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Law Enforcement Veteran Weighs In On Police Violence - CBS Pittsburgh

Law Enforcement Veteran Weighs In On Police Violence - CBS Pittsburgh | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The public and fellow officers have called the patrolmen involved in the recent shooting...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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More Body-Worn Cameras, Less Use-of-Force: Study Reveals Compelling Correlation - Phoenix Business Journal

More Body-Worn Cameras, Less Use-of-Force: Study Reveals Compelling Correlation - Phoenix Business Journal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LAS VEGAS, and SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Dec. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Use-of-force complaints fell dramatically at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) after the agency deployed Axon (Nasdaq: AAXN) body-worn cameras, a recent independent study revealed. The study, conducted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), and CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization, also found that the implementation of body cameras resulted in a decrease in police misconduct. The full study can be found here: https://www.cna.org/cna_files/pdf/IRM-2017-U-016112-Final.pdf.

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USC program aims to help LAPD officers build trust, de-escalate encounters with homeless, mentally ill

USC program aims to help LAPD officers build trust, de-escalate encounters with homeless, mentally ill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Los Angeles Police Department has partnered with USC in a “groundbreaking” pilot project that aims to reduce violence on L.A. streets while building trust with the community.
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Ex-police officer acquitted in killing of man who begged 'do not shoot me'

Ex-police officer acquitted in killing of man who begged 'do not shoot me' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The jurors' decision to acquit Philip Mitchell Brailsford, 27, brought an end to one of the rare cases of an officer being prosecuted in a shooting death.
Rob Duke's insight:
It's clear to me in the few short seconds of the body cam why he shot the man.  See for yourself: the man mimics the movement that you'd make if you were attempting to draw a holstered gun...now believed to have been pulling up his pants.
Training issues: 1. at first there, with the guy's hands high in the air, he could have had the guy do a 360 degree turn.  Hands held high, the shirt would have lifted nearly off the wasteband so that you could see if he had a weapon hidden there.  Later when he adjusted his pants, no issue. 2. smg's are fine (sub-machine gun) for some duties, but taking a long gun into a hotel for a disturbance (not an active shooter) was not wise.  smg's have much more penetration than a standard hand gun and in any residential use space, you have lots of people crammed into a small space.  you don't want rounds travelling two rooms away and shooting an innocent.  also, long guns are just more awkward in tight spaces.  I can't tell what sling, if any, he has.  A good sling can allow the officer to drop the gun and still use his hands.  In which case, though, I'd have expected him to have dropped the smg and been using his handgun in this situation.  3. my last Monday morning quarterback: when you think a guy is dangerous, don't talk to him from an exposed position.  Take a position of cover...even in another doorway.  It gives you another second to make a decision and makes it more likely you survive a deadly encounter.
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Before the body-worn cameras start rolling: How open records laws impact police policy

Before the body-worn cameras start rolling: How open records laws impact police policy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A police department must understand its state's public records law, and any existing exemptions, before implementing body-worn cameras
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 2:17 AM
The wearing of body cameras by officers, as well as having dashcams active in their patrol vehicles, has certainly had an impact on police officers and the ways they carry themselves, especially when the recorded footage is accessible to the public. It is only natural, nowadays, for government entities to make very shortsighted, rash decisions that come with little to no thought of what kind of problems these decisions may bring about.
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Program helps police get private surveillance footage to solve crimes

Nearly 80 surveillance cameras belonging to private citizens and businesses in Ventura County have been instrumental in helping law enforcement solve crimes.

These cameras are in Ventura and Simi Valley where the cities’ police have started programs that let them know the specific areas where surveillance footage exists. 

On a voluntary basis, local businesses and residents can register their cameras with police with the expectation that they can be called upon to look at the footage when a nearby crime occurs. 

About two dozen of these cameras are registered in Ventura and 55 are registered in Simi Valley. Those interested in the program give police the number of cameras they have, where they are, which way they are facing and some contact information through an online form. 

