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177 inmates from Kern County could be released from prison under the new three strikes law

177 inmates from Kern County could be released from prison under the new three strikes law | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Visit TurnTo23.com for breaking news and headlines from Bakersfield, CA.
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Taylor Altenburg's comment, November 29, 2012 9:36 PM
I think this is a pretty good idea. Our prison system is over flowing and many of them are related to the three strike rule that has nonviolent offenders locked up with violent offenders and using tax money in an unnecessary way. I think its great to have the ability to petition for a different sentence and this will hopefully open up our prisons for more serious criminals who should be locked up. If someone is dumb enough to get caught and offender yes they should be punished but i think if a third offense happens to be a nonviolent one there are better measures than giving them a life sentence. I think this could be a really good turnout or a really bad one.
Sarah's comment, December 5, 2012 8:37 PM
Finally. Why are we wasting so much time and money locking up non-violent offenders for LIFE? When we put someone in jail for life, we are basically saying that that person is not rehabilitatable. We are saying that they can never change, never be better, never be productive members of society (or at least we don't want to give them the chance to). It seems SO crazy to me, that we sentence people to a 25 year to life sentence for nonviolent crimes. Let's keep the violent, sociopathic criminals locked up, and let's let the people who actually have a chance to turn their lives around to do just that. Let's take all the money we are saving releasing these inmates on programs that will ensure their success on the outside!!!!
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Chicago police Cmdr. Paul Bauer shot to death at Thompson Center in Loop - Chicago Tribune

Chicago police Cmdr. Paul Bauer shot to death at Thompson Center in Loop - Chicago Tribune | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Chicago police officer was fatally shot Tuesday afternoon in the Loop, authorities said.
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Ninth Circuit Reverses Order to FBI to Disclose Records

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday reversed a district court order to the FBI requiring that it surrender to the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California and other groups more than 47,794 pages of documents relating to surveillance of Muslims.

It held that an agency may hold back any document if it can “establish a rational nexus between the withheld document and its authorized law enforcement activities,” without pointing to a particular law it is seeking to enforce.

Circuit Judge Andrew D. Hurwitz wrote the opinion vacating a summary judgment granted in 2015 to the ACLU by District Judge Richard Seeborg of the Northern District of California.

The issue was whether Exemption 7 of the Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”)—which applies to “records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes”—justifies the FBI’s withholding of the documents. Seeborg held that the FBI had the burden of pointing to a particular law it is seeking to enforce in connection with any document that was not released, and failed to make that showing.
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Westerville Ohio police shooting: Two officers killed

Westerville Ohio police shooting: Two officers killed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two police officers died after being shot Saturday in Westerville, Ohio, a northern suburb of Columbus, authorities said.
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Chicago Cop Throws Steaming Hot Coffee at Biker

Chicago Cop Throws Steaming Hot Coffee at Biker | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If you follow along down in the video below, you’ll be able to watch these individuals making their way through town as the officer decides to take his coffee and chuck it at one of the riders. From what the video tells us, the ride who it struck does say that his visor was up and the coffee was steaming hot. The comments on this one are flaring back and forth between people thinking that the rider had all of that and more coming his way with the way he was acting and others don’t think that this is the way that you would conduct yourself as an officer. After seeing the video below, be sure to tell us which side of the issue you side with.
Rob Duke's insight:
Cup makes a sound that is consistent with being an empty cup and not full of scalding coffee as the biker claims.
He also never makes any statements to that effect at the time and can be heard gleefully telling the cop: "I got you on camera, bro."
Sounds like a written reprimand for the officer to me.
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Measuring racial bias in police forces

Measuring racial bias in police forces | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it


IN HIS 14 years policing the streets of Montgomery County, Maryland, Sergeant Robert Sheehan has witnessed deadly shootings and stopped big-money cannabis deals. But on a sunny afternoon it is the windows of a passing car that raise his suspicion. Maryland law dictates that car windows should be no more than 65% opaque. He stops the black Chevrolet, whose driver is female and black, and by using a special meter he proves that the car breaks that law.

