Plant & Botany Science
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Rescooped by Li Sen from Host-Microbe Interactions. Plant Biology.
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The role of water in plant‐microbe interactions

The role of water in plant‐microbe interactions | Plant & Botany Science | Scoop.it
Plants are associated with various microorganisms throughout their life, including commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms. Pathogens are genetically adapted to aggressively colonize an

Via Tatsuya Nobori
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Rescooped by Li Sen from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Writing workshop 2016

How to write scientific research articles- from structuring your paper to polishing it, ethical issues in writing and figure preparation, and peer review

Via Mary Williams
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Guojian HU's curator insight, March 11, 2016 2:45 AM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

Jennifer Mach's curator insight, March 21, 2016 3:51 PM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

Thirumurugan's curator insight, March 26, 2016 5:05 AM

I ran a two-hour writing workshop for scientists yesterday at the University of Nottingham - here are my slides.

Rescooped by Li Sen from Plant Sciences
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Reassess the t Test: Interact with All Your Data via ANOVA


Via Loïc Lepiniec, Saclay Plant Sciences
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Rescooped by Li Sen from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Active learning in plant biology lectures

Today Nature published a terrific article called "Why we are teaching science wrong, and how to make it right" which describes a variety of effective strategies for active learning, and which prompted a colleague from Brazil to ask for suggestions for how to implement these ideas in a plant biology classroom.

 

I regularly run a workshop on this topic, and here I've uploaded the slides I use. Because it is a workshop on active learning, a lot of the time is spent on activities, which I've tried to make clear in the slides.

 

Here are links to a few freely available and very useful resources that I provide to the workshop participants and are mentioned in the slides:

 

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education by NSF and AAAS 
and the most recent update (opens PDF)  http://visionandchange.org/files/2015/07/VISchange2015_webFin.pdf


Searching for Better Approaches: Effective Evaluation of Teaching and Learning in STEM, a new AAU/Cottrell Scholars resource.

 

Scientific Teaching in Practice by Miller et al (and Jo Handelsman) also here (http://cst.yale.edu/s…/default/files/Miller_et_al_2008_0.pdf).

 

Talking to Learn: Why Biology Students Should Be Talking in Classrooms and How to Make It Happen by Kimberly D. Tanner

 

In the slide set, there is a link to an excellent video featuring Chandralekha Singh' that demonstrates active learning in a physics classroom.

 

Furthermore, each Teaching Tool in Plant Biology article has a Teaching Guide that includes lists of questions, both specific and open-ended, that can be used to prompt classroom discussions and projects.

 

Finally, later this year the Teaching Tools resources will be moved to a new site (Plantae.org) that will provide opportunities for students and instructors to share ideas and teaching strategies - look for annoucements soon.


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Li Sen from Just Story It
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The LEGO® Story

As The LEGO Group celebrates its 80th Birthday, we take a look back at its history with this short animated film. Find out more here, http://www.facebook.com...

 

Here's some Friday Fun -- the animated story of LEGO! I wish more companies -- of any size -- would do something similar. 

 

I love LEGO and could still happily spend hours building things. Now I know the fascinating story behind it. Which makes me love those plastic bricks all the more.

 

This is a 15 minute video (minus the rolling credits at the end). It's a little long and it could have been told a bit better. I found the narration a bit slow and sing-songy. Sigh. So the execution could use some work.

 

But overlook that and it is still a great story!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Scooped by Li Sen
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Mitogen‐activated protein kinases and calcium‐dependent protein kinases are involved in wounding‐induced ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

Mitogen‐activated protein kinases and calcium‐dependent protein kinases are involved in wounding‐induced ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana | Plant & Botany Science | Scoop.it
Ethylene, an important hormone in plant growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli, is rapidly induced by mechanical injury or wounding. Although induction of AC
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Rescooped by Li Sen from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Creating curiosity and inspiring inquiry

A one-hour lecture about science communication and science education. How do we engage the public and our students?

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, March 10, 2016 7:31 AM

I was asked to speak on science communication and science education - here's my talk that looks at how they are similar and how they differ.

Thirumurugan's curator insight, March 26, 2016 5:15 AM

I was asked to speak on science communication and science education - here's my talk that looks at how they are similar and how they differ.

Scooped by Li Sen
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Multilayered Regulation of Ethylene Induction Plays a Positive Role in Arabidopsis Resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

Multilayered Regulation of Ethylene Induction Plays a Positive Role in Arabidopsis Resistance against Pseudomonas syringae | Plant & Botany Science | Scoop.it
Li Sen's insight:

Regulation of ethylene production by Pseudomonas syringae to confer plants enhanced disease resistance. 

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Rescooped by Li Sen from Plants and Microbes
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PNAS: The genome of cultivated sweet potato contains Agrobacterium T-DNAs with expressed genes: An example of a naturally transgenic food crop (2015)

PNAS: The genome of cultivated sweet potato contains Agrobacterium T-DNAs with expressed genes: An example of a naturally transgenic food crop (2015) | Plant & Botany Science | Scoop.it

Agrobacterium rhizogenes and Agrobacterium tumefaciens are plant pathogenic bacteria capable of transferring DNA fragments [transfer DNA (T-DNA)] bearing functional genes into the host plant genome. This naturally occurring mechanism has been adapted by plant biotechnologists to develop genetically modified crops that today are grown on more than 10% of the world’s arable land, although their use can result in considerable controversy. While assembling small interfering RNAs, or siRNAs, of sweet potato plants for metagenomic analysis, sequences homologous to T-DNA sequences from Agrobacterium spp. were discovered. Simple and quantitative PCR, Southern blotting, genome walking, and bacterial artificial chromosome library screening and sequencing unambiguously demonstrated that two different T-DNA regions (IbT-DNA1 and IbT-DNA2) are present in the cultivated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) genome and that these foreign genes are expressed at detectable levels in different tissues of the sweet potato plant. IbT-DNA1 was found to contain four open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to the tryptophan-2-monooxygenase (iaaM), indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (iaaH), C-protein (C-prot), and agrocinopine synthase (Acs) genes of Agrobacterium spp. IbT-DNA1 was detected in all 291 cultigens examined, but not in close wild relatives. IbT-DNA2 contained at least five ORFs with significant homology to the ORF14, ORF17n, rooting locus (Rol)B/RolC, ORF13, and ORF18/ORF17n genes of A. rhizogenes. IbT-DNA2 was detected in 45 of 217 genotypes that included both cultivated and wild species. Our finding, that sweet potato is naturally transgenic while being a widely and traditionally consumed food crop, could affect the current consumer distrust of the safety of transgenic food crops.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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