Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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'Privilege doesn't protect you': Facebook exec's brother dead after police encounter | US news | The Guardian

'Privilege doesn't protect you': Facebook exec's brother dead after police encounter | US news | The Guardian | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chinedu Okobi, who was unarmed and living with mental illness, died after being Tasered near San Francisco
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Chief psychiatrist says California inaccurate on prison data | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

Chief psychiatrist says California inaccurate on prison data | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The chief psychiatrist for California's prison system is alleging that state officials provided inaccurate or misleading information to a federal judge and inmates' attorneys.
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The Tenderloin and SoMa: San Francisco’s safe sites for drug dealers

The Tenderloin and SoMa: San Francisco’s safe sites for drug dealers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"There's one," the police sergeant said as we drove through the Tenderloin. "There's one of them there. That guy, see him?"
And another. And another. Sgt. Kevin Healy was showing me known drug dealers, and they were everywhere - swarming the neighborhood, chatting and smiling. They didn't seem to have a care in the world.
That's because they don't. Not in San Francisco.
"It's almost impossible to get convicted in this city," said Healy, who works in the Police Department's narcotics division. "The message needs to be sent that it's not OK to be selling drugs. It's not allowed anywhere else.
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Ferguson police chief quits to return to Miami

Ferguson police chief quits to return to Miami | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
MIAMI_More than two years ago, Delrish Moss, a former Miami police officer, was named police chief in Ferguson, Mo., after the controversial police shooting death of Michael Brown.

This week, Moss resigned and said he would return home.

According to the St. Louis-Post Dispatch, Moss is coming back to South Florida to help care for his sick mother.

"We've been very appreciative of his efforts here," Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III told the newspaper. "He came here with an open mind, and I think he learned to really embrace the community even though it was not very welcoming when he got here."

It's still unclear whether he will return to the Miami Police force.

Moss, who beat out 53 other candidates for the Ferguson job, became chief in May 2016. He had been a police officer at the Miami Police Department since 1984. He quickly rose through the ranks. After working as a detective in the homicide unit, he took over media and community relations in the late '90s.
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Kari Michael's comment, October 14, 11:34 PM
I know one thing that we've discussed a lot about in these is how a lot of people put the police force first and tend put their family on the back-burner. While Moss has a very colorful background and has clearly made a difference in Missouri, he is choosing to return to Miami to take care of his mother. It's nice to see a different side, one not media enforced or publically enforced of a resignation of an officer.
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Troopers, Fairbanks police release limited video of Christmas Eve fatal shooting | Local News | newsminer.com

Troopers, Fairbanks police release limited video of Christmas Eve fatal shooting | Local News | newsminer.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS—Fairbanks police and Alaska State Troopers defended their actions in the Christmas Eve shooting death of Cody Dalton Eyre during a joint media briefing at Fairbanks police headquarters Wednesday afternoon.
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Police subdue man with machete in New Orleans | Euronews

Police subdue man with machete in New Orleans | Euronews | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police have used a taser to subdue a man who brandished a machete in a park across from New Orleans City Hall.
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Anna Givens's comment, October 11, 1:49 PM
Interesting. "They're approaching me, they're approaching me!". Like the cops are in the wrong? What does he expect? He is in front of City Hall with a machete and it seems like he is trying to draw attention to how the police are doing something malicious.
Rob Duke's comment, October 13, 12:30 PM
It's tough to justify walking around in public with a huge knife when lone wolf terrorist attacks have been fairly common for some time now.
Kari Michael's comment, October 13, 3:03 PM
I agree. Plus, he was across from City Hall which makes it seem as though it could have been taken as a more serious threat. In Washington, people are allowed to carry weapons in the open, but if someone calls and reports it and says that they feel threatened, then it is no longer seen as okay and they shouldn't be showing their weapon, even if it isn't intended for any malicious activity.
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FBI's Fitness AP helps you determine if you're fit enough to be an agent