Debate on racial bias in policing tends to be dominated by the shootings of unarmed black men by police officers. Though terrible, such shootings are not common enough to allow the crunchers of big data sets to get to work. Routine traffic stops, on the other hand, occur about 50,000 times a day across America. They are the most common form of contact with the police: one in eight drivers was stopped in 2011.

Until recently these data have mostly been kept under lock and key. But a team of academics from Stanford University’s Open Policing project has spent two years amassing a trove of 130m traffic stops from 31 state police agencies. Their data, released this week, find that between 2011 and 2015 black drivers were stopped by the police twice as often as white drivers, suggesting that there is indeed something to the idea that “driving while black” is an offence.

Higher rates of stopping and searching are not sufficient to demonstrate that racial bias exists, though. The pool of drivers that the police might stop could be unrepresentative in all sorts of ways. Some ethnic groups might drive more than others, or perhaps there is some mysterious racial difference in driving style that leads to more police stops. To answer the question properly the late Gary Becker, a Nobel-prizewinning economist, devised a simple measure for racial bias in 1957. Becker argued that tests for racial discrimination should focus on the outcome alone: in this case whether police searches of vehicles yield contraband, such as drugs or illegal weapons. If black motorists were stopped more often, even though they were actually less likely to have something illegal in the glove compartment, that would provide solid proof of racial bias.

The Stanford data show that searches of white drivers yield contraband 32% of the time. By contrast, when the driver was black or Hispanic, the contraband hit rate was 26%. That suggests a significant amount of bias. Delve deeper, though, and the difference is caused by a small number of bad counties. Among the 496 counties for which the Stanford researchers have complete data, just 30 had a gap of more than 25 percentage points separating whites from minorities. Remove a hundred of the worst counties, and racial bias narrows from six to three percentage points. That tallies with other research on police bias. A recent working paper from graduate students at Princeton found that bias in leniency among Florida’s police officers could be explained by decisions made by one fifth of all officers.

A different way to perform Becker’s test is to look at whether drivers receive the same treatment from police when they commit the same motoring offence. An analysis by The Economist of 1m traffic stops in Montgomery County in Maryland since 2012 suggests that Hispanics are significantly more likely to receive tickets than whites or African-Americans. When stopped for running a traffic light, white and black females got a ticket 30% of the time. Hispanic men received tickets 40% of the time for the same offence. This finding tallies with data from North Carolina, where police stops recorded since 2000 show persistent bias against Hispanics.

Back in Maryland, Sergeant Sheehan smells cannabis in the blacked-out Chevrolet. A search yields a jar of it in the glove compartment. He gives a warning to the driver, then lets her young son honk the horn of his patrol car.

Rob Duke's insight:
Remove the 100 worst counties and the numbers are fairly equal.  What do we do with the worst counties?
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VIDEO: Nutty Pastor Claims 'Sanctuary,' Interferes With Felony Arrest - Blue Lives Matter

VIDEO: Nutty Pastor Claims 'Sanctuary,' Interferes With Felony Arrest - Blue Lives Matter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The pastor at Old Stone Church claimed non-existent sanctuary laws prohibited arrests in her church.
Rob Duke's insight:
I'll bet this congregation has some stories to tell about this pastor.
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60 citizen planners will enter a very special Philly club tonight

60 citizen planners will enter a very special Philly club tonight | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Wish you could show up to your neighborhood civic association meeting and get people to listen to you the way they do to that know-it-all from down the block? Well, there may not be an app for that, but there is the Philadelphia Citizens Planning Institute, run by Philadelphia City Planning Commission. The bi-annual course aims to educate residents on how to effectively make their voice heard in the zoning and development processes shaping their communities, and on Tuesday evening the latest class will graduate. Since 2010, 450 Philadelphans—lifelong residents and new transplants alike—representing 158 neighborhoods have gone through CPI. Seven years in, the program hit a few firsts in 2017, including graduating its first high schooler. And what happens after graduation? One graduate, Kyle Shenandoah, helped form a civic group in his Grays Ferry neighborhood. If you want in on this very Philly club, CPI accepts applications twice a year for their spring and fall cohorts. The program costs  $100 to125 and the city offers a $50 scholarship to all who request it.
Rob Duke's insight:
Cops can learn a lot about citizen outreach and citizen involvement from their urban planners....


