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A Covert Operation by a Plant Pathogen

A Covert Operation by a Plant Pathogen | Plants | Scoop.it
The must have cartoon for any folks intersted in host-microbe interactions!

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Frontiers | Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis | Plant Biotechnology

Frontiers | Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis | Plant Biotechnology | Plants | Scoop.it
Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.
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Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Best of Plants 2014: A few research highlights, summaries and educational resources, and some fun

Best of Plants 2014: A few research highlights, summaries and educational resources, and some fun | Plants | Scoop.it

A very few research highlights

Biosensors: Plant biologists FRET over stress. Two independent research labs have developed fluorescent biosensors to report the levels of the stress hormone, abscisic acid, within cells in living plants in real-time. http://elifesciences.org/content/3/e02763

PLETHORA gradient formation mechanism separates auxin responses. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v515/n7525/full/nature13663.html

Multiscale digital Arabidopsis predicts individual organ and whole-organism growth. http://www.pnas.org/content/111/39/E4127.abstract

The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a

Plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers. http://www.plantcell.org/content/26/7/2996.abstract

Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v510/n7503/full/nature13179.html

A reference genome for common bean and genome-wide analysis of dual domestications. http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v46/n7/full/ng.3008.html

 

Research syntheses and other educational resources

The Art of Being Flexible: How to Escape from Shade, Salt, and Drought http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/166/1/5

Epigenetic Memory for Stress Response and Adaptation in Plants http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/content/55/11/1859.abstract

Traversing organizational scales in plant salt-stress responses http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1369526614001435

Rice special issue in Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/outlook/rice/

Plant Physiology published Focus Issues on

Water (http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/164/4.toc),  

Roots (http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/166/2.toc),

Weed Control (http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/166/3.toc),  and

The Plant Cell started the year with an excellent set of review articles on Photobiology (http://www.plantcell.org/content/26/1.toc).

CourseSource. CourseSource is an open-access journal of peer-reviewed teaching resources for undergraduate biological sciences; the development of these resources, including plant-based resources, was supported by ASPB and BSA. http://www.coursesource.org/

The Plant Detectives Manual. A research-led approach for teaching plant science, by Gonzalo M. Estavillo, Ulrike Mathesius, Michael Djordjevic and Adrienne B. Nicotra. http://press.anu.edu.au/titles/anu-etext/the-plant-detectives-manual/

Campus Flora Oz App. Explore campus flora on your phone! https://campusflora.wordpress.com/

Countdown to 400: Oxford Herbarium’s ongoing weekly series of plants, counting downt to its 400th anniversary!  http://herbaria.plants.ox.ac.uk/bol/plants400

In 2014, Teaching Tools in Plant Biology started a series of topics on plant physiology, including water relations and plant nutrition! http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/teaching.xhtml

 

Finally, some end of year fun

Fifi the Oomycete, a holiday song, by Kamoun Lab. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9ikfDWZaT8&feature=youtu.be

#AdventBotany. By Alastair Culham and Dr. M. (AKA Jonathan Mitchley) (@BotanyRNG and @drmgoeswild) http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg/2014/12/page/4/ & http://drmgoeswild.com/advent-botany/


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Carla Pinheiro's curator insight, December 31, 2014 5:23 AM

A great tool to explore subcellular compartmentalization

Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Beautiful Chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry | Plants | Scoop.it
Beautiful Chemistry is a project collaboration between the Institute of Advanced Technology at the University of Science and Technology of China and Tsinghua University Press. The goal of this project is to bring the beauty of chemistry to the general public through digital media and technology.

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Mary Williams's curator insight, November 23, 2014 8:02 AM

Super collection of videos and images featuring the beauty of chemistry

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Biocat. Agric. Biotech: Engineering plants to tolerate abiotic stresses (Review)

Biocat. Agric. Biotech: Engineering plants to tolerate abiotic stresses (Review) | Plants | Scoop.it

This excellent short overview is in press in a newish journal (beginning in 2012) "Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology" that covers topics of interest to plant scientists. This review is well written and a good resource for students interested in abiotic stress responses.