FBI's Fitness AP helps you determine if you're fit enough to be an agent | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Getting into the FBI is not easy, as the agency’s new “Do you have what it takes?” fitness app will happily tell you. The app, which was released in August 2018, walks users through the five legs of the fitness requirements former director James Comey re-implemented in 2015—daring them to achieve high scores on sit-ups, pull-ups, push-ups, a 300-meter dash, and a 1.5-mile run.
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Anna Givens's comment, October 11, 1:44 PM
The title of this article and the title of the article that it is linked to definitely contrast. I think fitness apps in generally have boomed in the last few years and everyone likes the ease of having workouts on their phone making it easy to get a sweat in pretty much anywhere. I like the idea of the app because it encourages people to get moving and lead an active lifestyle. BUT, the article that this link led me to talked about how the FBI is basically being accused of collecting data from those who download the app even though the app’s privacy policy states that the FBI does not collect any personal information associated with the use of this app. BUT, if you go to the FBI website and click through the longer privacy policy it states that individuals using the system are subjected to having all of their activities monitored and recorded by personnel authorized to do so by the FBI. The FBI denied the collection of data of app users and that they essentially have just one privacy policy related to their website instead of separate mobile policies. I personally think that if the FBI had interest in tracking you, they would find other ways outside of a fitness app, and if you aren’t doing anything illegal- it shouldn’t even matter.
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Blood of DUI Suspect May Be Drawn Without Warrant Where Driver Chooses That Test

The United States Supreme Court’s 2016 decision in Birchfield v. North Dakota, which holds that breath tests of suspected drunk drivers require no warrant but blood tests do, does not require exclusion of the results of a warrantless blood draw where the defendant opted for that alternative, the First District Court of Appeal held yesterday.

The opinion by Justice Alison M. Tucher of Div. Four affirms a decision of the Contra Costa Superior Court Appellate Division which reversed the granting of a suppression motion. The defendant, Elio Gutierrez, charged with driving under the influence, insisted that under Birchfield, a blood test may not be administered to determine blood alcohol content absent a warrant.

In Birchfield, Justice Samuel Alito wrote for the majority in saying that “[t]he physical intrusion” inherent in breath tests “is almost negligible” given that there is no piercing of the skin, merely an exhaling of air into a mouthpiece. He continued:

“The same cannot be said about blood tests. They ‘require piercing the skin’ and extract a part of the subject’s body,…and thus are significantly more intrusive than blowing into a tube.”
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Facebook Gave Data Access to Chinese Firm Flagged by U.S. Intelligence - The New York Times

Facebook Gave Data Access to Chinese Firm Flagged by U.S. Intelligence - The New York Times | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Facebook has data-sharing partnerships with at least four Chinese electronics companies, including a manufacturing giant that has a close relationship with China’s government, the social media company said on Tuesday.

The agreements, which date to at least 2010, gave private access to some user data to Huawei, a telecommunications equipment company that has been flagged by American intelligence officials as a national security threat, as well as to Lenovo, Oppo and TCL.

The four partnerships remain in effect, but Facebook officials said in an interview that the company would wind down the Huawei deal by the end of the week.

Facebook gave access to the Chinese device makers along with other manufacturers — including Amazon, Apple, BlackBerry and Samsung — whose agreements were disclosed by The New York Times on Sunday.
Rob Duke's insight:

Facebook will give away data to Chinese firms and government, but sues the U.S. DOJ for similar access.

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MDPS releases statement regarding Forest Hill band performance at Brookhaven High School, calls it “highly inappropriate”

MDPS releases statement regarding Forest Hill band performance at Brookhaven High School, calls it “highly inappropriate” | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Pictures of the Forest Hill High School halftime band performance during their game against Brookhaven High School are going viral on social media.

Many are saying the performance depicted students dressed as doctors and nurses holding SWAT team members at gunpoint.

Two Brookhaven police officers were killed in the line of duty responding to a shots fired call last week.
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Kari Michael's comment, October 14, 11:40 PM
This is just distasteful behavior. The mayor had stated that the performance was "inexcusable under any and all circumstances". I do not understand how anyone could try to convince themselves it was a “put down the guns and pray” depiction. If we want to help minimize problems, we have to start with our youth.
Rob Duke's comment, October 16, 12:41 PM
Still, how important is it for "us" to recognize that this is a major point of perception with this generation; and, how important is it to develop a plan to engage these young people in dialog? One of my professors always quoted Carl Sandberg: "Tomorrow's Children always have it their own way." What happens when these children are adults and have some political power?
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In Fresno, Agencies Fight Gangs With MAGEC

In Fresno, Agencies Fight Gangs With MAGEC | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FRESNO — Inside a faceless building in the middle of downtown Fresno, the newest great hope in California's war on crime is open for business. They call it MAGEC, one superagency devoted to one grand mission: wiping out street gangs in the 10th-largest county in the state.

In a back office, the local head of the FBI huddles with a police sergeant, promising to hand over three federal agents come Monday. Down the hall, detectives from the Fresno Police Department and the Fresno County Sheriff's Office are tracking the latest bloodshed between the Oriental Ruthless Boys and the Men of Destruction.

