Plant endophytes
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Bacteria To Aid Sustainable Sugarcane Production - Food Product Design

Bacteria To Aid Sustainable Sugarcane Production - Food Product Design | Plant endophytes | Scoop.it
“Asian Scientist Magazine Bacteria To Aid Sustainable Sugarcane Production Food Product Design Researchers discovered a new bacterium, Burkholderia australis, that promotes plant growth through a process called nitrogen fixation.”
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This Queensland, Australia group of investigators are really on the forefront with their research.
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Endophyte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Endophyte

An endophyte is an endosymbiont, often a bacterium or fungus, that lives within a plant for at least part of its life without causing apparent disease. Endophytes are ubiquitous and have been found in all the species of plants studied to date; however, most of these endophyte/plant relationships are not well understood.

“@eltonjohn good Q but I’d say any fungi in enviro studied primarily through molecular means. I work on endophytes: http://t.co/v4hoVkOTcA”
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This Wikipedia article on endophytes is incomplete. It is in need of expansion and some revision.
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This endophyte may aid plants by increasing decomposition of organic forms of nitrogen.
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Life scientists differentiate microbial good and evil - Phys.org

Life scientists differentiate microbial good and evil - Phys.org | Plant endophytes | Scoop.it
“"We have shown that a certain group of Burkholderia, which have just been discovered in the last 12 years as plant-growth promoting bacteria, are not pathogenic," said the study's senior author, Ann Hirsch, a professor of ...”
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This is an important study with respect to application of endophytes to enhance food crops. Some of the endophytic microbes appear related to facultative pathogens. It may be that the pathogenic and plant symbiotic strains are distinct.
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To UW-Madison professor, there's nothing ordinary about vanilla

To UW-Madison professor, there's nothing ordinary about vanilla | Plant endophytes | Scoop.it
A UW-Madison expert on vanilla orchids crosses the world to ensure that the spice it produces remains a valuable agricultural product. Madison— To Ken Cameron, vanilla is a lot sexier than its name implies. The world's leading expert on the biology of vanilla orchids sees the popular spice, not as plain or ordinary, but as a beautifully complex and valuable commodity produced from the world's largest family of plants. While bottles of vanilla extract fly off store shelves at this time of year as holiday bakers mix it into cakes, pies and cookies, vanilla is much more than a pastry chef's favorite spice. Deodorants, household cleaners, popular brands of vodka, pill coatings, the finest perfumes, even Coke and Pepsi count vanilla as an ingredient. And, of course, it's the No. 1 selling ice cream. "I often tell people, 'I'll challenge you that within 10 minutes of waking, you will encounter vanilla,'" Cameron said in his book- and plant-filled office at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he's a botany professor and director of the Wisconsin State Herbarium." Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/newswatch/to-uw-madison-professor-theres-nothing-ordinary-about-vanilla-b99156145z1-236666281.html#ixzz2q3Z6nlzh Follow us: @JournalSentinel on Twitter
Via Eve Emshwiller, Mary Williams
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Vanilla vines contain bacterial endophytes that fix nitrogen and secrete anti microbial lipopeptides into growing tissues of the plant. This may enable the vanilla plants to grow as an epiphyte. Vanilla plants may be a good model system to study the plant microbiome.
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