The camera locations are then entered into the computer-aided dispatch system and will come up for officers on the computers in their patrol cars if a crime or vehicle crash is reported in a certain area. 
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 1:47 AM
This is such a genius system to implement! I'm kind of surprised that it's not a more widespread practice already, I know that the department here would benefit from public assistance like this. It definitely helps strengthen police-community relationships, as well as giving citizens a good sense of duty.
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Black Lives Matter PA Activist Asa Khalif Arrested During Protest Outside Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office

Black Lives Matter PA Activist Asa Khalif Arrested During Protest Outside Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Black Lives Matter Pennsylvania activist Asa Khalif was arrested Monday after he broke a window during a protest at the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office in Philadelphia.

Khalif, 47, and another protester showed up at the office on S. 12th Street unannounced Monday morning and demanded answers regarding Attorney General Josh Shapiro’s open investigation of the deadly police shooting of David Jones, Shapiro's spokesperson Joe Grace told NBC10.
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VIDEO : Former Trump advisor Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI

VIDEO : Donald Trump's ex-national security advisor Michael Flynn has been charged with making false statements to the FBI over Russian contacts
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's an example of the enhanced power that the Feds enjoy that local police do not.  So, in the lecture where the law professor made the argument that the exclusionary rule doesn't impact enforcement offering proof that it doesn't hamper the Feds, he's not being completely honest.
Local law enforcement have fewer tools and therefore fewer incentives exist for witnesses/suspects to be honest with them.

Note: I'm not arguing against the exclusionary rule, but this is an example of the cons offered in class to rebut the assertion that there are no ill-effects from adopting this policy.

I've argued before that we're seeing a Coase Theorem effect as we re-define "ownership" or property rights for certain investigative powers.  When we tell officers that they can't do something, that shifts power of the public and private space away from the people collectively and onto a subset of society that does not respect civil society.  As Coase predicts, when this happens, the market reacts and finds the most efficient outcome possible given this particular institutional arrangement.  Look around and see if there are examples of citizens investing more in security, surveillance, and arming themselves.  If so, what are the implications for civil society?  Maybe that's ok...especially if government wasn't very efficient providing public safety, but ask yourself if you really want the authority to use force being "owned" by private forces or is it better to be in the public sphere where we can openly debate its proper use?  The rich who hire their security are rarely questioned on how they operate; and the bad guys don't seem to care, but an officer who violates policy or law and risks losing his/her job seems to care a great deal.

That seems to me to be a significant difference and a good reason to cease transferring ownership of the public good to private forces.  Let me know what you think.
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Cop adopts homeless addict's newborn baby

Cop adopts homeless addict's newborn baby | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Minutes after meeting a pregnant, homeless addict, Officer Ryan Holets found himself offering to adopt her opioid-addicted baby. CNN's Ed Lavendera reports.
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Krista Scott's comment, December 4, 6:21 PM
This story of this Albuquerque officer is touching its not everyday you hear a story like this. When I watched the interview he mentioned that she was using at 8 months which is insane and she even admitting she was wrong. The downside of this story is that the mother is still on the streets and is still using and that she has pretty much given up on life. This is truly an eyeopening story and makes you really think about our homeless population.
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California Proposition 8 (1982) - Wikipedia

California Proposition 8 (1982) - Wikipedia

Proposition 8 (or The Victims' Bill of Rights) was a law enacted by California voters on 8 June 1982, by means of the initiative process. The law restricted the rights of convicts, and those suspected of crimes, and extended the rights of victims. To do this it amended both the Constitution of California and ordinary statutes.

The Victims' Bill of Rights declared its purpose as to ensure that:
The rights of victims pervade the criminal justice system, encompassing not only the right to restitution from the wrongdoers for financial losses suffered as a result of criminal acts, but also the more basic expectation that persons who commit felonious acts causing injury to innocent victims will be appropriately detained in custody, tried by the courts, and sufficiently punished so that the public safety is protected and encouraged as a goal of highest importance.[1]
Rob Duke's insight:
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New Zealand’s Police Recruitment Video Is the Action Comedy You’ve Been Waiting For

New Zealand’s Police Recruitment Video Is the Action Comedy You’ve Been Waiting For | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The country of New Zealand wants to hire new police officers, and to attract new recruits they’ve created a video that’s essentially a three-minute action comedy.There’s a lot of running, some weird dancing, one-liners, an intense soundtrack and, of course, a collection of outtakes during the credits.We’d totally see a feature-length version of this.
Rob Duke's insight:
Compare to the new Star Wars ads for Dallas-Ft. Worth P.D. which do you prefer?