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LA Man Charged With Murder Of Transgender Woman

LA Man Charged With Murder Of Transgender Woman | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles man accused of fatally stabbing a 33-year-old trangender woman he met online and then setting her Pico-Union apartment on fire was charged today with murder, attempted robbery and arson charges that could result in th
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Report of Attempted Suicide Justified Warrantless Entry

When police, arriving in response to a call that a man was in a house with firearms and had announced an intent to kill himself, did not breach the Fourth Amendment when they made a cursory sweep of the house to make certain no one was injured and there were no firearms out in the open, the Court of Appeal for this district held yesterday.

The fact that the man had come out of the house and was presently unarmed, the court said, did not preclude entering the residence on a “community caretaking” theory.

Justice Kenneth Yegan wrote for the majority in affirming the conviction of the man, Willie Ovieda, based on what officers spotted: equipment for manufacturing concentrated cannabis and an unlawful assault weapon. Justice Steven Z. Perren dissented.

 “Over 50 years ago, wise and prescient Chief Justice Phil Gibson planted the judicial seed for what we now call the ‘community caretaking’ exception to the Fourth Amendment,” Yegan said. “ We apply it here.”
Rob Duke's insight:
It's pretty standard to "clear" a house when a weapon or threats call comes in.  I think the court ruled correctly.
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A More Reasonable Expectation - Calibre Press

A More Reasonable Expectation - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“I would suggest a whole more radical standard than [the Graham Standard]. … I would suggest that they have to be, the cops have to be right in fact, which is something we usually do not apply to the law. … So if you shoot me because you think I have a gun I had best have a gun, and if I don’t have a gun your ass is going to jail. Because you were wrong. I don’t care if you really thought so. I don’t care if I was telling you I had a gun! If you are not right in fact then you have to go to jail. I think that would be a standard that would allow us to prosecute these police officers. … And I would say, ‘Fuck you, police officer!’ I’m sick of you. Screw you …”

Mr. Mystal, according to an online biography, “quit the legal profession to pursue a career as an online provocateur.” That explains that.
Rob Duke's insight:
The problem with transferring the monopoly for the use of force away from the police is that there's NO guarantee that private forces will use force properly.  We don't have enough surveillance to keep the thugs, the mob, the cartels, the gangs, etc. from abusing the weak.
We have enough trouble doing that with the police and that's what he's complaining about.  It's never going to be perfect, but when a cop messes up, we relieve them of duty....and, guess what: they go away and we largely never hear from them again.  Try that with any other power broker.  They don't give up their use of force or their power.  They resist.
I'd much rather have that power held in a public position that is subject to oversight, however flawed.
Then, we should concentrate on ways to make that oversight better.
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Nationwide, police shot and killed nearly 1,000 people in 2017

Nationwide, police shot and killed nearly 1,000 people in 2017 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Experts said they are uncertain why the annual total shows little fluctuation — the number for 2017 is almost identical to the 995 killed by police in 2015.
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Police Release Video Of Deadly Shooting After Officers Receive Death Threats - Law Officer

Police Release Video Of Deadly Shooting After Officers Receive Death Threats - Law Officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After social media exploded in North Little Rock (AR) over the weekend following an officer involved shooting, Chief Mike Davis released video of the incident. 
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Police Officers Union Ad Rips SFPD Over Leaving Terrorism Task Force

Police Officers Union Ad Rips SFPD Over Leaving Terrorism Task Force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Francisco’s police officer union is running radio ads blasting the police department and city for pulling out of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), claiming the SFPD was not involved in the recent FBI investigation into the alleged Pier 39 terror plot.

San Francisco was the the only big city police department to drop out of the JTTF last February amid concerns the Trump administration would increase surveillance of Muslim communities like the New York City police did after Sept. 11, 2001.
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The missing link in policing | Police Foundation

The missing link in policing | Police Foundation | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Leading from the front, the New York Police Department has begun exploring mechanisms to incorporate sentiment analysis — data about public perceptions —  as a component of its flagship performance management system.