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Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources

From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources | Plants | Scoop.it

It was super to hear Luis Herrera-Estrella share this exciting work at the ICAR meeting. Luis has been investigating the problem of phosphate limitation for much of his career - see more here: (http://www.hhmi.org/research/sirs/herrera_estrella.html).

 

The work, recently published in Nature Biotechnology (http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v30/n9/full/nbt.2346.html) explores the use of phosphite, a reduced version of phospate, as a dual purpose fertilizer and weed killer. His work suggests that by using phosphite, the limited global reserves could serve our needs for twice as long as if we continue to use it as phosphate.

 

One of the interesting things I learned from his talk is about the source of the enzyme phosphite oxidoreductase. It was found in Bacillus coahuilensis, which lives in a very nutrient-poor environment, Cuatro Ciénegas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuatro_Ci%C3%A9negas). This unique environment is one of only a few places you can find living stromatolites (colonies of cyanobacteia) - Shark Bay, Western Australia is the other well-known place to see them.


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Jorge Sáenz Mata's insight:

Interesting!! Investigadores Mexicanos!!

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Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Power Plants | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Power Plants | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Plants | Scoop.it

Think about it. Everything you have ever eaten, or will ever eat, can ultimately be traced back to an organism carrying out photosynthesis.


Via Meristemi, Eve Emshwiller, Mary Williams
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Dynamic control of lateral root positioning

Dynamic control of lateral root positioning | Plants | Scoop.it
Highlights



The root cap contains an auxin source that modulates lateral root patterning.


Recurrent programmed cell death controls the regular spacing of lateral roots.


Periodic release of auxin by dying root cap may trigger prebranch site formation.


Tropic responses control the LR sidedness.

In dicot root systems, lateral roots are in general regularly spaced along the longitudinal axis of the primary root to facilitate water and nutrient uptake. Recently, recurrent programmed cell death in the root cap of the growing root has been implicated in lateral root spacing. The root cap contains an auxin source that modulates lateral root patterning. Periodic release of auxin by dying root cap cells seems to trigger lateral root specification at regular intervals. However, it is currently unclear through which molecular mechanisms auxin restricts lateral root specification to specific cells along the longitudinal and radial axes of the root, or how environmental signals impact this process.
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Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Domestication: Sweet! A naturally transgenic crop

Domestication: Sweet! A naturally transgenic crop | Plants | Scoop.it
“One of the world's most important staple crops, the sweet potato, is a naturally transgenic plant that was genetically modified thousands of years ago by a soil bacterium. This surprising discovery may influence the public view of GM crops.”
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Mary Williams's curator insight, June 2, 2015 7:49 AM

Nature Plants News & Views by Jonathan Jones (OA)

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Resources for academic writing and publishing

 

I led a workshop on academic writing and publishing last week, and this is a list of resources I gave to the participants. It's not an exhaustive list, so if you have any favorites let me know and I'll add them!

 

Links and resources

 

General writing resources

 

Strunk, W. Jr. (1999).The Elements of Style. http://www.bartleby.com/141/

 

 

 

Guidelines and lessons for good scientific writing

 

Cargill, M., and O’Connor, P. (2011). Writing Scientific Research Articles: Strategy and Steps. Wiley. http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1444356216.html

 

Doumont, J., ed. (2010). English Communication for Scientists. Cambridge, MA: NPG Education. http://www.nature.com/wls/ebooks/english-communication-for-scientists-14053993/contents (Free ebook - very useful)

 

Duke University Graduate School. Scientific Writing Resource.  https://cgi.duke.edu/web/sciwriting/index.php Short, online course for graduate students with examples and worksheets

 

Editorial (2010). Scientific writing 101. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 17: 139-139. http://www.nature.com/nsmb/journal/v17/n2/full/nsmb0210-139.html

 

European Association of Science Editors. EASE Toolkit for Authors. http://www.ease.org.uk/publications/ease-toolkit-authors

 

Nature Scitable Effective Writing. http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/effective-writing-13815989

 

Nature Scitable Scientific Papers. http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/scientific-papers-13815490

 

Lichtfouse, E. (2013). Scientific Writing for Impact Factor Journals. Nova Scientific Publishers, Inc. (New York).