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Arkansas Sheriff Gets Voice Back Over 1 Year Later

That was the length of time that Sharp County Sheriff Mark Counts found himself unable to speak no louder than a raspy whisper.

Thankfully, Counts is once again able to do the simplest things, like talk on a telephone, address the quorum court and even sing along with the radio, if he so chooses.

Counts' long road began on Oct. 7, 2016, when he was part of a group consisting of Sharp County Sheriff's Department deputies, the Drug Task Force and the Cherokee Village Police Department that searched the residence of Donna Murphy and Thomas Yarbrough, both 60.


Counts said that he and other officers had received word that drugs and firearms could be involved in what started out as a probation visit.

The Batesville Guard reports that during the search, Counts found a trapdoor in the floor, under which a metal box was hidden. The box contained chemicals for making meth, like drain cleaner and ether. The chemicals were strong enough that the box itself was corroding, and when the box was opened, the chemicals' fumes hit Counts directly in the face.
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Is the Government Waging an Out-of-Sight Fight With Apple Over Encryption?

Is the Government Waging an Out-of-Sight Fight With Apple Over Encryption? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Justice Department and Apple have been locked in a bitter fight for years over the company’s encryption system, which allows consumers to prevent anyone —including law enforcement—from opening their devices without permission. That’s why a security story this week should be getting more attention than it has.

Titled “Yup: The Government Is Secretly Hiding Its Crypto Battles In The Secret FISA Court,” the story appeared on the well-regarded security blog EmptyWheel, and suggests the Justice Department is using a legal backdoor to force open software backdoors at companies like Apple.

The details are complex and require some familiarity with the FISC, a closed court that oversees top secret intelligence operations, and with Section 702, an amendment to the Patriot Act that permits certain forms of warrantless surveillance. But the gist of the story is this: The Justice Department may be relying on an annual approval process at the FISC to compel “technical assistance” from Apple and others, and this assistance may include the breaking of encryption.
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DS's curator insight, November 22, 11:17 PM

Section 702 of the Patriot Act permits warrantless investigations of private citizens suspected of terrorist acts. The reasonable suspicion requirement to investigate someone has been replaced by the term significant purpose. Police are now using "technical assistance" to break encryption and view private citizens info. The Secret FISA Court is where "hearings" are being held. WTF.

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New Zealand police read 'mean tweets'

New Zealand police read 'mean tweets' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Watch New Zealand police read 'mean tweets' and other Police Humor videos on PoliceOne
Rob Duke's insight:
This is democracy: say mean things about your cops and all they do is chuckle....
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Riley Westfall's comment, November 17, 9:26 PM
Riley Westfall's insight: The people of New Zealand need to work on their grammar and insults because a lot of them didn't make much sense.
Adam Osborne's comment, November 18, 6:51 PM
i was confused on most of the insults and didn't really know what they were saying.
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Ex-cop Michael Slager sentenced to 20 years in prison for killing unarmed black man

Ex-cop Michael Slager sentenced to 20 years in prison for killing unarmed black man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A bystander's video showed police officer Michael Slager shooting and killing the fleeing, unarmed Walter Scott.
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Marvin Roberts, one of Fairbanks Four, files civil rights suit against city

Marvin Roberts, one of Fairbanks Four, files civil rights suit against city | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS—Marvin Roberts, one of the Fairbanks Four, is suing the city of Fairbanks and four Fairbanks Police Department officers over what he maintains was his wrongful imprisonment for the 1997
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VIDEO: LA County deputies fire non-lethal rounds at armed man

VIDEO: LA County deputies fire non-lethal rounds at armed man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A barricade involving an armed man in a liquor store came to a dramatic end when Los Angeles County deputies fired multiple non-lethal rounds at the defiant suspect Wednesday.
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 8, 1:28 AM
Police officers are given guns for a reason. The suspect continued to ignore police orders after being tased and walked into a liquor store, he left and they fired non-lethally on him, which he ignored and kept walking after they were seen tasing him again, and he still ignored them for a while and kept going. At which point do they say, "enough is enough," and break out the lethal force? By the time officers are done ecalating their requests, it may be too late and there may be casualties.
Masha Nuss's comment, December 8, 1:29 AM
Escalating* their force!
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LAPD launches paid training program for high school grads who want to be cops

