Plate Tectonics
513 views | +0 today
Follow
Plate Tectonics
Earth and Space (Stage 5) SHE Outcome: A student explains how scientific knowledge about global patterns of geological activity and interactions involving global systems can be used to inform decisions related to contemporary issues ES2 The theory of plate tectonics explains global patterns of geological activity and continental movement. Students: a. outline how the theory of plate tectonics changed ideas about the structure of the Earth and continental movement over geological time b. relate movements of the Earth's plates to mantle convection currents and gravitational forces c. outline how the theory of plate tectonics explains earthquakes, volcanic activity and formation of new landforms
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Katherine Crnkovic
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Mountaintop to Ocean Trench

Infographic: Mountaintop to Ocean Trench | Plate Tectonics | Scoop.it
Explore the entire Earth's surface from highest peaks to mysterious depths.
Katherine Crnkovic's insight:

This infographic is a scale representation of the earth from the edge of our atmosphere to the bottom of the deepest ocean trench. The labelled scale shows the heights of mountain peaks, manmade structures, animals living at extreme altitudes and natural boundaries to human exploration.

Supporting teaching and Learning: The idea of scale can be a difficult concept for students to understand especially at larger scales where numbers are beyond comprehension. Mountaintop to Ocean Trench is a useful tool to allow students to appreciate the significance and consequences of continental motion by explicitly showing the scale of mountains and deep ocean trenches compared to objects and ideas that may be familiar to students, such as building heights and diving depths. As a teaching tool, the colourful visual picture and short bursts of information should attract student interest, as well as building on literacy (including interpreting information and making connections) and numeracy (thinking in terms of altitude, temperature and pressure including conversions). In the classroom, this infographic could be used as a tool in consolidating ideas about plate tectonics. Students could be asked to choose 5 points on the scale (e.g. mountain peaks, ocean trench) and interpret the information provided in terms of tectonic processes (convergent boundary, fold mountain, volcano).

Justification: This resource is visually attractive and shows a scale representation of altitude in pictures, words and numbers. Students should find the information easy to decode in order to appreciate the power of tectonic motions in shaping our world. The original scale that I found was also interactive, following the journey of a man from space to mountain climbing, diving, and eventually being eaten by a sea monster but that site has since been removed and replaced by this simpler version.

Strengths: The resource is a nice visual representation of the scale of the earth, with short snippets of information which should make it appealing and unintimidating to students. Students can view and process the information themselves, or as part of a more structured discussion or activity. The graphic gives information on a variety of different objects and organisms at different altitudes, giving a good overview of the world, and also promoting student interest and possible further research.

Weaknesses: The resource requires students to scroll down a page in order to see all of the information so that students can never see the whole scale. Some information, such as the world’s tallest building, needs to be revised as it is no longer correct. There are some words, terms, and landmarks which students may never have heard of and some information which may need to be expanded on by the teacher or through further research to be meaningful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Katherine Crnkovic
Scoop.it!

Discover Our Earth

Discover Our Earth | Plate Tectonics | Scoop.it
Katherine Crnkovic's insight:

Discover Our Earth is a website which contains information about tectonic theory, earthquakes, volcanoes, and landforms supported by illustrations, animations, and short interactive activities.

Supporting Teaching and Learning: Discover Our Earth presents a basic overview of plate tectonics as well as disasters and landforms. It is a nice resource because text-based information is supported by illustrations, animations, or interactive activities to engage students. Students are required to read information which links to an illustration or activity. Most activities or animations have an explanation in the text, which prompts students to notice and understand the concept introduced. This resource provides a nice overview of a number of aspects of tectonic theory, and could be used as a consolidation activity. Some of the information presented is a little beyond what would normally be taught in the syllabus, so in the classroom I might use this as an extension activity for early finishing students. They could be given a link to the site and be asked to explore the information and activities in order to expand their knowledge. Alternatively, the resource could be used as a consolidation tool towards the end of a unit, with students asked to explore the site in order to complete a worksheet or research task. Teachers could also use the animations or activities on the site to demonstrate ideas to students during classroom explanations.

