Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates
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Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates
An art collaboration between students from UNWRA schools in Gaza and Chelsea Community Hospital School in London
Curated by CCHS School
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Photgraphs of the Plates

These 21 handmade plates are the result on an on-going partnership between UNWRA (United Nations Relief and Work Agency) schools in Gaza and Chelsea Community Hospital School in London.

The plates will be displayed at Leighton House as part of this year's Nour Festival.http://www.nourfestival.co.uk/

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Plates on display at Leighton House

Shaun and Alan installed the plates at Leighton House to fit in harmoniously with the existing collection. For two weeks they will be on display as part of this year's Nour festival.

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Nour Festival - Home

Nour Festival of Arts 2012 - Contemporary art, film, music, literature from the Middle East and North Africa...
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Budoor

Budoor | Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates | Scoop.it

Place: Leighton HouseTime: 10

3.Team: Budoor, Jo, Shaun, Laura, Saed, 4.Dan, Evian, Grace, Jesse, Angelika, Fred,

5.Martin, Mohammed, Jehan and Alex

6. We did a book we used pictures and we 7.cut and sliced and did sticking

8. I felt happy.

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Original pictures from Gaza

The students from Gaza  produced a collection of drawings depicting their traditions and everyday life in Palestine. These drawings were then scanned and emailed to the Hospital School in London, where students had been making ceramic plates during their pottery classes and after-school activities. The drawings were then transferred onto the ceramic plates by a series of technical processes which the students had practised and perfected.

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Book making

Book making | Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates | Scoop.it

We worked together to make books showing the original pictures, the plates and descriptive text both in Arabic and English. We titled the book 'Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates'.

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Mohammed Fathi Altatari's comment, January 16, 2013 4:38 PM
great work we did
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Participant's Comments

Participant's Comments | Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates | Scoop.it

Here are a range of comments by students and staff from the book making workshops.

 

Budoor:

It was good because we did new things. I have enjoyed it as the pictures we used were marvellous.

Grace:

I like yesterday’s work as I loved the place. I talked to some different people and I enjoyed the chocolates!

Evian:

I liked cutting the papers it was just fun! I liked the plates and I hoped to get them into my house! I felt like with my family!

Saed:

I liked the pictures.

Muhammed:

Yesterday was a marvellous day! I liked cooperation and sharing ideas!

Jehan:

I loved working with the students.

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The plates have different themes to do with everyday life of Palestinian traditions.

The plates have different themes to do with everyday life of Palestinian traditions. | Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates | Scoop.it

Some of the themes:

 

The autumn olive harvest is traditionally a joyful and celebrated time of the year in Palestinian communities.

 

Palestinian farmers grow wheat to feed themselves and to provide straw for there animals. The traditional industry goes back history to the Canaanites.

 

One of the most important features is their dress. Bedouin women wear an enormous ‘tob’ or ‘thobe’ which is usually dark blue with colour full embodied decoration worn with lots of jewellery.

 

Fishing with nets is one of the oldest industries in Palestine.

 

Hopscotch was and still is the most common game for little girls.

 

One important industry is related to making dresses either sewing, embroidery, weaving or appliqué.

 

The tabun has been used for hundreds of ears especially in villages.

 

Traditionally Palestinian women used a hand mill to reduce things like beans, chickpeas and lentils into smaller peaces.

 

Palestinian women used to transport water from wells or small springs into their houses using jars.

 

The kuttab was the earliest school ever known in the Arab world.

 

Henna would be brought by the groom’s family and pained on the bride’s hands.

 

Licorice is the root from which a curious sweet flavour can be extracted.

 

They are making traditional flatbread cooked over inverted griddle.

 

A Palestinian women us harvesting olives.

 

This woman is preparing the dough for bread making.

 

This man is making and decorating a oven made of clay.

 

They hold sticks to dance in the streets and show happiness to the bride groom.

 

A hand holding olive branch hoping to get an independent Palestinian state this is also a symbol of peace.

 

A Palestinian women is mixing and harvesting olives,

 

People join to look at a man holding a olive branch for a symbol of peace and hoping to get a independent Palestinian state.

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My Day at Leighton house by Saed

My Day at Leighton house by Saed | Crossing Borders - A Festival of Plates | Scoop.it

My Day at Leighton house

On the 19th November jehan and Mohammed, two visitors fromGaza,Palestine and CCHS team met in Leighton house to do ‘a festival of plates’ project. This project started between two schools in theGaza strip ofPalestine and theChelseaCommunityHospitalSchool inLondon. Anyway so the drawings from students inGaza were put onto some plates by students at theHospitalSchool and were shown at the Leighton house exhibition. First we started off by Martin talking about something to do with the project when I and Fred arrived late at Leighton house. Jo, Mohammed and Jehan showed us a PowerPoint about their life inGaza and about our teachers’ visit to their schools. After that we separated into groups and each of us were told to cut up pictures and stick them to make our books. It was like a factory with all of us cutting the pictures and sticking them on the books we were making. We had to keep cutting the sticking tape so it did not run out. Laura was the first to complete her book I was the last to complete my book.

While we were doing the books Jo and Jehan were being interviewed by a (maybe French, but I am not sure) photographer. They were talking about how the project has started while they were being filmed by the photographer (who might be French), apparently this was Jehan’s second time inLondon, the first time was when Jo and Jehan met. Then the others, including Jo went on the minibus to drop off the other children at their locations. Fred and I walked back to Collingham which was not fair because I wanted to go on the minibus. When we arrived at Collingham the others were all relaxed whilst we had to walk for a miles, that was my strange day at Leighton house.

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