Plant-microbe interactions
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Cornell Plant Breeding and Genetics Seminar Series - YouTube

Cornell Plant Breeding and Genetics Seminar Series - YouTube | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it

More than 50 one-hour research seminars from the Cornell Plant Breeding and Genetics Seminar series - check them out


Via Mary Williams
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Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, September 3, 2016 11:12 AM

Wow... nice resource.

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Characterization of N2-fixing plant growth promoting endophytic and epiphytic bacterial community of Indian cultivated and wild rice (Oryza spp.) genotypes -

Characterization of N2-fixing plant growth promoting endophytic and epiphytic bacterial community of Indian cultivated and wild rice (Oryza spp.) genotypes - | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it
Main conclusion

The diversity of endophytic and epiphytic diazotrophs in different parts of rice plants has specificity to the niche (i.e. leaf, stem and root) of different genotypes and nutrient availability of the organ.

Inoculation of the indigenous, polyvalent diazotrophs can facilitate and sustain production of non-leguminous crops like rice. Therefore, N2-fixing plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) were isolated from different parts of three Indian cultivated [Oryza sativa L. var. Sabita (semi deep/deep water)/Swarna (rain fed shallow lowland)/Swarna-Sub1(submergence tolerant)] and a wild (O. eichingeri) rice genotypes which respond differentially to nitrogenous fertilizers. Thirty-five isolates from four rice genotypes were categorized based on acetylene reduction assay on nitrogenase activity, biochemical tests, BIOLOG and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The bacteria produced 9.36–155.83 nmole C2H4 mg−1 dry bacteria h−1 and among them nitrogenase activity of 11 potent isolates was complemented by nifH–sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing divided them into five groups (shared 95–100 % sequence homology with type strains) belonging to five classes—alpha (Ancylobacter, Azorhizobium, Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Novosphingobium, spp.), beta (Burkholderia sp.), gamma (Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Azotobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas spp.) Proteobacteria, Bacilli (Bacillus, Paenibacillus spp.) and Actinobacteria (Microbacterium sp.). Besides, all bacterial strains possessed the intrinsic PGP traits of like indole (0.44–7.4 µg ml−1), ammonia (0.18–6 mmol ml−1), nitrite (0.01–3.4 mol ml−1), and siderophore (from 0.16–0.57 μmol ml−1) production. Inoculation of rice (cv. Swarna) seedlings with selected isolates had a positive impact on plant growth parameters like shoot and root elongation which was correlated with in vitro PGP attributes. The results indicated that the diverse polyvalent phytonic PGP bacteria, which may be exploited as bio-inoculants to improve rice production.
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Overview of Nitrogen fixing organisms

An overview of nitrogen fixing organisms and their association with plants.


Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Scientists: Engage the Public!

“ Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or “Sagan effect” associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist’s career. There are a variety of approaches that scientists can take to become active in science communication.”

 

There are several concrete steps that scientists can take to participate in or support science communication by scientists.

Seek out training in order to increase your effectiveness. There are many organizations that offer a variety of communication training opportunities. For example, there will be several science communication sessions at the upcoming ASM Microbe meeting. Participating in communication training can also be a great confidence booster.

Leverage your time and efforts by partnering with organizations that reach audiences you care about in your community.

Support your students, employees, and colleagues in their science communication efforts by encouraging them, sharing your experiences, and helping them prioritize these activities.

If you are an NSF grantee, then focus your BI work to “Broaden dissemination to enhance scientific and technological understanding.”

If available, take advantage of your institution’s BI office to help you form partnerships to broaden your reach.

Seek out scientists who communicate with the public and learn how they work.

Explore the science communication resources and programs from the scientific societies to which you belong. Groups such as Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences (http://nas-sites.org/publicinterfaces/#) also help scientists to find the knowledge and tools to develop public engagement approaches in the life sciences.


Via Francis Martin, Daniel Wipf, Jean-Michel Ané
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Rescooped by Marlene-OB from GMOs, NBT & Sustainable agriculture
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Farm-grown fish oil a step closer following GM crop trial

Farm-grown fish oil a step closer following GM crop trial | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it

British scientists develop GM oilseed crop containing omega-3 fatty acids that could provide sustainable alternative to farmed fish, such as salmon

Fish oil grown on the farm has come a step closer following promising results from a genetically modified crop trial.