They are on to something important. The NYPD knows that it matters how members of the public feel about police services.

Police are dependent upon the support and cooperation of the public to be effective, and communities are likewise dependent upon the police to help create safe communities.

If you ask most police officers, they will tell you their role is simply to respond to police calls for service, fight crime, and arrest violators of the law as the intake process for the criminal justice system.

In this worldview, success is typically defined by numbers of arrests, citations, special initiatives. If crime rates are going down, and we are making a lot of contacts, citations, and arrests, we must be doing a great job.

However, ask most members of the public, and they will paint a very different picture.

They will invariably tell you they want to feel safe in their neighborhoods; they want police to be responsive to concerns they have about crime and other issues that negatively impact their quality of life. They want prompt and timely police services when they have been impacted by crime, and they want police to help them avoid becoming victims in the future. Anytime they come in contact with police, they want to be treated with dignity and respect.  
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Buffalo Police disbanding controversial Strike Force - WKBW.com Buffalo, NY

Buffalo Police disbanding controversial Strike Force - WKBW.com Buffalo, NY | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Buffalo Police Department is disbanding its specialized Strike Force unit, effective March 12. The officers will be reassigned to the department's traffic enforcement division.

The Strike Force was established to tackle issues in high crime areas.

It has been under public criticism from activists who say its tactics, including road blocks, unfairly target minority neighborhoods.
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Getting on Brady list 'like a scarlet letter' for Boulder County law enforcement officers

Getting on Brady list 'like a scarlet letter' for Boulder County law enforcement officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Boulder County district attorney's Brady list is a somewhat-secret roster that includes at least 13 current and former officers who have findings of untruthfulness or misconduct on their records that could weaken their credibility if called upon to testify as a witness in a jury trial.
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BODYCAM: Man Sues Police for Being 'Wrongfully Tased' - Calibre Press

BODYCAM: Man Sues Police for Being 'Wrongfully Tased' - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“When I turn around boom, before I had a chance to get down on my knees,” Fernando Coronado, 47 years-old, said during a press conference with his attorney Robert Sykes.

During the press conference, Sykes showed the body cam video from one of the officers when the incident happened back on August 3, 2016 at an apartment complex in West Valley City located near 5700 W. and 2600 S.

The video shows a swarm of officers shouting at Coronado to come out of his apartment. When he steps out he’s naked from the waist up and he continues to walk back and forth. He then makes his way towards two officers and that when they shoot him with their tasers.

Coronado, who admits he was drunk, claims he was not lunging towards the officers but was in the process of going down to his knees when he was hit with the electric shock.
Rob Duke's insight:
You decide.  Was he trying to comply?
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Old Stone Church Pastor Resigns After Confronting Cops On Video

Old Stone Church Pastor Resigns After Confronting Cops On Video | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
EAST HAVEN, CT — Just a few days after the Old Stone Church Pastor confronted East Haven Police officers that they searched inside her church for an accused violent fugitive, church officials announced that the Pastor, Rev. Care Goodstal Spinks is no longer with the church.

In a lengthy post on social media, the Old Stone Church (aka First Congregational Church of East Haven Inc.) released the following statement.

"We are deeply saddened by the events that unfolded at the Old Stone Church on Tuesday January 23. The behavior and language on video by the Intentional Interim Pastor, do not necessarily express the opinions of the wider congregation. We have accepted a letter of resignation from the interim pastor -effective immediately."
Rob Duke's insight:
Some more of this story....
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I’m a black man from Chicago who moved to Alabama, and here’s what I found - Yellowhammer News

I’m a black man from Chicago who moved to Alabama, and here’s what I found - Yellowhammer News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
  (Opinion) When I began attending Birmingham School of Law in early 2013, my wife was pregnant with our youngest son, Jaxson, and she utterly refused to move to Alabama. Let’s[...]
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Video shows LAPD cop pull student off train, arrest her for having foot on seat

Video shows LAPD cop pull student off train, arrest her for having foot on seat | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The incident was captured in a cellphone video that was shared on Facebook, earning over 6 million views. Brock Bryan, who recorded the 10 1/2-minute video, can be heard objecting to the teen's treatment by the officer, alongside other witnesses.

