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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from Emerging Trends in Publishing and Science Writing
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Confessions of a managing editor (or 6 reasons I’m returning your manuscript)

Confessions of a managing editor (or 6 reasons I’m returning your manuscript) | plant biology | Scoop.it
Things you do – innocently, of course – to drive your science editor crazy

Via Francis Martin, Jennifer Mach
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Near-isogenic lines enhancing ascorbic acid, anthocyanin and carotenoid content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Micro-Tom) as a tool to produce nutrient-rich fruits

Near-isogenic lines enhancing ascorbic acid, anthocyanin and carotenoid content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Micro-Tom) as a tool to produce nutrient-rich fruits | plant biology | Scoop.it

An elegant approach in both pre-breeding and diet supplementation tests is the use of near-isogenic lines (NILs). Here, we tap on the large pool of monogenic mutants and natural genetic variation available in tomato to create a series of NILs in the genetic background of the cultivar Micro-Tom (MT). We describe the introgression of the mutations Anthocyanin fruit (Aft), atroviolacium (atv), Aubergine (Abg), Beta-carotene (B), old-gold crimson (og) and high pigment 1 and 2 (hp1, hp2) and characterize their fruit metabolic profiles in single, double and triple mutant combinations. We show that Brix can be raised without yield penalty, along with increases in lycopene, β-carotene and ascorbic acid, and a concomitant enhancement of anti-oxidant capacity. As proof-of-concept of the suitability of stacking alleles for breeding nutrient-rich tomatoes, we introduce three mutations leading to uniformly purple fruits and enhanced nutrient contents from MT into a commercial cherry tomato cultivar.

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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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PNAS: Sugar demand, not auxin, is the initial regulator of apical dominance

PNAS: Sugar demand, not auxin, is the initial regulator of apical dominance | plant biology | Scoop.it

"We have revealed that apical dominance is predominantly controlled by the shoot tip’s intense demand for sugars, which limits sugar availability to the axillary buds. These findings overturn a long-standing hypothesis on apical dominance and encourage us to reevaluate the relationship between hormones and sugars in this and other aspects of plant development."

By Michael G. Mason, John J. Ross, Benjamin A. Babst, Brittany N. Wienclaw, and Christine A. Beveridge


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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PlantPhys: Export of Salicylic Acid from the Chloroplast requires EDS5

PlantPhys: Export of Salicylic Acid from the Chloroplast requires EDS5 | plant biology | Scoop.it

"Genetic studies indicated that the multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY5 (EDS5) of Arabidopsis is necessary for SA accumulation after biotic and abiotic stress. The location at the chloroplast envelope supports a model of the effect of EDS5 on SA biosynthesis: in the eds5 mutant, stress-induced SA is trapped in the chloroplast and inhibits its own accumulation by autoinhibitory feedback."


Via Mary Williams
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What's in your strawberries? - EiC May 2012

What's in your strawberries? - EiC May 2012 | plant biology | Scoop.it

Wild strawberries have higher aroma intensities and significantly richer flavours because they contain greater quantities of odorous molecules.

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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
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The genome of the stress-tolerant wild tomato species Solanum pennellii

The genome of the stress-tolerant wild tomato species Solanum pennellii | plant biology | Scoop.it
Bjorn Usadel and colleagues report the genome sequence of the wild tomato species Solanum pennellii. The authors identify genes important for stress tolerance, metabolism and fruit maturation and suggest that transposable elements have had an important role in the evolution of the S. penellii stress response.

Via Jennifer Mach
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Mechanism of Activation of Protein Kinase JAK2 by the Growth Hormone Receptor

Mechanism of Activation of Protein Kinase JAK2 by the Growth Hormone Receptor | plant biology | Scoop.it

 Class I cytokines regulate key processes such as growth, lactation, hematopoiesis, and immune function and contribute to oncogenesis. Although the extracellular domain structures of their receptors are well characterized, little is known about how the receptors activate their associated JAK (Janus kinase) protein kinases. We provide a mechanistic description for this process, focusing on the growth hormone (GH) receptor and its associated JAK2.

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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from plant cell genetics
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A Spatial Accommodation by Neighboring Cells Is Required for Organ Initiation in Arabidopsis

A Spatial Accommodation by Neighboring Cells Is Required for Organ Initiation in Arabidopsis | plant biology | Scoop.it

Lateral root formation in plants can be studied as the process of interaction between chemical signals and physical forces during development. Lateral root primordia grow through overlying cell layers that must accommodate this incursion. Here, we analyze responses of the endodermis, the immediate neighbor to an initiating lateral root. Endodermal cells overlying lateral root primordia lose volume, change shape, and relinquish their tight junction–like diffusion barrier to make way for the emerging lateral root primordium. Endodermal feedback is absolutely required for initiation and growth of lateral roots, and we provide evidence that this is mediated by controlled volume loss in the endodermis. We propose that turgidity and rigid cell walls, typical of plants, impose constraints that are specifically modified for a given developmental process.


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
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Atomic insights into how plant steroid hormone makes plants grow

Atomic insights into how plant steroid hormone makes plants grow | plant biology | Scoop.it
If one wants to better understand how plants grow, one must analyse the chemistry of life in its molecular detail. Michael Hothorn from the Friedrich-Miescher-Laboratory of the Max Planck Society in Tübingen and his team are ...
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Rescooped by Ivan Sestari from plant cell genetics
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Stress Enhances the Synthesis of Secondary Plant Products: The Impact of Stress-Related Over-Reduction on the Accumulation of Natural Products

Stress Enhances the Synthesis of Secondary Plant Products: The Impact of Stress-Related Over-Reduction on the Accumulation of Natural Products | plant biology | Scoop.it

Spice and medicinal plants grown under water deficiency conditions reveal much higher concentrations of relevant natural products compared with identical plants of the same species cultivated with an ample water supply. For the first time, experimental data related to this well-known phenomenon have been collected and a putative mechanistic concept considering general plant physiological and biochemical aspects is presented. Water shortage induces drought stress-related metabolic responses and, due to stomatal closure, the uptake of CO2 decreases significantly. As a result, the consumption of reduction equivalents (NADPH + H+) for CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle declines considerably, generating a large oxidative stress and an oversupply of reduction equivalents. As a consequence, metabolic processes are shifted towards biosynthetic activities that consume reduction equivalents. Accordingly, the synthesis of reduced compounds, such as isoprenoids, phenols or alkaloids, is enhanced.


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
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