Justification: The site would be a good link for a research task because it can be used as a stand-alone resource, allowing the teacher to scaffold research using the internet. Most of the information is presented in the form of text, which contains a number of subject-specific and context-specific words which make the resource a good consolidation activity, rather than an introduction activity. The site features maps which illustrate the occurrence of earthquakes, volcanoes, and landforms over time, and which may be viewed according to globe or continent. Each activity or animation is followed by a “what do you think” section which highlights the meaning of the information presented, making this a good resource for extending student thinking, with or without input from the teacher. Information presented is always related to particular landforms, continents, or areas, making the information relevant and also reminding students of scenarios in the real world. Text is presented only in short paragraphs, so that while subject-specific literacy is required, students should not be inhibited by the amount of text presented.

Strengths: Information is presented in a neat, linear sequence which is easy for students to navigate as they move down the list of topics presented on the left of the page. Each page of information connects to a short animation or activity which supports student understanding of the content. Real-world examples, scenarios, and applications are highlighted, often in the form of labelled maps and diagrams. Illustrations, animations, and activities make the site more interesting and engaging to students. Content addresses and surpasses that which would be taught in class, making this a possible extension resource for early finishers.

Weaknesses: The layout of the site is simple, but may be boring to students who are not easily engaged. Some maps and activities appear as pop-ups which cannot be resized, and may be too small for some students to view. Text contains many subject-specific words which may provide a barrier to understanding in weak readers. There are no options to make the resource more accessible to students with disability. Some content surpasses the curriculum requirements, and may be too advanced for students to understand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Katherine Crnkovic
Scoop.it!

Discovery Kids: Volcano Explorer

Discovery Kids: Volcano Explorer | Plate Tectonics | Scoop.it
Make a Volcano
Katherine Crnkovic's insight:

Volcano Explorer is a site in which students learn about volcanoes and then engage in a short interactive activity where they select the viscosity and gas concentration of the magma and watch as their volcano erupts. They are then given information about the type of volcano they have created.

Supporting Teaching and Learning: Volcano Explorer is an online resource which could be used to support student learning as a short research or consolidation activity. It provides a small amount of information about volcanoes in the global perspective (related to plate tectonic theory), volcano types (landforms), and the structural features of a volcano. Included is a short activity in which students choose the viscosity of magma (4 levels) and the concentration of dissolved gas (low or high) in order to create a volcano. Having created a volcano, the student then watches an animation of it erupting and is presented with the name and basic information which best describes their volcano. There are 6 possible types of volcano. This resource could be used as the source for a short research activity in the classroom in which students fill in a worksheet about volcanoes, with the activity used as an investigation task where students fill in a table to illustrate the effect of viscosity and gas on volcanic eruptions.

Justification: Volcano explorer features realistic illustrations of the features and eruption of volcanoes. It provides a good overview of volcanoes in the form of text, which contains formal and subject-specific language, to aid students in developing their scientific literacy. Information provided in the text is concise and simple to read. Examples of volcano types are given, which allows students to connect the information to real world scenarios, and also allow teachers to expand on the information in order to better link it to previous learning (why might we see a shield volcano in Hawaii in terms of plate tectonics?).

Strengths: The Volcano Explorer is visually appealing and interactive, giving students a chance to explore and interact with features of volcanoes. As a research or investigation activity it is useful for a normal theory class where students are “experimenting” with volcano features without performing a messy prac. The animations are simple and quick to load. The page is nicely set out and text is broken up to avoid overloading students with written information.

Weaknesses: The resource contains some distances which are in miles and would need to be converted to be meaningful in the Australian context. Text is not narrated and there are no opportunities to alter the resource to increase accessibility. The resource is located on a webpage which also contains advertisements and links to games and other activities which may distract students working on personal laptops.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Katherine Crnkovic
Scoop.it!

Evolution – what next?

Evolution – what next? | Plate Tectonics | Scoop.it
Katherine Crnkovic's insight:

What Next? is a representation of the earth beginning with the Big Bang and moving through time to the present day. Time is shown in terms of years ago and on a scale which becomes progressively finer towards the present day. Events in geological and human history are shown, such as the development of the earth, evolution of life, movement of continents, and major human discoveries.