LAPD launches paid training program for high school grads who want to be cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
More than two dozen high school graduates will be working part-time for the Los Angeles Police Department and getting paid as part of the inaugural class of a program that aims to recruit and train…
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Krista Scott's comment, December 4, 6:33 PM
This is pretty cool I kinda hope this is a starting point for other states to adopt a program like this. I think that the experience they will gain from this will be most beneficial for them. I think LAPD is getting their moneys worth by implementing such program.
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Justices to Ponder Need for Warrant for Cellphone Tower Data

Justices to Ponder Need for Warrant for Cellphone Tower Data | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Like almost everyone else in America, thieves tend to carry their cellphones with them to work.

When they use their phones on the job, police find it easier to do their jobs. They can get cellphon
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 10:38 PM
As I said before in previous comments, police being able to track citizens based on cell tower connection trails is akin to invasion of privacy. I think they should have warrants for doing this kind of thing, since it's a source of information the power over which could be easily abused, and my position on this is pretty solid; The fact that it significantly decreases crime rate is irrelevant in my opinion.
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"It’s been complete hell": how police used a traffic stop to take $91,800 from an innocent man

"It’s been complete hell": how police used a traffic stop to take $91,800 from an innocent man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Just hours after this story was published, a judge, with the backing of state legislators who read Vox’s reporting, ruled in favor of Phil Parhamovich — and he will get his $91,800 back.
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Watch: Policeman shoots fellow officer in struggle with suspect

Watch: Policeman shoots fellow officer in struggle with suspect | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The gaffe saw a US police officer shoot his colleague with a stun gun as they were trying to arrest a suspect.
Rob Duke's insight:
He thought his partner was sick, so he gave him a dose of "Edison Medicine"....

The jokes about Tasers will follow this officer/sergeant in a good-natured sort of way for the rest of their careers.
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San Francisco defends sanctuary status as backlash mounts

San Francisco defends sanctuary status as backlash mounts | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The attacks on San Francisco and other cities with similar immigration policies began moments after a jury acquitted
Rob Duke's insight:
California has been here before.  In 1982, and again in 1986, voters revolted against the liberal legislature and courts.  First, the voters approved Prop. 8 the "Victim's Bill of Rights" and then in 1986, voters recalled Rose Bird the Chief Justice of their Supreme Court.  Bird had voted to overturn 64 out of 64 death penalty cases and voters finally had had enough.  This coincided with a new era of Republican governors including George Deukmejian (1983 to 1991), Pete Wilson (1992-1999).
Seeing this decision and angst over Prop. 47 (crime reform), I wonder if a voter backlash isn't coming soon....
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California Proposition 8, Victims' Bill of Rights (June 1982) - Ballotpedia

California Proposition 8, Victims' Bill of Rights (June 1982) - Ballotpedia | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The official summary provided to describe Proposition 8 said:

"Amends Constitution and enacts several statutes concerning procedural treatment, sentencing, release, and other matters for accused and convicted persons. Includes provisions regarding restitution to victims from persons convicted of crimes, right to safe schools, exclusion of relevant evidence, bail, use of prior felony convictions for impeachment purposes or sentence enhancement, abolishing defense of diminished capacity, use of evidence regarding mental disorder, proof of insanity, notification and appearance of victims at sentencing and parole hearings, restricting plea bargaining, Youth Authority commitments, and other matters. Summary of Legislative Analyst's estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact; As the fiscal effect would depend on many factors that cannot be predicted, the net fiscal effect of this measure cannot be determined with any degree of certainty. However, approval of the measure would result in major state and local costs. The measure could: increase local administration costs; increase state administrative costs; increase claims against the state and local governments relating to enforcement of the right to safe schools; increase school security costs to provide safe schools; increase the cost of operating county jails by increasing the jail populations; increase court costs; and increase the cost of operating the state's prison system by increasing the prison population (estimated to be about $47 million increased annual prison operating costs and $280 million prison construction costs based on various assumptions)."
Rob Duke's insight:
This is background for my comments above re: the sanctuary city controversy in San Francisco.
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What’s at stake in Supreme Court warrantless cellphone searches case

