problems for some individuals. However, for one law enforcement agency the technology movement has created a working relationship between the department and
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 11:05 AM
All police departments should have some presence on social media in my opinion. Web sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and the like are not going away. These web sites are how our society engages socially with topics that affect us the most or draw our attention. Having a social media presence is a must for any department. If you do not, then somebody else will fill the void and create a narrative for your department. I know personally that our department’s Facebook presence has been a huge success. We can get information out to the public in a timely manner, much faster than traditional media. We have also utilized the social interaction to help us solve crime by identifying unknown suspects through photos and videos that we have posted. We need this social media presence so that we can best serve our community by providing information and helping them with their questions and concerns. I love our department’s interactions on social media. It has done nothing but help us and develop a positive experience with the community.
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Del. Price's police graduation speech touches a nerve

Del. Price's police graduation speech touches a nerve | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Del. Marcia “Cia” Price's speech at academy's graduation elicited displeasure.
Rob Duke's insight:
I always ask what did the person gain for their speech?  Did they use the power of persuasion on behalf of the collective "we" or did they use it to bolster their own position in some way?

These can be difficult questions to answer and we may only be able to say that in the balance, the benefit is expected to come back to both...I suppose that's why we have checks and balances on power, including, in this case: the power of the press to report; and the power of free speech so there's some rebuttal.

To say: If they had a problem with my speech, then the problem goes much deeper is not appropriate.  In that case, I'd say that the power of persuasion is being abused.
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 11:33 AM
I do take issue when a person makes a statement on a strongly held belief that does not have empirical evidence to support it. I agree with a lot of things that Price said in her speech but then I disagree with others because I do not have enough information to make an informed opinion. I would prefer that people would wait to speak out until they have enough evidence to support their position. Let us try to stop making emotional speeches based on emotion. Let us be emotional about speeches that are based on fact. There is a difference between the two types of speeches. I do not know enough about the shooting where officers shot 41 times. Yet, I do know enough about other shootings and my personal experience to know how a person could be shot at 41 times. If you have four officers involved in the shooting then you can easily divide the shots into 10 shots for each officer. Now I have shot in a training scenario where I was very excited and stressed out. They asked me how many times I shot and I could have sworn I shot five times but it turned out I shot nine times. I also know that officers shoot to stop a threat and may not stop until the threat stops. Officers have shot a person who was still moving and they perceived them as a threat. The suspect was actually moving because they were being shot by another officer. You may scratch your head and be confused as to how this happens. The truth is that most officers are not ever involved in a shooting. It is a completely unknown experience to every person until they go through the experience. You truly do not know how you will react until you get into that life and death situation. This is the type of experience that people who give speeches lack. They do not have evidence to back up what they say and it perpetuates these false ideals and concepts that are not based on fact.
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More Body-Worn Cameras, Less Use-of-Force: Study Reveals Compelling Correlation - Phoenix Business Journal

More Body-Worn Cameras, Less Use-of-Force: Study Reveals Compelling Correlation - Phoenix Business Journal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LAS VEGAS, and SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Dec. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Use-of-force complaints fell dramatically at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) after the agency deployed Axon (Nasdaq: AAXN) body-worn cameras, a recent independent study revealed. The study, conducted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), and CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization, also found that the implementation of body cameras resulted in a decrease in police misconduct. The full study can be found here: https://www.cna.org/cna_files/pdf/IRM-2017-U-016112-Final.pdf.

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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 1:40 PM
This article title is misleading as it talks about the rate of citizen complaints, not the act in the use of force. I am happy to see more studies being done on the effectiveness of body worn cameras. There is just not enough empirical information that can give an unquestionable statement on the effectiveness of body cameras in law enforcement in regards to a change in the rate of the use of force. I would be happy if enough studies confirm this finding that there is a reduction in the use of force complaints. In my experience I think that body worn cameras will simply document the excellent job most officers do day in and day out. I do not think that it will truly change people’s behavior but it will provide documentation in as an objective manner as possible.
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USC program aims to help LAPD officers build trust, de-escalate encounters with homeless, mentally ill

USC program aims to help LAPD officers build trust, de-escalate encounters with homeless, mentally ill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Los Angeles Police Department has partnered with USC in a “groundbreaking” pilot project that aims to reduce violence on L.A. streets while building trust with the community.
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Ex-police officer acquitted in killing of man who begged 'do not shoot me'