 

Moreira, A., and Haahtela, T. (2011). How to write a scientific paper--and win the game scientists play! Rev. Port. Pneumol. 17:146-149. doi: 10.1016/j.rppneu.2011.03.007. http://www.elsevier.pt/en/linkresolver/320/how-to-write-scientific-paper-and-win/90020266

 

Plaxco, K.W. (2010). The art of writing science. Protein Science 19: 2261 – 2266. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3009394/pdf/pro0019-2261.pdf

 

Rogers, Silvia M. (2014). Mastering Scientific and Medical Writing: A Self-Help Guide. Springer. http://www.springer.com/medicine/book/978-3-642-39445-4https://moodle.swarthmore.edu/pluginfile.php/179173/mod_resource/content/1/Good%20versus%20poor%20scientific%20writing%20from%20Silvia%20Rogers.pdf

 

Writing Center University of Wisconsin. (2014) The Writers Handbook: Reverse Outlines. http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/ReverseOutlines.html

 

 

 

Guidance from journals

 

J Exp Bot: http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/exbotj/for_authors/

 

Nature: http://www.nature.com/authors/author_resources/how_write.html

 

Plant Cell: http://www.plantcell.org/site/misc/ifora.xhtml

 

 

 

Figures preparation and ethical issues

 

Blatt, M. and Martin, C. (2013). Manipulation and Misconduct in the Handling of Image Data. Plant Physiology. 163: 3-4. http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/163/1/3.short

 

Cromey, D.W. (2010). Avoiding twisted pixels: ethical guidelines for the appropriate use and manipulation of scientific digital images. Sci. Eng. Ethics 16: 639–667

 

Rossner, M., and Yamada, K.M. (2004). What’s in a picture? The temptation of image manipulation. J. Cell Biol 166: 11–15. http://jcb.rupress.org/content/166/1/11.short

 

 

 

Peer Review Guidelines and Policies, Post-publication peer review

 

Bastian, H. (2014) A Stronger Post-Publication Culture Is Needed for Better Science. PLoS Med 11(12): e1001772. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001772

 

F1000Research: http://blog.f1000research.com/2014/07/08/what-is-post-publication-peer-review/

 

F1000: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fncom.2012.00063/full

 

Mole. (2007). Rebuffs and rebuttals I: how rejected is rejected? J Cell Sci. 120: 1143-1144. http://hwmaint.jcs.biologists.org/cgi/reprint/120/7/1143

 

Nature: http://www.nature.com/authors/policies/peer_review.html

 

Office of Research Integrity. (US Dept of Health and Human Services) The Lab. http://ori.hhs.gov/THELAB

 

Office of Research Integrity. Research Clinic Case Book. http://ori.hhs.gov/rcr-casebook-stories-about-researchers-worth-discussing

 

Science: http://www.sciencemag.org/site/feature/contribinfo/review.xhtml

 

PLOS ONE:www.plosone.org/static/reviewerGuidelines

 

Provenzale, J.M. and Stanley, R.J. (2006). A Systematic Guide to Reviewing a Manuscript. J. Nuclear Med.Techn.. 34: 92-99. http://tech.snmjournals.org/content/34/2/92.full.pdf+html

 

Times Higher Education: http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/can-post-publication-peer-review-endure/2016895.article

 

 

 

Readability

 

RavenBlog (2010). Ultimate list of online content readability tests. http://blog.raventools.com/ultimate-list-of-online-content-readability-tests/

 

 

 

Communicating more broadly

 

Kuehne, L.M., et al. (2014). Practical science communication strategies for graduate students. Conservation Biology. 28: 1225–1235. .DOI: 10.1111/cobi.12305

 

Osterrieder, A. (2013). The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences. Plant Methods. 9: 26. http://www.plantmethods.com/content/9/1/26

 

 

 


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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, February 3, 2015 8:58 PM

Very helpful for teachers and researchers. 

