Wangari Maathai
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Wangari Maathai, planting trees in Kenya (ages 6-12)

Wangari Maathai, planting trees in Kenya (ages 6-12) | Wangari Maathai | Scoop.it
Wangari Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her work helping women throughout Africa planting trees to improve the environment and their quality of life.
Nashe Siwombe's insight:

Wangari Maathai had a tender heart. She was a great leader who lead Kenya to reforestation. She was amazing!!!!

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Independent Lens | Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai | Promo | PBS

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/takingroot/ Three decades ago, Wangari Maathai suggested to rural women in her native Kenya that they plant trees for fire...
Nashe Siwombe's insight:

Wangari Maathai has inspired a lot of people because of the Green Belt Movement. She was a very strong woman.  She knew that people need trees to live.

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Women as Environmental Change Agents

Women as Environmental Change Agents | Wangari Maathai | Scoop.it

As we celebrate Earth Day, we would be wise to focus on the role of women as environmental leaders. All over the world, women are advancing the green revolution, from transforming farming in rural Africa, to creating businesses around clean technology in India, to investing in renewable energy. Whether in promoting conservation, combating climate change, protecting biodiversity and vital ecosystems, securing water access, or reducing indoor air pollution, women are developing and effecting innovative solutions to critical environmental problems. This should come as no surprise. Studies show it is women who are often most affected by the increased frequency of extreme weather events wrought by climate change. It is women who frequently spend half their days trekking long distances to collect water and fuelwood, which in conflict settings, increases their vulnerability to sexual and gender-based violence, and, in all settings, reduces the amount of time for education, employment, childcare, and other more economically productive activities. It is women who represent the majority of the world's small-holder farmers and who face the disproportionate burden of food insecurity. Women clearly have a stake in the future of the environment and are taking action. Take Nobel Prize-winner Wangari Maathai (pictured) who launched the Green Belt Movement, which has planted millions of trees in Kenya and transformed women into powerful advocates for their rights, good governance and democracy, and natural resource protection. "Sari Squads," groups of women environmental activists in southern Bangladesh, have banded together to form patrols to protect endangered forests from loggers.


Via Cindy Sullivan
Nashe Siwombe's insight:

Wangari Maathai won the Nobel-Peace Prize because she helped Kenya relive. She made Kenya be  a healthy tree place. She contributed to a lot.

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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai | Wangari Maathai | Scoop.it
The dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Waangari Matthai, whose simple act of planting trees grew into a global campaign.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Nashe Siwombe's insight:

Wangari Maathai had the courage to fight against deforestation and save Kenya from suffering.

 

She really didn't like it when the women had to walk miles and miles  to fetch firewood and water to live their daily lives.

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