Darting to and fro are officers from Coalinga, Clovis, Sanger, the California Highway Patrol and state Bureau of Narcotics. Parole agents work alongside probation officers, and three prosecutors in corner offices juggle the usual fare--homicide, drive-by shootings and witness intimidation.
Rob Duke's insight:

I couldn't remember what Fresno's gang team's acronym meant the other day in class--so, here it is: Multi-Agency Gang Enforcement Consortium (MAGEC=pronounced Magic).

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Boan White's comment, October 9, 4:22 PM
A police task for geared towards putting gang members behind bars, it was bound to happen but it is nice to see it finally happening. The only thing I hope is that nothing screws it up.
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Laquan McDonald killing: Defense rests in Chicago Officer Jason Van Dyke's trial

Laquan McDonald killing: Defense rests in Chicago Officer Jason Van Dyke's trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The defense rested Wednesday in the murder trial of Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is charged with fatally shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald in 2014.
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Anna Givens's comment, October 11, 2:02 PM
I see and understand the outrage the citizens in Chicago are feeling. For over a year they had to pretty much only had what officer Van Dyke was stating about the incident, what was written on the police report. But as the dash cam tape was released and was completely contradictory- well, how do you expect them to feel? What Van Dyke said happened and what the video shows happened- are two completely different stories. The dash video clearly shows McDonald RUNNING away and not charging the police or raising a knife or Van Dyke. Possibly, the video doesn’t show anything- but Van Dyke began firing 6 seconds after arriving at the scene, enough time to really comprehend the whole situation? I feel for both sides in this situation. Was Van Dyke firing in the moment because he felt like other officers were in danger, was he making a split second decision? If so, I don’t think he needed to fire 16 times. McDonald lost his life too- so of course you are sympathetic. What do others think?
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Should police use of force be regulated? The answer isn't simple, and that's a problem

Should police use of force be regulated? The answer isn't simple, and that's a problem | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Christy Lopez, a law professor at Georgetown University, has worked with the Justice Department on 23 investigations looking at ways to improve police culture. She says departments have to look at what type of approach -- a guardian or warrior -- their officers typically use toward the public.
A guardian approach, Lopez says, looks at police as protectors within the community, whereas a warrior approach generally sees neighborhoods as a battlefield with police on one side and the bad guys on the other.

Police speak less respectfully to black drivers, study suggests
"When police conduct themselves in this manner in these communities, these communities feel police are not on their side and they're not there to protect them," she said of the warrior approach.
This leads to "a cycle where people are rude to police" because they feel oppressed, and police, in turn, feel disrespected or unappreciated, Lopez said.
During an announcement in which Paul, the Baton Rouge police chief, disciplined officers in the death of Sterling, he said dangerous situations could be defused if community members just complied with officers' commands.
"Treat our police officers with the respect that their position deserves," he said. "Please stop resisting. Stop running. When a police officer gives you direction, listen. Follow his directives. Listen to his instructions."
But activists are quick to point out that wasn't the case in the police shooting of Philando Castile, who appeared to comply with police orders during a traffic stop on July 6, 2016. Officer Jeronimo Yanez, who shot Castile, said he believed Castile was reaching for his firearm, which the officer told him not to do. Before dying, Castile said he was reaching for his wallet to retrieve his permit to carry.
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Union Boss: NYC Must ‘Shut Down’ Juvenile Detention Center To Protect Guards From 16-Year-Olds

Union Boss: NYC Must ‘Shut Down’ Juvenile Detention Center To Protect Guards From 16-Year-Olds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The leader of a New York City correction officers’ union has called on government officials to close a new youth detention facility until the guards can protect themselves from the teenagers they supervise.
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President Trump Delivers Speech to IACP Conference - Videos - POLICE Magazine

President Donald Trump delivered a speech to attendees at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference in Orlando on Monday. Opening his remarks to the assembled law enforcement leaders at the annual conference, Trump said, "I have great, great love for what you do and the way you do it."

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Ore. FBI agent shot by booby-trapped wheelchair

Ore. FBI agent shot by booby-trapped wheelchair | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The federal agent and state officers triggered a tripwire inside a home during an investigation
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U.S. Border Agency Says Hundreds of Employees Have Been Arrested Over 2 Years

U.S. Border Agency Says Hundreds of Employees Have Been Arrested Over 2 Years | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Customs and Border Protection said that the more than 500 agents and officers who were charged with drug trafficking and other crimes in 2016 and 2017 represent “a fraction of the organization.”
Rob Duke's insight:

It'd be more surprising if this weren't true.