One of those witnesses was also arrested after allegedly spitting at an officer.


Bethany Renee Nava is seen being pulled off a Metro train on Jan. 22, 2018. (Credit: Brock Bryan)

Bethany Renee Nava of North Hollywood was riding the train when police say she was being loud and boisterous, prompting her to be removed and arrested, Los Angeles Police Department Officer Mike Lopez said.

In the video, Nava and other witnesses repeatedly say that the girl had only had her foot on a seat in the train when the officer confronted her. Bryan said the teen was on a Red Line train when the arrest took place at the Westlake/MacArthur Park station about 3 p.m. Monday.

In the video, the officer – who wears a sergeant's stripes on his uniform sleeve – motions to Nava to get out of her seat. He says, "I already told you what to do and you didn't. You disobeyed me. You're getting off the train."

The sergeant takes Nava by the arm and begins to pull her out of the seat.

"I paid to be on this train. Stop," Nava can be heard saying, using an expletive at the sergeant.

She grabs onto a pole and tries to remain inside the train, pulling back toward her seat so she can get her belongings. But the sergeant pulls her off the train and pushes her up against a wall on the platform, putting her hands behind her back.

As Nava looks down, gasping and appearing terrified, the sergeant calls for backup on his radio. Bryan, who follows the pair onto the platform, can be heard asking the sergeant not to arrest Nava.

"Over her foot on the train? That's so ridiculous. That's really abuse of power, officer," Bryan says. "She wasn't blocking anybody else from sitting down."

The sergeant releases Nava and she continues to argue with him. At one point, after she gives the officer her name, a bystander tells her not to give her name. Then the sergeant turns to that bystander and says, "You're next, buddy. You don't get to tell me what to do."

A second woman, later identified by LAPD as 22-year-old Selina Lechuga, can be heard shouting expletives at the sergeant as a small group gathers.

"You're going to take her to jail for putting her foot on the bus? Are you f---ing kidding me? You really have nothing to do," Lechuga says.

Nava, who can also be heard cursing, questions why she was pulled off the train for putting her foot on the seat; the sergeant explains it is one of the rules of the train.

A few minutes later, another train arrives and several more officers get off. The sergeant directs one of the officers to take Nava into custody, and that officer handcuffs her. Then two other officers cuff Lechuga's hands behind her back as she protests.

"This is racism," Lechuga says. "This is what we are: 2018, motherf---ers like this want to just try to act like they can do whatever they want. F--- you guys."

Lechuga then appears to spit at one of the officers – possibly the original sergeant – as she is being taken away.

More than a half-dozen officers responded to the platform, the video shows.

Nava was arrested on suspicion of being loud and boisterous on a train, Lopez said. She was released but is due in court Feb. 15.

Lechuga was arrested on suspicion of battery on a police officer for spitting and her bail was set at $20,000, Lopez said.
Rob Duke's insight:
How do you keep a subway nice? Enforce zero-tolerance for the low level rule violations that are easy to spot and witness.  It ends up the people, that graffiti, spit in public, are rude and put feet up or lay across multiple seats--these are the same people who commit more serious offenses.  Furthermore, they either behave or stay away when you enforce zero-tolerance.

It worked for Bill Bratton in the subways of Boston and New York, and it worked overall in New York when Bratton was promoted to Chief.  There was a time when NYC was Gotham and stop-n-frisk/zero-tolerance combined with CompStat is what changed things there.

However, having said all that, the way CompStat and zero-tolerance was implemented, particularly stop-n-frisk, resulted in some targeting of the poor and people of color.  CompStat 2.0 seeks to address that deficiency, but we've already lost the public relations battle, so it may take more to regain legitimacy for zero-tolerance enforcement.
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FBI Sting Operation Nets Arrest of L.A. County Sheriff’s Deputy Accused of Selling Drugs, Offering Protection to Dealers

FBI Sting Operation Nets Arrest of L.A. County Sheriff’s Deputy Accused of Selling Drugs, Offering Protection to Dealers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputy and three alleged accomplices stand accused of running a vast drug trafficking conspiracy in which they would provide security services to narcotics dealers in exchange for cash, according to a criminal complaint unsealed Tuesday.
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Can an increase in stop-and-search cut knife crime?