British scientists have developed a GM oilseed plant, Camelina sativa or “false flax”, whose seeds contain omega-3 fatty acids normally only present in oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring.

The new study conducted at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, Hertfordshire, showed that the plants were able to synthesise useful amounts of fish oil in field conditions without affecting their yield.

The next stage of the research will involve testing different strains of the crop and comparing them with conventional Camelina.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Evolution and Diversity of Plant Cell Walls: From Algae to Flowering Plants - Annual Review of Plant Biology, 62(1):567

Evolution and Diversity of Plant Cell Walls: From Algae to Flowering Plants - Annual Review of Plant Biology, 62(1):567 | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it
All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall. The cell wall exerts considerable biological and biomechanical control over individual cells and organisms, thus playing a key role in their environmental interactions. This has resulted in compositional variation that is dependent on developmental stage, cell type, and season. Further variation is evident that has a phylogenetic basis. Plants and algae have a complex phylogenetic history, including acquisition of genes responsible for carbohydrate synthesis and modification through a series of primary (leading to red algae, green algae, and land plants) and secondary (generating brown algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) endosymbiotic events. Therefore, organisms that have the shared features of photosynthesis and possession of a cell wall do not form a monophyletic group. Yet they contain some common wall components that can be explained increasingly by genetic and biochemical evidence.

Via Francis Martin
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Molecular Breeding for Improved Second Generation Bioenergy Crops

Molecular Breeding for Improved Second Generation Bioenergy Crops | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it
There is increasing urgency to develop and deploy sustainable sources of energy to reduce our global dependency on finite, high-carbon fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic feedstocks, used in power and liquid fuel generation, are valuable sources of non-food plant biomass. They are cultivated with minimal inputs on marginal or degraded lands to prevent competition with arable agriculture and offer significant potential for sustainable intensification (the improvement of yield without the necessity for additional inputs) through advanced molecular breeding. This article explores progress made in next generation sequencing, advanced genotyping, association genetics, and genetic modification in second generation bioenergy production. Using poplar as an exemplar where most progress has been made, a suite of target traits is also identified giving insight into possible routes for crop improvement and deployment in the immediate future.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Nitrogen Cycle ,Nitrogen Fixation - Explanation in animation

You will learn about Nitrogen Cycle in this video. Nitrogen constitutes around 78% of the air. However, atmospheric nitrogen cannot be used directly by plants .

NITROGEN CYCLE:Nitrogen is the important essential element for all living organisms by the synthesis of Amino acids, proteins, Enzymesetc.What happens if .


Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Nitrogen Uptake of Plants: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps

Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Nitrogen Uptake of Plants: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an essential role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many important crop species. The extraradical mycelium of the fungus takes up nutrients from the soil, transfers these nutrients to the intraradical mycelium within the host root, and exchanges the nutrients against carbon from the host across a specialized plant-fungal interface. The contribution of the AM symbiosis to the phosphate nutrition has long been known, but whether AM fungi contribute similarly to the nitrogen nutrition of their host is still controversially discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence that demonstrates that AM fungi can actively transfer nitrogen to their host, and that the host plant with its carbon supply stimulates this transport, and that the periarbuscular membrane of the host is able to facilitate the active uptake of nitrogen from the mycorrhizal interface. In this review, our current knowledge about nitrogen transport through the fungal hyphae and across the mycorrhizal interface is summarized, and we discuss the regulation of these pathways and major research gaps.

Via Francis Martin
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Multi-gene engineering in plants with RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease

The use of RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease for the concurrent engineering of multiple genes has been demonstrated in a number of plant species. Although Cas9 is a large monomeric protein, the single guide RNA (sgRNA) that directs it to a specific DNA target sequence is small and easy to reprogram. It is therefore relatively simple to produce numerous sgRNAs to target multiple endogenous sequences. Several approaches to express multiple sgRNAs and Cas9 in plants for the purpose of simultaneous editing or transcriptional regulation of many genes have recently been reported.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit

Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it
Nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a crucial area of research for more sustainable agriculture. Our knowledge of the plant cascade in response to the perception of bacterial Nod factors has increased in recent years. However, the discovery that Nod factors are not involved in the Aeschynomene-Bradyrhizobium spp. interaction suggests that alternative molecular dialogues may exist in the legume family. We evaluated the conservation of the signaling pathway common to other endosymbioses using three candidate genes: Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase (CCaMK), which plays a central role in cross signaling between nodule organogenesis and infection processes; and Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) and Histidine Kinase1 (HK1), which act upstream and downstream of CCaMK, respectively. We showed that CCaMK, SYMRK, and HK1 are required for efficient nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia. Our results demonstrate that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far.
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New Phytologist: Special Issue: Plants interacting with other organisms (October 2014)

New Phytologist: Special Issue: Plants interacting with other organisms (October 2014) | Plant-microbe interactions | Scoop.it

Editorial

 

Plant interactions with other organisms: molecules, ecology and evolution

 

Commentary

 

Different shades of JAZ during plant growth and defense

 

Nutrient supply differentially alters the dynamics of co-infecting phytoviruses

 

Letters

 

From shade avoidance responses to plant performance at vegetation level: using virtual plant modelling as a tool
F. J. Bongers, J. B. Evers, N. P. R. Anten & R. Pierik

 

Review

 

Magical mystery tour: MLO proteins in plant immunity and beyond
J. Acevedo-Garcia, S. Kusch & R. Panstruga

 

The squeeze cell hypothesis for the activation of jasmonate synthesis in response to wounding

E. E. Farmer, D. Gasperini & I. F. Acosta

 

Lipochitooligosaccharide recognition: an ancient story
Y. Liang, K. Tóth, Y. Cao, K. Tanaka, C. Espinoza & G. Stacey

 

Herbivore-induced plant volatiles: targets, perception and unanswered questions
M. Heil

 

There’s no place like home? An exploration of the mechanisms behind plant litter–decomposer affinity in terrestrial ecosystems
A. T. Austin, L. Vivanco, A. González-Arzac & L. I. Pérez

 

Insect herbivore-associated organisms affect plant responses to herbivory
F. Zhu, E. H. Poelman & M. Dicke

 

When mutualism goes bad: density- dependent impacts of introduced bees on plant reproduction
M. A. Aizen, C. L. Morales, D. P. Vázquez, L. A. Garibaldi, A. Sáez & L. D. Harder

 

Insect and pathogen attack and resistance in maize and its wild ancestors, the teosintes
E. S. de Lange, D. Balmer, B. Mauch-Mani & T. C. J. Turlings

 

Full papers

 

Linking phytochrome to plant immunity: low red : far-red ratios increase Arabidopsis susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea by reducing the biosynthesis of indolic glucosinolates and camalexin
M. D. Cargnel, P. V. Demkura & C. L. Ballaré

 

To grow or defend? Low red : far-red ratios reduce jasmonate sensitivity in Arabidopsis seedlings by promoting DELLA degradation and increasing JAZ10 stability
M. Leone, M. M. Keller, I. Cerrudo & C. L. Ballaré

 

β-Glucosidase BGLU42 is a MYB72-dependent key regulator of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance and modulates iron deficiency responses in Arabidopsis roots
C. Zamioudis, J. Hanson & C. M. J. Pieterse

 

Deciphering the language of plant communication: volatile chemotypes of sagebrush
R. Karban, W. C. Wetzel, K. Shiojiri, S. Ishizaki, S. R. Ramirez & J. D. Blande

 

The context dependence of beneficiary feedback effects on benefactors in plant facilitation
C. Schöb, R. M. Callaway, F. Anthelme, R. W. Brooker, L. A. Cavieres, Z. Kikvidze, C. J. Lortie, R. Michalet, F. I. Pugnaire, S. Xiao, B. H. Cranston, M-C. García, N. R. Hupp, L. D. Llambí, E. Lingua, A. M. Reid, L. Zhao & B. J. Butterfield

 

Herbivore-mediated material fluxes in a northern deciduous forest under elevated carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations
T. D. Meehan, J. J. Couture, A. E. Bennett & R. L. Lindroth

 

Are plant–soil feedback responses explained by plant traits?
C. Baxendale, K. H. Orwin, F. Poly, T. Pommier & R. D. Bardgett

 

Environmental nutrient supply alters prevalence and weakens competitive interactions among coinfecting viruses
C. Lacroix, E. W. Seabloom & E. T. Borer


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Francis Martin
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