What’s at stake in Supreme Court warrantless cellphone searches case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
What’s at stake in Supreme Court warrantless cellphone searches case
Rob Duke's insight:
We talked in class about some of the problems with treating cell phones in the same manner as other protected places (homes, papers, etc.).
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Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 2:51 AM
This is definitely a topic that would have very vehement arguments on both sides. While access to this information would definitely help police to be able to catch criminals faster and more efficiently. However, I know that I certainly would not want the government to be able to access my location at any given moment without some darn reasonable suspicion. I think they should have to get a warrant before accessing such sensitive information as location services.
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Police grooming exemption just in time for San Jose officer to be a groom

Police grooming exemption just in time for San Jose officer to be a groom | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For Officer Simratpal Brar, the San Jose Police Department did an about-face just in time for his imminent nuptials.


San Jose police Chief Eddie Garcia, left, meets with Officer Simratpal Brar at SJPD headquarters on Nov. 20, 2017. The department updated its grooming and dress policy to allow for religious exemptions, which allowed Brar to remain on patrol duty while growing a beard for his wedding in adherence to religious custom. (Robert Salonga/Bay Area News Group) 
Brar, who is Sikh, had to grow a beard for his upcoming Friday wedding to adhere to religious custom. But that ran counter to SJPD appearance policies that prohibited officers from having beards as part of its dress and grooming code.

In almost cosmic timing, the department just revised its duty manual to explicitly allow Chief Eddie Garcia the ability to grant exemptions for religious accommodations. Brar had already been cleared to start growing his beard while the policy revision was being vetted, but it officially was added to the duty manual Monday, just in time for Brar to become a groom exempt from the prescribed grooming.

“I am very excited, and my family is excited,” Brar said Monday. “Having this policy in place is very personal. Being able to portray myself as a Sikh officer like this is really an amazing experience. We are a large established community. To be able to represent the Sikh community is a great honor.”
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Jessica Obermiller's comment, November 23, 7:16 PM
What a fantastic change in policy. It should have never been a problem in the first place to allow for facial hair (or headscarves, piercings, facial tattoos, etc) for religious religions. I hope Officer Brar has a fantastic wedding and I am glad he is being allowed to follow the customs and rules of his religion.
Rob Duke's comment, November 26, 12:36 AM
I imagine those policies were a hold over from the 1970's when some officers grew hair longer and administrations felt they had to keep officers from looking like "hippies". The Punjabi's have a long and noble history of political, military and police careers, so this change will help attract these folks to similar careers in the U.S.
Masha Nuss's comment, December 6, 11:20 PM
I agree! It's such a beautiful article that portrays more openness and acceptance in our society. In looking through the comments on the actual articles, one person was saying something along the lines of, "as long as the officer will save my life, I don't care what they look like." That's how it should be! They're here to protect us and our community, not appeal to our own political/religious beliefs.
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Feds indict Philadelphia officer in corruption case against elite Baltimore police unit

Feds indict Philadelphia officer in corruption case against elite Baltimore police unit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Philadelphia police officer Eric Snell has been arrested on federal drug charges and accused of conspiring with a Baltimore detective to sell cocaine and heroin seized from Baltimore's streets.
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DS's curator insight, November 17, 3:41 PM

This article describes the difficulties associated with plain clothes (undercover) police work. The "Vice isn't nice" article by Porgrebin & Poole describes the effects of working undercover. Officers may begin to identify with criminals, becoming sympathetic with the reasons suspects commit crimes. Relationships may be formed with informants. The code of silence in Policing is similar to that of organized crime. These Officers may experience difficulty in their transition back to normal police work or civilian life.

 

This article describes how a police subculture can be formed as a result of undercover police work. Informant testimony should be corroborated. Sounds like an electronic recording will be used.  

 

 

Adam Osborne's comment, November 18, 6:59 PM
I got an idea of how cop subculture is made when undercover cops and it also sounds that, if they are to continue to work on the force, they would have a difficult time adjusting.