Andres Zurita's curator insight, February 4, 2015 12:53 PM
Outstanding source of fine material! Thanks Mary!
Rescooped by Jorge Sáenz Mata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Plant Evolution Infographic

Plant Evolution Infographic | Plants | Scoop.it
It's like having a time machine—supercomputers and gene sequencing allow scientists to study early events in plant evolution.  One of our conservation scientists, Norman Wickett, Ph.D., is co-leade...

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Science/AAAS | Special Issue: Smarter Pest Control

Science/AAAS | Special Issue: Smarter Pest Control | Plants | Scoop.it

Don't miss this collection of reviews and commentaries about plant defense, ecological effects of pesticides, pesticide discovery, and new strategies to protect plants from insects.


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Glowing plants spark debate

Glowing plants spark debate | Plants | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, June 5, 2013 4:27 PM


*Glowing plants spark debate* 

by
Ewen Callaway

"Among the many projects attracting crowd-sourced funding on the Kickstarter website this week are a premium Kobe beef jerky, a keyboard instrument called a wheelharp and a small leafy plant that will be made to glow in the dark using synthetic-biology techniques.

 The Glowing Plant project, which ends its fund-raising campaign on 7 June, seeks to engineer the thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana to emit weak, green-blue light by endowing it with genetic circuitry from fireflies. If the non-commercial project succeeds, thousands of supporters will receive seeds to plant the hardy weed wherever they wish. The US government has no problem with this prospect, yet some experts and industry watchers are jittery. They fear that distributing the plants could set a precedent for unsupervised releases of synthetic organisms, and might foster a negative public perception of synthetic biology — an emerging experimental discipline that involves genetically engineering organisms to do useful tasks.
The project, based in the San Francisco Bay Area in California, was conceived as a public demonstration of synthetic biology using gene-writing software and lab-made DNA molecules. The effort also reflects a ‘DIY biology’ movement that seeks to make biotechnology more accessible to the public. “The central goal of the project is to inspire people and educate people about this technology,” says entrepreneur and project co-founder Antony Evans. He and his colleagues — Omri Amirav-Drory, founder of synthetic-biology software firm Genome Compiler in Berkeley, California, and Kyle Taylor, a former biology graduate student at Stanford University in California — set out to make Arabidopsis glow because the feat seemed achievable in a simple garage lab. “There are some people in synthetic-biology circles who would yawn at what we’re doing,” Evans says. Making plants glow has been possible since the 1980s, when scientists added a gene encoding the firefly enzyme luciferase to a tobacco plant. When sprayed with the chemical substrate luciferin, the plant glowed temp­orarily (D. W. Ow et al. Science 234, 856–859; 1986). In 2010, another group engineered a tobacco plant to have its own weak glow, using bacterial genes instead (A. Krichevsky et al. PLoS ONE 5, e15461; 2010). Also in 2010, a team at the University of Cambridge, UK, created a genetic circuit in bacteria that makes both firefly luciferase and luciferin, so that the bacteria glow continuously (go.nature.com/4nxcao). The Glowing Plant team plans to tweak the genes in that circuit so that they work in plants....."


http://bit.ly/ZtRud8

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Synthetic Biology - P2P Foundation

Synthetic Biology - P2P Foundation | Plants | Scoop.it

"Collins is upbeat about medical applications of synthetic biology, moving from synthetic biology of microorganisms into mammalian system, and engineering microbial communities that colonize the digestive system for therapeutics. These are exactly some of the applications that give me reasons to be afraid. Although microbial systems can be modified quite precisely, all attempts to target genetic modifications in eukaryotic cells have so far failed (which is why genetic modification of plants and animals is inherently uncontrollable and unpredictable), and methods to monitor the precision of gene targeting in mammalian cells are just now being developed [18]. Engineering microbial communities in the digestive system that we hardly know about is sheer recklessness, as these microbial communities are intimately intertwined with the physiology and immunity of the human host (see [19] Genetically Modified Probiotics Should Be Banned, ISIS scientific publication).

 


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