Plant biology
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Guy from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

What If Your Blood Was Deadly to Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes?

What If Your Blood Was Deadly to Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes? | Plant biology | Scoop.it

A commonly used anti-parasite drug could be the next weapon in the fight against malaria. Researchers from Kenya and the United Kingdom report that dosing people with ivermectin, commonly used in heartworm pills, makes them deadly targets for the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Nearly all of the mosquitoes in the experiment died after drinking ivermectin-laced blood, they say.

 

While malaria rates have been dropping historically, the disease still afflicts over 200 million people a year, mostly in the developing world, and was responsible for nearly half a million deaths in 2015, according to the WHO. And there are worries that resistance to artemisinin, the drug of choice for combating malaria, could continue to spread beyond southeast Asia, where most resistant strains are currently found.

 

Ivermectin could be another solution, and one that’s easily applicable given the prevalence of the drug. In the study, published last month in The Lancet, the researchers gave 47 malaria patients 600-milligram doses of ivermectin for three consecutive days. That’s around three times the normal dose, but the drug possesses few side effects, and had already been shown to be deadly to mosquitoes when in the bloodstream.

 

After feeding blood from the patients to mosquitoes, the researchers report that 97 percent of the blood-suckers died after two weeks, and the blood remained deadly for up to 28 days. The patients, meanwhile reported little in the way of side effects. A separate group of patients received doses of 300 mg per day, but the mosquito-killing effect wasn’t as strong.

 

It remains to be seen how safe the drug is for children at such high doses, and the authors do note that their participants were all malaria patients, so the effects could differ in healthy people. And worries of drug resistance could hound ivermectin as well — if it begins to see widespread use, mosquitoes may begin to evolve immunity. Further studies will be needed, NPRreports, and would likely be only part of an effective campaign to eradicate malaria.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Guy from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A new self-healing chemistry for plastics

A new self-healing chemistry for plastics | Plant biology | Scoop.it
Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) andEvonik Industries have developed a self-healing chemistry that allows for rapid healing of a plastic material using mild heating, restoring its initial molecular structure. It is based on a reversible chemical crosslinking reaction. - The reaction happens at temperatures from 50°C (122°F) to 120°C (248°F). - The material can be restored completely in less than 5 minutes, and is bound even more strongly than before. - Flowability is enhanced at higher temperatures, so the material can also be molded. - The self-healing properties can be transferred to a variety of plastics, including fiber-reinforced plastics components for automotive vehicles and aircraft. - Healing is also possible for material with scratches.The research results were published in the journal Advanced Materials. Research partners were the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research, Dresden, and the Australian National University, Canberra.* The material uses a new low-temperature reversible system based on covalent chemistry, using “hetero Diels–Alder (HDA)” reactions via a new cyanodithioester compound with cyclopentadiene.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Guy from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
Scoop.it!

Plant biology: How bacteria turn plants into zombies

Plant biology: How bacteria turn plants into zombies | Plant biology | Scoop.it
Researchers have uncovered how certain bacterial pathogens that infect plants make them sterile and capable only of spreading disease.
Phytoplasma pathogens are transmitted by sap-feeding insects that turn flowers (such as Arabidopsis thaliana, pictured top) into leaf-like structures (bottom) that do not produce seeds. Saskia Hogenhout at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, and her colleagues studied Arabidopsis plants and found that a phytoplasma protein, SAP54, interacts with a class of plant proteins called RAD23 to degrade molecules that regulate floral development.
Nature 508, 152 (10 April 2014)
doi:10.1038/508152c

Via NatProdChem
Guy's insight:
The result of bioengineered insects , tics were used to infect livestock as a weapon , why wouldn't they be used to infect certain plants to control the food source.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Guy from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New naming rules for fungi? Genetic advances spur mycologists to put their kingdom in order

New naming rules for fungi? Genetic advances spur mycologists to put their kingdom in order | Plant biology | Scoop.it
“A rebellion has broken out against the traditional way of naming species in the peculiar, shape-shifting world of fungi.”Many fungi are shape-shifters seemingly designed to defy human efforts at categorization. The same species, sometimes the same individual, can reproduce two ways: sexually, by mixing genes with a partner of the same species, or asexually, by cloning to produce genetically identical offspring.The problem is that reproductive modes can take entirely different anatomical forms. A species that looks like a miniature corn dog when it is reproducing sexually might look like fuzzy white twigs when it is in cloning mode. A gray smudge on a sunflower seed head might just be the asexually reproducing counterpart of a tiny satellite dish–shaped thing. Just by looking at them, you’d never know.When many of these pairs were discovered, sometimes decades apart, sometimes growing right next to each other, it was difficult or impossible to demonstrate that they were the same thing. So one species would get two names. Careful observation later suggested that officially different species are actually one, but the pairs of names remained. In fact, it soon became standard mycological practice to name many species twice — once for the sexual form, once for the asexual one.Now, mycologists have a chance to set the record straight. A group of upstart scientists has rebelled against the dual-naming system, arguing that DNA analysis can endow fungi with a one-species, one-name system. Having won a major victory at a recent international scientific congress, they are poised to bring their field into a new era of genetic nomenclature. But however justified genetically, their project is not without perils.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Guy's insight:
Wonder if the genetically engineered fungi created to battle insects has changed to effect humans in the form of a fugal virus that alters its DNA to hide and replicate inside the body
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Guy from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

Google Patents Tiny Cameras Embedded In Contact Lenses

Google Patents Tiny Cameras Embedded In Contact Lenses | Plant biology | Scoop.it
Google has a new patent application with the USPTO (via 9to5Google), which takes one of the basic concepts of Glass and extends it even further, embedding tiny cameras that could be embedded in contact lenses for various uses, including photographing what a wearer sees, or providing the basic input for a contact-based assistive device for the visually impaired.
Via Gust MEES
Guy's insight:
Hopefully will be used for anyone in need not just the wealthy and not delayed by the Alphabet administrations
more...
No comment yet.