Institutions are encouraging this corruption with closed borders and criminalized drugs, which compound the incentives for payoffs to look the other way.  Once you've looked the other way, they can extort further cooperation.

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Are liberals and populists just searching for a new master? - Open Future

Are liberals and populists just searching for a new master? - Open Future | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

The rise of populism, nativism and nationalism in recent years has challenged perceptions of what ordinary people want from politicians. Some see the anti-establishment trend as a rejection of centralised power. Others suggest the real hunger is for a moral authority that appears to be lacking in today’s capitalism.

Among the latter group is Slavoj Zizek, a Marxist philosopher at the University of Ljubljana. He criticises the appeal of political correctness, questions the ability of markets to survive without state intervention and excoriates what he sees as the ulterior motives behind fair-trade coffee. 

His latest book, “Like a Thief in Broad Daylight”, explores the changing nature of social progress in what he calls an “era of post-humanity”. Mr Zizek responded to five questions as part of The Economist’s Open Future initiative. His replies are followed by an excerpt from the book. 


The Economist: What do you mean by “the era of post-humanity”? What characterises it?

Slavoj Zizek: It is not primarily the automatisation and robotisation of the production process but much more the expanding role of science, machines and digital media in social control and regulation. The detailed registration of all our acts and habits enables the digital machine to know ourselves, even our psyche, better than we know ourselves. In this way, social control no longer needs to be exerted in the old “totalitarian” mode, through open domination—we are already manipulated and regulated when we act freely, just following our needs and desires. 

But there is another feature which justifies the term “post-humanity”: the prospect of the direct link between our brain and the digital network. When this happens, we lose the basic distance which makes us human, the distance between external reality and our inner life where we can “think what we want.” With my thoughts, I can directly intervene in reality—but the machine also directly knows what I think. 


In the last years of his life, Stephen Hawking experimented with a technology to communicate with the world—his brain was connected to a computer, so that his thoughts could choose words and form sentences, which were then relayed to a voice synthesizer to be spoken aloud. Fredric Jameson noted that, today, it is much more easy to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. This sarcastic insight is today becoming reality: it looks that, in some new form, capitalism will effectively survive the end, not of the world, but of humanity.

The Economist: Brexit and the rise of populist politicians seem to show that voters want to be protected from the harder edges of globalisation. So, back to Jameson’s thought, is it still easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of the free-market consensus associated with Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan?

Mr Zizek: As with fascism, I think that populism is simply a new way to imagine capitalism without its harder edges; a capitalism without its socially disruptive effects. Populism is one of today’s two opiums of the people: one is the people, and the other is opium itself. Chemistry (in its scientific version) is becoming part of us: large aspects of our lives are characterised by the management of our emotions by drugs, from everyday use of sleeping pills and antidepressants to hard narcotics. We are not just controlled by impenetrable social powers, our very emotions are “outsourced” to chemical stimulation. What remains of the passionate public engagement in the West is mostly the populist hatred, and this brings us to the other second opium of the people, the people itself, the fuzzy populist dream destined to obfuscate our own antagonisms. 

The Economist: In 1968, Jacques Lacan told student protesters in Paris that “what you aspire to as revolutionaries is a new master. You will get one.” Does the appeal of populists and so-called strong-men reflect a desire for authority that liberal democracy can't provide?

Mr Zizek: Yes, but in a way different from the one that Lacan had in mind in his pessimist reading of the 1968 turmoil. For Lacan, the consequence of 1968 was the decline of the old (directly authoritarian) figure of the master and the rise of a new master figure, than of the expert—what Lacan baptised the “university discourse.” Just think about how today economic measures are justified—not as an expression of political will and positive social vision but as a consequence of neutral knowledge: it has to be done, this is how markets work.

Just recall how the experts in Brussels acted in negotiations with Greece’s Syriza government during the euro crisis in 2014: no debate, this has to be done. I think that today’s populism reacts to the fact that experts are not really masters, that their expertise doesn’t work—again, just remember how the 2008 financial meltdown caught the experts unprepared. Against the background of this fiasco, the traditional authoritarian master is making a comeback, even if it is a clown. Whatever Trump is, he is not an expert.

The Economist: Do you want a new master?