Ex-police officer acquitted in killing of man who begged 'do not shoot me' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The jurors' decision to acquit Philip Mitchell Brailsford, 27, brought an end to one of the rare cases of an officer being prosecuted in a shooting death.
Rob Duke's insight:
It's clear to me in the few short seconds of the body cam why he shot the man.  See for yourself: the man mimics the movement that you'd make if you were attempting to draw a holstered gun...now believed to have been pulling up his pants.
Training issues: 1. at first there, with the guy's hands high in the air, he could have had the guy do a 360 degree turn.  Hands held high, the shirt would have lifted nearly off the wasteband so that you could see if he had a weapon hidden there.  Later when he adjusted his pants, no issue. 2. smg's are fine (sub-machine gun) for some duties, but taking a long gun into a hotel for a disturbance (not an active shooter) was not wise.  smg's have much more penetration than a standard hand gun and in any residential use space, you have lots of people crammed into a small space.  you don't want rounds travelling two rooms away and shooting an innocent.  also, long guns are just more awkward in tight spaces.  I can't tell what sling, if any, he has.  A good sling can allow the officer to drop the gun and still use his hands.  In which case, though, I'd have expected him to have dropped the smg and been using his handgun in this situation.  3. my last Monday morning quarterback: when you think a guy is dangerous, don't talk to him from an exposed position.  Take a position of cover...even in another doorway.  It gives you another second to make a decision and makes it more likely you survive a deadly encounter.
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Before the body-worn cameras start rolling: How open records laws impact police policy

Before the body-worn cameras start rolling: How open records laws impact police policy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A police department must understand its state's public records law, and any existing exemptions, before implementing body-worn cameras
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 2:17 AM
The wearing of body cameras by officers, as well as having dashcams active in their patrol vehicles, has certainly had an impact on police officers and the ways they carry themselves, especially when the recorded footage is accessible to the public. It is only natural, nowadays, for government entities to make very shortsighted, rash decisions that come with little to no thought of what kind of problems these decisions may bring about.
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Program helps police get private surveillance footage to solve crimes

Nearly 80 surveillance cameras belonging to private citizens and businesses in Ventura County have been instrumental in helping law enforcement solve crimes.

These cameras are in Ventura and Simi Valley where the cities’ police have started programs that let them know the specific areas where surveillance footage exists. 

On a voluntary basis, local businesses and residents can register their cameras with police with the expectation that they can be called upon to look at the footage when a nearby crime occurs. 

About two dozen of these cameras are registered in Ventura and 55 are registered in Simi Valley. Those interested in the program give police the number of cameras they have, where they are, which way they are facing and some contact information through an online form. 

The camera locations are then entered into the computer-aided dispatch system and will come up for officers on the computers in their patrol cars if a crime or vehicle crash is reported in a certain area. 
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 1:47 AM
This is such a genius system to implement! I'm kind of surprised that it's not a more widespread practice already, I know that the department here would benefit from public assistance like this. It definitely helps strengthen police-community relationships, as well as giving citizens a good sense of duty.
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Black Lives Matter PA Activist Asa Khalif Arrested During Protest Outside Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office

Black Lives Matter PA Activist Asa Khalif Arrested During Protest Outside Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Black Lives Matter Pennsylvania activist Asa Khalif was arrested Monday after he broke a window during a protest at the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office in Philadelphia.

Khalif, 47, and another protester showed up at the office on S. 12th Street unannounced Monday morning and demanded answers regarding Attorney General Josh Shapiro’s open investigation of the deadly police shooting of David Jones, Shapiro's spokesperson Joe Grace told NBC10.
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VIDEO : Former Trump advisor Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI

VIDEO : Donald Trump's ex-national security advisor Michael Flynn has been charged with making false statements to the FBI over Russian contacts
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's an example of the enhanced power that the Feds enjoy that local police do not.  So, in the lecture where the law professor made the argument that the exclusionary rule doesn't impact enforcement offering proof that it doesn't hamper the Feds, he's not being completely honest.
Local law enforcement have fewer tools and therefore fewer incentives exist for witnesses/suspects to be honest with them.

Note: I'm not arguing against the exclusionary rule, but this is an example of the cons offered in class to rebut the assertion that there are no ill-effects from adopting this policy.