Supporting Teaching and Learning: This interactive resource is a nice tool for allowing students to visualise the progression of time. As students study plate tectonics, they will be required to think about time in terms of millions of years into the past, and in terms of eons and ages which they may find difficult to comprehend. This resource is a visual guide to geological time, showing a countdown to the present as well as a scale which becomes a timeline showing major events. In the classroom, the use of this resource needs to be moderated by the teacher so that the relevant events can be seen, rather than allowing students to investigate the resource individually. Using a similar resource on prac, I found that the students were more engaged when we went through a resource like this as a class, and I could comment on any image that caught student attention.

Justification: Geological time is a difficult concept to comprehend, but I believe that this resource is a good way to visualise events which occurred in the distant past or over millions of years. It is a nice interactive resource, with visual representations supported by text. Students can develop literacy skills through reading the text as well as visualising processes described in words through the accompanying illustrations. More importantly numeracy skills are developed as students interpret time through dates, time periods, and the countdown to the present day.

Strengths: The resource shows progression of time using a scale which is easy to navigate and allows the user to scroll forwards and backwards in time. It presents a lot of information including the history of elements, the universe, earth, evolution, and human history, making it flexible as a tool for a short activity or a long discussion about time. In terms of plate tectonics, the resource shows the formation of the earth, the movement of continents, snowball earth, and changes to the earth’s magnetic field over time.

Weaknesses: This resource is best used as a teacher mediated class activity because the screen becomes very busy, and students may be easily distracted by the number of illustrations which eventually build up on the page. If students are allowed to navigate the resource alone, they may scroll too fast and miss important information or become overloaded by the sheer amount of information that the resource presents.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Katherine Crnkovic
Scoop.it!

BBC - GCSE Bitesize: Plate tectonics activity

BBC - GCSE Bitesize: Plate tectonics activity | Plate Tectonics | Scoop.it
A secondary school revision resource for OCR GCSE 21st Century Science about the Earth, space and plate tectonics
Katherine Crnkovic's insight:

The Plate Tectonics Activity consists of a short animation followed by a short quiz. The animation addresses many ideas within plate tectonics including continental drift, the structure of the earth, and the history of tectonic theory.

Supporting Teaching and Learning: The Plate Tectonics Activity is a resource which could be used as a quick introduction or overview of the plate tectonics topic area. It covers the main teaching areas within the topic, including PFA’s (earth structure, continental drift) and SHE outcomes (Alfred Wagener). The animation itself is fast paced and many terms are explained or represented as analogy, making this a good hook for the start of the lesson, or an end of lesson consolidation activity rather than a stand-alone teaching material. When I was on prac, my cooperating teacher used similar activities in classes from year 7-12. If viewing the animation on a smart board, a student may be given control of the computer and the responsibility to count the class vote on the answers the quiz.

Justification: I like this animation because it is dynamic and interesting and gives a good overview of most ideas that I would teach within the plate tectonics subject area.

Strengths: The animation presents information through narrated illustrations and diagrams. It includes an option for subtitles which can be used for students with hearing difficulties, and an option to pause and/or go back if the teacher wants to elaborate a point further. The animation finishes with a quiz composed of four questions based on the content of the animation. The questions are simple, but may highlight gaps or misconceptions in student knowledge. The entire activity takes about five minutes to complete, making it a flexible resource which can be incorporated into a lesson. Its dynamic and fast paced nature could make it a good hook for the start of a lesson if students are slow to settle, or a quick consolidation activity for the last few minutes of class.

Weaknesses: The animation is very busy and contains a number of references and analogies that students may not understand. Illustrations and analogies are simplified and may not represent an some ideas accurately, which has the potential to confuse some students. At times, illustrations accompanying ideas are abstract or irrelevant, which could distract students from the main points discussed. Some references are cultural or context specific and may be misinterpreted by some students. Poor English speakers may have trouble interpreting the information if they cannot understand the narration.

more...
No comment yet.