Mr Zizek: Surprisingly, YES, I do want it. But what kind of master? We usually see a master as someone who exerts domination, but there is another, more authentic, sense of a master. A true master is not an agent of discipline and prohibition, his message is not “You cannot!”, nor “You have to…!”, but a releasing “You can!”—what? Do the impossible, ie, what appears impossible within the coordinates of the existing constellation. And today, this means something very precise: you can think beyond capitalism and liberal democracy as the ultimate framework of our lives. 

A master is a vanishing mediator who gives you back to yourself, who delivers you to the abyss of your freedom. When we listen to a true leader, we discover what we want (or, rather, what we “always-already” wanted without knowing it). A master is needed because we cannot accede to our freedom directly—for to gain this access, we have to be pushed from outside, since our “natural state” is one of inert hedonism; of what Alain Badiou called the “human animal.” 

The underlying paradox here is that the more we live as “free individuals with no master,” the more we are effectively non-free, caught within the existing frame of possibilities. We have to be pushed or disturbed into freedom by a master.

The Economist: You have argued for the "occupation" of the digital grid, but how can ordinary people hold big tech firms to account if only a tiny fraction of us are capable of comprehending an algorithm?

Mr Zizek: True, we—the majority—don’t understand the details of algorithms, but we can easily understand how we are controlled by the digital grid. Moreover, I don’t think the experts themselves fully understand how the digital grid really works, plus those who exploit their knowledge also do not know the technical details. 

Do you think that when Steve Bannon mobilised Cambridge Analytica, he understood the algorithmic details of its work? Or take ecology: to grasp global warming and the ozone hole, you need science which most of us don’t understand, but we nonetheless can fight against the prospect of ecological catastrophe. 

There are risks of manipulation here, of course, but we have to accept them. We have to abandon the naïve faith in the spontaneous wisdom of everyday people as a guideline of our acts. That’s the paradox of our era: our most ordinary daily lives are regulated by scientific knowledge, and the dangers of this (often invisible) regulation can be fought only by a different knowledge, not by New Age wisdoms and common sense.    

*      *      *

From “Like a Thief in Broad Daylight: Power in the Era of Post-Humanity,” by Slavoj Zizek. 

In a hotel in Skopje, Macedonia, where I recently stayed, my companion inquired if smoking is permitted in our room, and the answer she got from the receptionist was unique: “Of course not, it is prohibited by the law. But you have ashtrays in the room, so this is not a problem.” The contradiction (between prohibition and permission) was openly assumed and thereby cancelled, treated as inexistent, i.e., the message was: “It’s prohibited, and here it is how you do it.” When we entered the room, a further surprise awaited us: an ashtray with the sign of the prohibition to smoke…


Maybe, this incident provides the best metaphor for our ideological predicament today.  I remember a similar incident from my military service 40 years ago. One morning, the first class was on international military law, them among other rules, the officer mentioned that it is prohibited to shoot at parachuters while they are still in the air, i.e., before they touch ground. In a happy coincidence, our next class was about rifle shooting, and the same officer taught us how to target a parachuter in the air (how, while aiming at it, one should take into account the velocity of his decent and the direction and strength of the wind, etc.). When one of the soldiers asked the officer about the contradiction between this lesson and what we learned just an hour before (the prohibition to shoot at parachuters), the officer just snapped back with a cynical laughter: “How can you be so stupid? Don’t you understand how life works?” What goes on today is that a dissonance is openly admitted and for that reason treated as irrelevant, like our example of the ashtray with the sign of prohibition of smoking. Recall the debates on torture – was the stance of the US authorities not something like: “Torture is prohibited, and here is how you do a water-boarding.”?

The paradox is thus that today, there is in some way less deception than in a more traditional functioning of ideology: nobody is really deceived. One has to avoid a crucial misunderstanding here: it is not that prior to our time we took the rules and prohibitions seriously while today we openly violate them. What changed are the rules which regulate appearances, i.e., what can appear in public space. Let’s compare the sexual lives of two US presidents, Kennedy and Trump. As we know now, Kennedy had numerous affairs, but the press and TV ignored all this, while Trump’s every (old and new) step is followed by the media – not to mention that Trump also speaks publicly in an obscene way that we cannot even imagine Kennedy doing it. The gap that separates the dignified public space from its obscene underside is now more and more transposed into public space, with ambiguous consequences: inconsistencies and violations of public rules and openly accepted or at least ignored, but, simultaneously, we are all becoming openly aware of these inconsistencies.