I've argued before that we're seeing a Coase Theorem effect as we re-define "ownership" or property rights for certain investigative powers.  When we tell officers that they can't do something, that shifts power of the public and private space away from the people collectively and onto a subset of society that does not respect civil society.  As Coase predicts, when this happens, the market reacts and finds the most efficient outcome possible given this particular institutional arrangement.  Look around and see if there are examples of citizens investing more in security, surveillance, and arming themselves.  If so, what are the implications for civil society?  Maybe that's ok...especially if government wasn't very efficient providing public safety, but ask yourself if you really want the authority to use force being "owned" by private forces or is it better to be in the public sphere where we can openly debate its proper use?  The rich who hire their security are rarely questioned on how they operate; and the bad guys don't seem to care, but an officer who violates policy or law and risks losing his/her job seems to care a great deal.

That seems to me to be a significant difference and a good reason to cease transferring ownership of the public good to private forces.  Let me know what you think.
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Cop adopts homeless addict's newborn baby

Cop adopts homeless addict's newborn baby | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Minutes after meeting a pregnant, homeless addict, Officer Ryan Holets found himself offering to adopt her opioid-addicted baby. CNN's Ed Lavendera reports.
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Krista Scott's comment, December 4, 6:21 PM
This story of this Albuquerque officer is touching its not everyday you hear a story like this. When I watched the interview he mentioned that she was using at 8 months which is insane and she even admitting she was wrong. The downside of this story is that the mother is still on the streets and is still using and that she has pretty much given up on life. This is truly an eyeopening story and makes you really think about our homeless population.
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California Proposition 8 (1982) - Wikipedia

California Proposition 8 (1982) - Wikipedia

Proposition 8 (or The Victims' Bill of Rights) was a law enacted by California voters on 8 June 1982, by means of the initiative process. The law restricted the rights of convicts, and those suspected of crimes, and extended the rights of victims. To do this it amended both the Constitution of California and ordinary statutes.

The Victims' Bill of Rights declared its purpose as to ensure that:
The rights of victims pervade the criminal justice system, encompassing not only the right to restitution from the wrongdoers for financial losses suffered as a result of criminal acts, but also the more basic expectation that persons who commit felonious acts causing injury to innocent victims will be appropriately detained in custody, tried by the courts, and sufficiently punished so that the public safety is protected and encouraged as a goal of highest importance.[1]
Rob Duke's insight:
More back up....
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Pa. officer suspended after going to church while on duty

Pa. officer suspended after going to church while on duty | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Officer Mark Hovan said he believes the suspension violates his religious freedom
Rob Duke's insight:
If this case reaches the Supreme Ct., it will create a quandary for the court.  Under the current law (Lemon v. Kurtzman, 1971), the court considers several factors now known as the Lemon Test:

1. Does the statute or policy must have a secular legislative purpose. (Also known as the Purpose Prong)?
2. Does the principal or primary effect of the statute/policy advance or inhibit religion? (Also known as the Effect Prong).
3. Does the statute result in an "excessive government entanglement" with religion? (Also known as the Entanglement Prong). Usually defined as having an exchange of money or value. 
(wikipedia)

The chief will argue that he couldn't have cared less that the officer was attending church, it would have been the same if he was attending Rotary, or going to his kid's Little League game.  And, that's a safe bet.  That may be enough for the court to refuse to grant certiorari (writ stating that the S. Ct. will take a case).  Usually, the court starts at question 1 (above) and says if the purpose prong isn't violated, then you don't need to ask questions 2 & 3.

This is especially true if we flipped this and the case was about the ACLU suing because they heard the officer was allowed to attend church on duty.  Again the Chief would argue that church isn't the issue, since he/she, in this hypothetical change of facts, encourages officers to attend community events (church being one of many).

This is simply a one-off case, so the court may just let this lie and hope that no other cases arise.  But, they may decide that it is time to freshen up this Warren Court decision, since it hasn't been revisited since 1971.

They may also take up the case because of the way it reverses a community policing trend of encouraging officers to be directly involved in their community--even while on duty.

Remember, before the August Vollmer era, cops hit the streets at the beginning of shift and were out in their neighborhoods without radios or even patrol cars.  They occupied themselves with the business of the community...afterall, the word Police is derived from the Greek word for the people..."polis".