Can an increase in stop-and-search cut knife crime? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

IN A school classroom in north-east London, Ken Hinds preaches calmness and confidence. Mr Hinds, who runs the Haringey Independent Stop & Search Monitoring Group, is telling a handful of teenagers with behavioural problems how to respond if a police officer stops them in order to perform a mandatory search. The advice is relevant. When the class is asked who has been stopped, everyone—including the teacher—raises their hand. Their experiences vary: some say they remained unflustered, whereas for others it was a heart-pounding ordeal.

Such encounters have become less common. In 2011 the police conducted 1.2m stop-and-searches in England and Wales. Last year that figure was around 300,000 (see chart). The steep decrease was prompted by Theresa May, then the home secretary, in a rare flash of liberalism. She ordered police forces to cut back on searches because they stoked resentment among ethnic minorities, who are more likely than whites to be stopped.

In London that downward trend is about to reverse. On January 10th Sadiq Khan, the mayor, broke a campaign promise by announcing an increase in the use of stop-and-search, to counter a recent surge in violence. Average monthly knife-crime incidents rose from 791 in 2014 to 1,155 in the first half of 2017. Acid attacks increased from 166 in 2014 to 455 in 2016, the latest year available. Mr Khan blames the decline in stop-and-search for the rise.

Some welcome the news. Janette Collins, head of the Crib, a youth group in Hackney, says that protecting youngsters should be the priority. Teenagers in her area avoid rough neighbourhoods for fear of being stabbed. Patrick Green of the Ben Kinsella Trust, an anti-knife-crime charity set up in memory of a murdered teenager, is also pleased with the mayor’s decision, but says that other policies, like knife-crime education, are needed.

Yet others worry that it will sour police relations with minorities. Pupils in the north-east London school claim they are stopped just for being black and wearing their hoods up. David Lammy, the Labour MP for Tottenham, has criticised the revival of a “vexed” tactic.

Even though fewer searches take place, only 16% of young ethnic-minority men believe the tactic is being used less often, according to polls by YouGov. That may be because the drop in searches of minorities has been less steep than it has for whites. A black person is now eight times more likely to be stopped than a white person, up from four times more likely in 2013.

Officers have tried to curb the aggravation the tactic causes, says Adrian Hanstock, head of the police unit in charge of stop-and-search. He argues that searches help to keep weapons off the streets, but admits that in the past they were sometimes used in “fishing expeditions” or to disperse gangs. Today, in training officers discuss the social consequences of stop-and-search and how to control unconscious biases. New technology, like body-cameras, improve accountability too.

Will the tactic reduce crime? Only 17% of searches lead to an arrest, half of them for drug offences. A recent study by the Home Office examined the impact of a stop-and-search drive in 2008, also aimed at curbing knife crime. The authors found no effect. Similar research by the College of Policing found that a doubling of stop-and-search was associated with only a 0.1% fall in violent crime. Even if the latest drive is more effective, says Mr Hinds, it will come at a cost to community relations.

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Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant

Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mayor: US marshal shot, killed while serving warrant
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IPRA report advises firing of 2 CPD officers involved in 2016 shooting

IPRA report advises firing of 2 CPD officers involved in 2016 shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A now-defunct Chicago police oversight agency says two officers who fired shots at a moving vehicle during a chase in 2016 that ended in the death of a black teen should lose their jobs.
Rob Duke's insight:
Yeah, pretty predictable.....not that these guys can't be cops again, but this department has to fire them.
Maybe they can rehab as volunteers somewhere for a couple years and then come back working in a more rural setting.
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Did ‘Repressed Memory’ Falsely Convict Jerry Sandusky?

Did ‘Repressed Memory’ Falsely Convict Jerry Sandusky? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Author Mark Pendergrast claims the former Penn State defensive football coach was a victim of “media frenzy” and a distorted use of repressed memory which led to his conviction for child sex abuse. In a conversation with TCR about his new book, he explains why he believes Sandusky should get a new trial.
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