Excerpted from “Like a Thief in Broad Daylight:  Power in the Era of Post-Humanity”. Copyright © 2018 by Slavoj Zizek. Used with permission of Allen Lane. All rights reserved.

Rob Duke's insight:

I know this is tangential, but it somehow seems related to the problem of policing.

...and, besides I just like Zizek...for his ideas and his humor.  See the excerpt below to see glimmers of that humor.

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How stop-and-frisk went off the rails - NY Daily News

How stop-and-frisk went off the rails - NY Daily News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The CompStat process began in 1994 under then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani and his first police commissioner, Bill Bratton. They had an easy act to follow. The crime numbers then were incredibly high, so virtually any new, effective strategy would make whoever was sitting there look good. Even the Republican-despising City Council had to lay low, because its members knew the public was truly fed up.

Internal to the police department, commanding officers began to face monthly numbers-based "interrogations" to test their cognizance of crime conditions and share their strategies in dealing with the trends.

Most captains, including myself, would rather have had monthly root canals. But we soon realized that the process made us all sharper, more focused and, quite frankly, smarter.

It worked. In a relatively short amount of time, crime started falling and falling rapidly. CompStat's role was to ensure quality strategic policing.

Under Bloomberg, however, things started to change.
Rob Duke's insight:

An article to help with this week's discussion.

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Facebook cracking down on police using fake profiles to detect illegal activity

Facebook cracking down on police using fake profiles to detect illegal activity | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Facebook does not like LEOs using fake profiles to monitor illegal activity. They’ve taken steps to notify Memphis PD of their displeasure.
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Boan White's comment, October 9, 4:13 PM
I am not seeing a big threat, except for the breach in policy, that the police have performed on Facebook. I they are only watching and friending those that are known to monitor illegal activities what it the harm? How is that different from someone going to their friend's page and looking at their posts or following them on Facebook? The only thing I think that the Memphis police should have done differently is that they should have contacted Facebook first to let them know what they police where planning so that they could hopefully be allowed as an exception to the rule.
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Facebook wins court battle over law enforcement access to encrypted phone calls

Facebook wins court battle over law enforcement access to encrypted phone calls | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge in California ruled this month that the government cannot force Facebook to break the encryption on its popular Messenger voice app in a criminal case in which agents wanted to intercept a suspect’s conversations, according to several individuals familiar with the case.
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IACP 2018

IACP 2018 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Axon is unveiling new products on October 6th. See what got us here and stay tuned for more.
Rob Duke's insight:

Well the new Taser 7 is no "death ray" or photon shooting phaser, but it still looks pretty cool.

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Axon To Unveil Next Generation TASER Weapon on October 6 at IACP

Axon To Unveil Next Generation TASER Weapon on October 6 at IACP | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Oct. 2, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Axon (Nasdaq: AAXN), the global leader in connected law enforcement technologies, today announced that it will unveil a new TASER weapon and body camera at the 125th International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. The announcement will be made at Axon's 25th Anniversary Party, which will celebrate Axon's 25 year history of technology innovation in the public safety space. Axon CEO and founder Rick Smith will announce the new products to a sold-out audience of around 3,000 global law enforcement professionals on Saturday, October 6th at the House of Blues, Orlando, Fla.

"Since the launch of our first TASER device, public safety officers have saved more than 200,000 lives from death or serious injury using TASER conducted energy weapons in situations where lethal force could have been used instead," says Smith. "It has been a privilege to innovate in the public safety space for the last 25 years and we hope these new product launches demonstrate that we're still just getting started."

Axon will showcase its new products at the IACP Axon booth, October 7-9.

Rob Duke's insight:

Oooh....please let it be phasers....

 

If not that then maybe we'll get a freeze-ray....

 

Tune in tonight to find out.

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Van Dyke trial: Chicago police officer found guilty of second-degree murder for shooting Laquan McDonald - The

Van Dyke trial: Chicago police officer found guilty of second-degree murder for shooting Laquan McDonald - The | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The officer was found guilty nearly four years after firing 16 shots at the teenager, who was holding a knife.
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Boan White's comment, October 9, 4:27 PM
I thought we were supposed to be moving forward not back when it comes to building better relationships with the public? I also thought we were training our police officers to not shoot on sight, unless absolutely necessary?
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Florence, South Carolina, shooting: 1 officer killed, 4 others injured

Florence, South Carolina, shooting: 1 officer killed, 4 others injured | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
One law enforcement officer was killed and four others injured in a shooting in Florence, South Carolina, according to CNN affiliate WMBF.
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