Let me know what you think and after you've had a chance to respond, I'll tell you where I land on this controversy.....
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 10:42 AM
I was not aware of the case law that Duke quoted. I do see this issue as first a chain of command issue and then secondly a religion issue. If an officer was previously ordered not to do something, and then that officer does that activity against orders, they will get into trouble. This is almost universally understood in law enforcement. We may get told to do things that we do not agree with; we do not have to like it; we just have to do it. We can refuse orders that are unlawfully, immoral, unethical, or against policy. The issue comes down to does the officer’s right to attend church extend to his work or duty hours? Does the chief saying he needs to take leave violate the officer’s right to attend church meetings? I personally feel that you can take your lunch break and attend a public function that is not directed by the department. As long as it socially acceptable there usually is no issue. If you, as an officer, demand to attend church for several hours every day then there is a problem. We have police applicants who refuse to work on Sunday. This is a problem because crime still happens during church hours on a Sunday. The police need people to responds to calls 24hours a day, seven days a week. If you cannot commit to that demand then law enforcement may not be the career field for you. I can think of several officers in my life who were very religious but still struck a balance between the needs of their police job and the needs of their church. I think there is more to this story and this officer is probably being more difficult than he needs to be or that he has a right to be.
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Local law enforcement agencies practice less-lethal measures

Local law enforcement agencies practice less-lethal measures | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Kittitas County Sheriff’s Deputy Chris Whitsett said annual training in less lethal enforcement methods is a vital learning experience.
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 10:53 AM
I think a statement from my photography instructor applies here, “what is the best camera? The one that you have with you.” Less lethal options are a wonderful tool, if you have them with you. The article did not talk about how the various less lethal options are deployed in this department. It does no good at all to the officer on a traffic stop if the TASER is back at the office sitting on a supervisor’s desk. Many agencies do a limited roll out of less lethal options due to lack of funding. Departments should do whatever they can to ensure that the officers in the field have the most tools available to them to do the job at hand. Even with all the less lethal options available, it still may not work and may end up in a lethal shooting. I like how the department encouraged citizens to ride-a-long with a police officer. It is apparent that the department is actively trying to educate the public which goes a long way to healthy relationship with the community they serve.
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The changing face of our police - how technology is transforming the way they fight crime

The changing face of our police - how technology is transforming the way they fight crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Read the latest Anglia stories, The changing face of our police - how technology is transforming the way they fight crime on ITV News, videos, stories and all the latest Anglia news
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 11:15 AM
It amazes me how slow law enforcement is reacting to modern internet technology. The amount of crime that has been committed online has just sky rocketed and yet there is a real concern that law enforcement is not adapting fast enough to engage this new crime zone. The issue is that people can commit crimes like stalking and harassment so easily online. There is no real physical act or hurdle that they have to overcome. A person can make a simple fake account and start harassing people online versus actively walking up to a person and saying the harassing comments to their face. It is just too easy for people commit these acts and law enforcement is slow to respond. If you have been harassed online you make a report to the local police. You’ll be assigned an officer to look into the alleged harassment but there is no guarantee that the officer is trained on how to even begin an online investigation. You are gambling with the hope you’ll get the best officer for the job but the reality is you’ll be assigned a traditional law enforcement officer who is unable to assist. In order to better serve our citizens we need to develop task forces or assign a division to do nothing else but address online crime. It is a real issue that can have a real impact on a person’s life. Unfortunately, I do not see an easy answer for law enforcement agencies to address this new problem when many are already understaffed and under budgeted.
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Home — Police 2 Peace

At its most fundamental level, it simply transforms the term POLICE OFFICER into the term PEACE OFFICER on existing squad cars in a municipality.  

Our shared mission is empathy above all.  Just like everyday life, more can be accomplished through collaboration with one another in the areas we all have in common.   Here at Police2Peace, we focus on the things that connect us rather than divide us.  We all want the same things:  happiness, peace, prosperity, good health. 

That's why Police2Peace exists:  to create better interactions between communities and law enforcement.  Our first initiative is to add a decal which says PEACE OFFICER to law enforcement squad cars which display the word POLICE on them. 
Rob Duke's insight:
My home department will be one of the first to join this program....
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 1:11 PM
Actions speak louder than words. This is running the risk of being “lipstick on a pig.” It will not really change anything at all unless there are real, measurable changes in how a specific department operates. What actions are they taking to ensure that the police department is acting in a manner consistent with best practices? It would not help at all if one department embraced the “peace” officer label and but had the highest rates of excessive or unjustified use of force. In the ‘90s there was a push to change SWAT team names to kindlier, gentler names. SWAT had developed too much of a negative appearance. Yet when we said we had a Tactical Police Team we would immediately have to say it was our SWAT team so people could understand. If your department is acting in a professional manner and educating the public then you will have the best relationship you can have with the community you serve. This is more important than simply changing a name. I embrace the name but I am more concerned with the actions to support the change in behavior
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Ex-cop Michael Slager sentenced to 20 years in prison for killing unarmed black man

Ex-cop Michael Slager sentenced to 20 years in prison for killing unarmed black man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A bystander's video showed police officer Michael Slager shooting and killing the fleeing, unarmed Walter Scott.
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Gregory Foster's comment, Today, 11:47 AM
I could not be more pleased with this incident. Slager blatantly tried to plant evidence on Scott. The video is obvious (to me) and is indefensible. This is the primary case for my argument that all law enforcement officers need to wear body cameras. There is no guarantee that the body camera will catch everything but there is enough of a likelihood that they will be caught doing things that they should not. Hopefully this will result in weeding out officers that should not be police officers. I feel Slager shot Scott out of frustration with the fact that he could not apprehend him when they fought and that he could not run him down when he fled. I’m just disgusted by Slager’s actions. We need this to happen when and only when there is evidence to support charges.
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Marvin Roberts, one of Fairbanks Four, files civil rights suit against city

Marvin Roberts, one of Fairbanks Four, files civil rights suit against city | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS—Marvin Roberts, one of the Fairbanks Four, is suing the city of Fairbanks and four Fairbanks Police Department officers over what he maintains was his wrongful imprisonment for the 1997
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VIDEO: LA County deputies fire non-lethal rounds at armed man

VIDEO: LA County deputies fire non-lethal rounds at armed man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A barricade involving an armed man in a liquor store came to a dramatic end when Los Angeles County deputies fired multiple non-lethal rounds at the defiant suspect Wednesday.
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 8, 1:28 AM
Police officers are given guns for a reason. The suspect continued to ignore police orders after being tased and walked into a liquor store, he left and they fired non-lethally on him, which he ignored and kept walking after they were seen tasing him again, and he still ignored them for a while and kept going. At which point do they say, "enough is enough," and break out the lethal force? By the time officers are done ecalating their requests, it may be too late and there may be casualties.
Masha Nuss's comment, December 8, 1:29 AM
Escalating* their force!
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LAPD launches paid training program for high school grads who want to be cops

LAPD launches paid training program for high school grads who want to be cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
More than two dozen high school graduates will be working part-time for the Los Angeles Police Department and getting paid as part of the inaugural class of a program that aims to recruit and train…
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Krista Scott's comment, December 4, 6:33 PM
This is pretty cool I kinda hope this is a starting point for other states to adopt a program like this. I think that the experience they will gain from this will be most beneficial for them. I think LAPD is getting their moneys worth by implementing such program.
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Justices to Ponder Need for Warrant for Cellphone Tower Data

Justices to Ponder Need for Warrant for Cellphone Tower Data | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Like almost everyone else in America, thieves tend to carry their cellphones with them to work.

When they use their phones on the job, police find it easier to do their jobs. They can get cellphon
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 10:38 PM
As I said before in previous comments, police being able to track citizens based on cell tower connection trails is akin to invasion of privacy. I think they should have warrants for doing this kind of thing, since it's a source of information the power over which could be easily abused, and my position on this is pretty solid; The fact that it significantly decreases crime rate is irrelevant in my opinion.
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"It’s been complete hell": how police used a traffic stop to take $91,800 from an innocent man

"It’s been complete hell": how police used a traffic stop to take $91,800 from an innocent man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Just hours after this story was published, a judge, with the backing of state legislators who read Vox’s reporting, ruled in favor of Phil Parhamovich — and he will get his $91,800 back.
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Watch: Policeman shoots fellow officer in struggle with suspect

Watch: Policeman shoots fellow officer in struggle with suspect | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The gaffe saw a US police officer shoot his colleague with a stun gun as they were trying to arrest a suspect.
Rob Duke's insight:
He thought his partner was sick, so he gave him a dose of "Edison Medicine"....

The jokes about Tasers will follow this officer/sergeant in a good-natured sort of way for the rest of their careers.
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San Francisco defends sanctuary status as backlash mounts

San Francisco defends sanctuary status as backlash mounts | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The attacks on San Francisco and other cities with similar immigration policies began moments after a jury acquitted
Rob Duke's insight:
California has been here before.  In 1982, and again in 1986, voters revolted against the liberal legislature and courts.  First, the voters approved Prop. 8 the "Victim's Bill of Rights" and then in 1986, voters recalled Rose Bird the Chief Justice of their Supreme Court.  Bird had voted to overturn 64 out of 64 death penalty cases and voters finally had had enough.  This coincided with a new era of Republican governors including George Deukmejian (1983 to 1991), Pete Wilson (1992-1999).
Seeing this decision and angst over Prop. 47 (crime reform), I wonder if a voter backlash isn't coming soon....
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